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GRADUATE CATALOG 1983-1985 



AC 30 
1983/8/ 
Grad ^ 



iversity of New Haven 




Digitized by the Internet Arciiive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/universityofne198384univ 



University of NewHaven 






GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 

CATALOG 

1983-85 



300 Orange Avenue 
West Haven, Conn. 06516 
(203) 932-7133 



This catalog supersedes all previous bulletins, catalogs and brochures 
published by the Graduate School and describes academic programs 
to be offered beginning in fall 1983. Graduate students admitted to the 
university for the fall of 1983 and thereafter are bound by the 
regulations published in this catalog. 

The University of New Haven is committed to affirmative action and 
to a policy which provides for equal opportunity in employment, 
advancement, admission, educational opportunity and administration 
of financial aid to all persons on the basis of individual merit. This 
policy is administered without regard to race, color, national origin, 
age, sex, religion or disabilities not related to performance. It is the 
policy of the University of New Haven not to discriminate on the basis 
of sex in its admission, educational programs, activities or employment 
policies as required by Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments. 
This school is authorized under federal law to enroll non-immigrant 
alien students. 

Inquiries regarding affirmative action, equal opportunity and Title IX 
may be directed to the director of equal opportunity. 

The male generic terms appearing throughout this book refer to both 
males and females and are used for grammatical simplicity and 
semantic convenience. 

The university reserves the right, at any time, to make whatever 
changes may be deemed necessary in admission requirements, fees, 
charges, tuition, regulations and academic programs prior to the start 
of any class, term, semester, trimester or session. 

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained 
in this publication is accurate and current; however, the university 
cannot be held responsible for typographical errors or omissions that 
may have occurred. 

Volume VI. No. 8 May 1983 

The University of New Haven is published eight times a year in February, April, 
May (2), July (2) and November (2) by the University of New Haven, 300 Orange 
Avenue, West Haven, Connecticut 06516. Second class postage paid at New 
Haven, Connecticut, publication number USPS 423-410. Postmaster: please send 
fonr 3579 to Office of Public Relations, University of New Haven, P.O. Box 
9605, New Haven, CT 06535-0605. 




ACADEMIC 
PROGRAMS 



Accounting 

Business Administration (M.B.A.) 

Business Administration/Public Administration 

dual degree 
Business Administration/Industrial 

Engineering dual degree 
Community Psychology 
Computer and Information Science 
Criminal Justice 
Electrical Engineering 
Environmental Engineering 
Environmental Science 
Executive M.B.A. 
Forensic Science 
Gerontology 
Humanities 
Industrial Engineering 
Industrial/Organizational Psychology 
Industrial Relations 
Legal Studies 
Mechanical Engineering 
Occupational Safety and 

Health Management 
Operations Research 
Public Administration (M.P.A.) 
Taxation 



Senior Professional 
Certificates 

Accounting (3 options) 

Applications of Psychology 

Computer Applications & Information Systems 

Dietetics Administration 

Economic Forecasting 

Finance 

General Management 

Gerontology 

Hotel & Restaurant Administration 

Human Resources Management 

International Business 

Marketing (2 options) 

Media in Business 

Public Management (3 options) 

Quantitative Analysis 

Taxation (2 options) 

Professional Certificates 

Advanced Investigation (Forensic Science) 
Criminalistics (Forensic Science) 
Fire Science (Forensic Science) 
Security Management (Criminal Justice) 



Summer Term 1983 



Fall Term 1983 



Winter Term 1984 



Spring Term 1984 



CALENDAR 

1983-1984 



Monday, July 11 - Thursday, Aug. 25 

Fall term deadline for receipt of completed 
application and supporting materials* Wednesday, June 1 

Saturday, Sept. 10 - Saturday, Dec. 17 

Last day to register Friday, Aug. 26 

Holiday, no classes Saturday, Sept. 17 

Last day to add a class Monday, Sept. 19 

Winter term deadline for receipt of completed 



application and supporting materials* 
Holiday (Columbus Day), no classes 
Last day to petition for January 

graduation 
Holiday (Thanksgiving), no classes 

Commencement 

Tuesday, Jan. 3 - Saturday, Mar. 31 

Last day to register 

Spring term deadline for completed 

application and supporting materials* 
Last day to add a class 
Holiday (President's Day), Classes meet 

Saturday, Feb. 25, at 1 p.m. 
Last day to petition for June graduation 
Commencement 
Wednesday, April 4 - July 3 
Last day to register 
Last day to add a class 
Holiday (Memorial Day), Classes meet 

Saturday, June 2, at 1 p.m. 
*Prospechve students who complete their application after this date may register 
for one term as non-matriculated in-process students. This registration does not 
guarantee acceptance. 

International students are not eligible for in-process registration because of 
immigration applications and should submit completed applications and all 
supporting materials well in advance of these deadlines. 



Saturday, Oct. 1 
Monday, Oct. 10 

Friday, Oct. 14 

Tuesday, Nov. 22 - 

Saturday, Nov. 26 

Sunday, Jan. 22 

Friday, Dec. 16 

Sunday, Jan. 1 
Monday, Jan. 16 

Monday, Feb. 20 

Thursday, Mar. 1 

Sunday, June 10 

Friday, Mar. 23 
Tuesday, April 17 

Monday, May 28 



CONTENTS 



Calendar 5 
The Graduate School 9 
Admission 9 
Academic Policies 12 
Tuition and Fees 17 
Financial Support 19 
Academic Programs 21 
Course Descriptions 83 

Accounting (A) 83 

Civil and Environmental Engineering (CE) 85 

Chemistry (CH) 86 

Criminal Justice (CJ) 86 

Communication (CO) 90 

Economics (EC) 90 

Electrical Engineering (EE) 92 

Executive M.B.A. (EXID) 93 

Finance (Fl) 95 

Hotel/Restaurant Management, Dietetics, and 
Tourism Administration (HM) 96 

Humanities (HU) 97 

International Business (IB) 97 

Industrial Engineering (IE) 98 

Business Law (LA) 101 

Logistics (LG) 101 

Mathematics (M) 102 

Mechanical Engineering (ME) 103 

Management (MG) 104 

Marketing (MK) 106 

Psychology (P) 107 

Public Administration (PA) 109 

Physics (PH) 111 

Philosophy (PL) 111 

PoliHcal Science (PS) 111 

Quantitative Analysis (QA) 113 

Science (SC) 114 

Occupational Safety and Health Management (SH) 

Sociology (SO) 116 

Social Welfare (SW) 117 
Student Services 119 
Board, Administration and Faculty 125 
Index 141 

Campus Map back of book 

Transcript Request form back of book 
Application back of book 



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THE GRADUATE 
SCHOOL 



The Graduate School of the University of New Haven offers master's 
degrees in 23 program areas at eight locations throughout ConnecHcut. 

The main campus in West Haven offers all academic programs, and 
off-campus centers at Waterbury, Danbury, Trumbull, Middletown, 
Wallingford, Groton-New London and Clinton offer courses leading to 
master's degrees in business administration, computer and information 
science and other programs. 

Most Graduate School courses are scheduled during the late 
afternoon, early evenings and on Saturdays to meet the needs of part- 
time, employed students. 

The University of New Haven is fully accredited by the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges. It is also a member of the Council 
of Graduate Schools, the Northeastern Association of Graduate 
Schools, the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, and the National 
Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration. 



Admission 



General 
Requirements 



Applicants to the University of New Haven Graduate School are 
required to have an undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution. Certain programs have additional requirements for 
admission to specific curricula, details of which are included in the 
program listings later in the catalog. 

Admission decisions are based primarily on an applicant's 
undergraduate record. Prospective students who are currently 
completing their undergraduate study should submit an official 
transcript complete to the date of application. In most cases, an 
admission decision will be made on the basis of the partial transcript, 
contingent upon completion of the baccalaureate degree. Registration 
will not be permitted until a final, official transcript is submitted to the 
Graduate School admissions office. 

In support of an application, students may submit their scores from 
the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), both the Aptitude Test and 
the Advanced Test, the Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT) or the Miller Analogies Test. Students may be required to take 
one or more of these tests. 



Procedure 



An applicant for admission to the Graduate School must submit a 
formal application, two letters of recommendation, complete official 
transcripts of all previous college work and the nonrefundable 
application fee. 



Students may be admitted for any term. Should a student be unable 
to enter the Graduate School during the term for which admission is 
granted, the acceptance will remain open for one calendar year. After 
one year, a new application for admission will be required. 



Admission 
Categories 



Applicants and students in the Graduate School are assigned to one 
of three categories: fully matriculated, provisional or special. 

Fully Matriculated 

Students accepted for entrance into a regular degree program are 
fully matriculated students. 

Provisional 

Applicants whose undergraduate average falls below the standard 
set for full matriculation may be accepted provisionally. Students 
accepted provisionally should seek out the advice of their coordinator 
or advisor so that their graduate work can be closely supervised. 

Students must complete the work stipulated in their provisional 
acceptance before they will be evaluated for admission as fully 
matriculated graduate students. 

Special 

Special student status is reserved for students who do not wish to 
matriculate in a program. Registration is limited to 12 credit hours of 
graduate work. Should the student desire to continue graduate work, 
he or she must be accepted into a specific graduate program. Special 
students are responsible for seeing to it that prerequisite requirements 
for the courses they wish to take are met. 

Students who wish to matriculate in a degree program, but complete 
their applications after the stated deadline, should register as in-process 
students to take advantage of advisement in their fields of study. These 
students should not apply for special student status. 

Auditors 

An auditor is allowed to attend class and is expected to participate in 
class discussions and complete the required assignments. An auditor 
receives no grade or credit toward any degree. Auditor status does 
not imply admission to any of the graduate degree programs. Both 
registered students and nonstudents are eligible to audit University of 
New Haven Graduate School courses. 



Admission of 

International 

Students 



Qualified international students are welcome as students in the 
Graduate School of the University of New Haven. 

The major criterion for the admission of international students is the 
same as that used for citizens of the United States: Does the 
undergraduate preparation of the student qualify him or her for 
graduate study in a degree program at the University of New Haven? 
Since institutions and systems of higher education vary from country to 
country, the international applicant may expect that he or she will be 
asked to provide substantiation, not only of the courses taken and 
grades received, but also of the academic reputation of the 
undergraduate school within the educational system of the particular 
country. All transcripts must be provided in English. 



Admission 11 




In addition, the Graduate School requires that the applicant submit 
evidence of English proficiency. The Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) examination is recommended, but if undergraduate 
work has been completed in English or if arrangements for the TOEFL 
are difficult, the GRE or GMAT examinations may be substituted for 
the TOEFL. The Graduate School may also require that evidence of 
English proficiency be ascertained by an overseas interview, any charge 
for which must be borne by the prospective student. 

Every international applicant will be evaluated carefully regarding 
undergraduate subject matter mastery and English proficiency. A 
student whose examination score falls below acceptable standards for 
English proficiency (which in the case of the TOEFL examination is 
500-550) or whose undergraduate work does not provide necessary 
preparation for the parricular program of study chosen in the Graduate 
School, may be admitted subject to the requirement that the course of 
study at the University of New Haven include intensive work in 
English and undergraduate courses, for which no graduate credit will 
be given. 

International applicants for degree programs which require a thesis 
will be evaluated for English language writing skills. Further courses in 
writing skill development may be required. 

International students will need to provide a signed financial 
resource statement together with a $100 refundable deposit or a current 
official scholarship letter prior to the issuance of the 1-20, since the 
university must certify the international student's finances. The 
University of New Haven does not offer financial assistance to 
international students. 

International students are required to pay a one-time international 
student fee of $200 and the tuition for one trimester, usually meaning 
the tuition for three, three-credit courses when they register. 

International students are required to have medical insurance, and 
may elect to purchase the university's student policy if they wish. 

Since the review of applications from international students takes 
much longer than those from citizens of the United States, it is 
important that applications and all supporting materials be received by 
the Graduate School well before the stated deadline in the academic 
calendar. 

U.S. immigration regulations require that students holding a student 
visa maintain adequate progress. Adequate progress means full-time 
study, which is generally interpreted to mean taking at least three 
courses each term, although in certain programs may be less than 
three. ProspecHve international students should, therefore, note that 
not all graduate programs are designed to permit full-time study. A 
complete listing of such programs is provided on page 14. 

The English Language Institute (ELI) at the university offers a wide 
selection of courses in English language skills, as well as a college skills 
workshop for qualified international students. 

Upon acceptance students are invited to contact the director of 
housing for assistance in locating living accommodations. 

The university maintains an international student advisor's office on 
a full-time basis. Upon their arrival at UNH, all international students 
must contact the director of that office within 72 hours. 

Graduate students studying under an F-1 visa are allowed 24 months 
to complete a degree program. All F-1 visa students must register for 
full-time study. Once visa students have completed their degree 



program, the International Student Office will not issue an 1-538 for 
extension of temporary stay, except for periods of practical training 
approved by the Graduate School and the U.S. Office of Immigration. 



Registration 




Registration deadlines are listed in the graduate calendar and in the 
class schedules that are published each term. Returning students and 
new students who have been admitted to programs will receive 
registration materials and can register by mail. Some departments have 
other procedures and will notify the students involved directly. 

Prospective students who complete their apphcations after the stated 
deadline may register as in-process students. They will not receive 
registration materials in the mail but may register in person at the main 
campus or at an off-campus center. Proof that the in-process student 
has an undergraduate degree will be required at the Hme of 
registration, and, whenever possible, unofficial transcripts of previous 
course work should be provided to facilitate advisement. In-process 
status remains in effect for a maximum of one term, and in-process 
students may register for no more than six credits' work without the 
approval of the coordinator of the program for which they are 
applying. 

It is the responsibility of in-process students to see to it that all 
materials in support of their application are received by the university 
in time for a matriculation decision before the next term. In-process 
students will not be permitted to register a second time until a 
matriculation decision has been made. Acceptance as an in-process 
student does not guarantee admission to the Graduate School. 

Any student who fails to register for three consecutive terms will no 
longer receive registration materials. It will be the responsibility of the 
student to notify the Graduate Records Office of his or her desire to 
continue graduate study. Files for students who revert to an inactive 
status will be retained for two years. At the end of that period, those 
files will be destroyed. 

No add slips will be accepted after the first week of class. A student 
may withdraw from a course any Hme prior to the last scheduled class 
meeting. Course additions or withdrawals may be handled in person or 
by mail. 

The university resen'es the right to change class schedules or 
instructors at any time. It further reserves the right to cancel any 
course, and, in such cases, will refund full tuihon to the students. 

Students with an outstanding balance will not be permitted to 
register. Current students who register after the registration deadline 
will be assessed a late registration fee. 



Academic Policies 



Academic 
Counseling 



It is the student's responsibility to select courses in accordance with 
prerequisites, the advisor's recommendations, the departmental plan 
of study (if required) and the requirements for the degree. 

Students needing further explanation about program requirements 
or course sequencing should request academic advisement. 
Appointments for academic counseling should be scheduled through 



Academic Standards 13 

department chairmen or program coordinators. Off-campus 
advisement evenings are held prior to each trimester. 

A student is not required to file a formal plan of study with the 
Graduate School. It is the student's responsibility to meet the stated 
requirements for the degree. 



Academic 
Standards 



The academic standing of each student is determined on the basis of 
the quality point ratio earned each term. 

To determine a quality point, each letter grade earned during a term 
is assigned a quality point value: 

A — Four quality points 
B — Three quality points 
C — Two quality points 
F — Zero quality points 
P — Zero quality points 
S — Zero quality points 
U — Zero quality points 
W — Zero quality points 
I — Zero quality points 
T — Zero quality points 

The quality point ratio is obtained by multiplying the quality point 
value of each grade by the number of semester hours assigned to each 
course in the catalog, then dividing the total quality points carried by 
the total semester hours attempted. 

A cumulative quality point ratio is obtained by calculating the quality 
point ratio for all courses attempted at the University of New Haven. 



Awarding of 
Degrees 




The University of New Haven awards degrees twice a year, at 
commencements in January and in June. 

A quality point raHo of 3.0 is required for graduation. Students 
completing the requirements for a degree at the end of the fall term will 
receive the degree in January. Students completing the requirements 
for a degree at the end of the winter term will receive the degree at the 
June commencement. Students completing the requirements for a 
degree at the end of the spring term will receive the degree the 
following January. Students completing the requirements for a degree 
in July will receive a formal statement that they have completed all 
requirements for the degree and will formally be awarded their diploma 
in January. 

M.B. A. students who have C's in more than three courses will not be 
allowed to graduate. Instead, they will be advised to repeat one or 
more of those courses and must achieve a grade of B or better. 

Candidates for January commencement must file a petition with the 
Graduate Records Office no later than October 15, and for June 
commencement no later than March 1. Forms for this purpose are 
available in the Graduate School Office and in the Office of the 
Registrar. Payment of the graduation fee must accompany the petition. 

Should a candidate not fulfill all the requirements for graduation 
before the deadline after having filed the petition to graduate and paid 
the fee, the student will have to petihon again at a later date. At that 
time, only the refihng fee will be charged. 

All financial obligations to the university must be met prior to 
graduation. 



FuU-Time Study 



Grade Reports 
Grading System 



Graduate School 
Ethics 



A full-time graduate course of study is defined as three courses per 
term. Under unusual circumstances, the department chairperson, the 
program coordinator and the Graduate School could approve a reduc- 
tion in credits. 

Full-time enrollment is possible in the following programs: 
accounting, business administration, community psychology, com- 
uter and information science, criminal justice, electrical engineering, 
environmental engineering, environmental science, forensic science, 
gerontology, industrial engineering, industrial/organizational psychol- 
ogy, industrial relations, mechanical engineering, occupational safety 
and health management, operations research, public administrahon, 
taxation, and the M.B. A. /industrial engineering and M.B.A./M.P.A. 
dual degrees. 

Reports of the final grade in each subject will be mailed to the student 
soon after the close of each term. 

The Graduate School uses the following grading system: 
A — Superior performance 
B — Good performance 
C — Passing performance 
F — Failure 

P — Pass - carries credit hours toward the degree 
S — Satisfactory performance in a non-credit course 
W — Withdrawal from a course 
I — Incomplete - given on rare occasions. A grade of I that is not 

changed within one calendar year automatically reverts to a W. 
T — Used for thesis/seminar project students who have not completed 

work during the term in which they originally registered for the 

course. Students must complete their work within the maximum 

allowable Hme for graduate work. 
U — Unsatisfactory performance in a non-credit course 

Some employers require that a letter grade be awarded if a student is 
to receive tuition reimbursement. It is the student's responsibility to 
inform the faculty member of his or her need for a letter grade. 

It is Graduate School policy that all students are expected to complete 
all course requirements on their own initiative and endeavor, with no 
collaboration unless specifically authorized by an instructor. In 
addition, material used by students but authored by another 
individual, publisher, company, government or organization shall be 
identified as such by appropriate footnotes or references. Violations of 
this policy, either in fact or in spirit, will normally be handled by the 
faculty member involved though they may be grounds for dismissal 
from the Graduate School. Students wishing to appeal the decision of a 
faculty member should contact the Graduate School Office. 

It is the responsibility of the student to meet all classes and take all 
exams on schedule. Faculty have the right to require a standard of 
attendance, even if it conflicts with professional and job-related 
responsibilities of students. Students whose jobs require that they be 
absent from class must realize that it is their responsibility to determine 
whether such absence is permitted by the faculty member involved, 
and to meet their professor's requirements for making up missed work, 
if the professor allows missed time to be made up. 

Professors may assess a make-up examination fee when a student is 
permitted to take an end-of-term examination at a time other than the 
scheduled time except for conflicts caused by the examination 
schedule. 



Grievances 15 

A make-up test fee is assessed when a student is permitted to make 
up an announced test during the term. Both these fees are paid at the 
Business Office. 



Grievance Procedure 



A formal policy for the handling of student grievances is available in 
the Graduate School Office. 



Probation and 
Appeals 



Any graduate student whose cumulative quality point raho (QPR) is 
below 3.0, a B average, will be considered to be on academic probation, 
and may be required to obtain permission from the program 
coordinator before registering for additional course work. A student 
whose cumulative QPR is below 2.7 after complehon of 24 credits will 
be required to withdraw from the Graduate School. 

Appeals concerning directed withdrawal from the Graduate School 
under these circumstances should be directed to the dean of the 
Graduate School, who will in turn refer the appeal to the department 
chairman and/or the responsible administrative unit. 



Repetition of 
Work 



A student may repeat a course, with the new grade superseding the 
old grade in the computation of the quality point ratio. The original 
grade remains on the transcript. 



Research Projects, 
Seminar Projects, 
and Independent 
Study 



Some departments and academic programs require the completion of 
research projects, seminar projects, or independent study rather than 
theses. In these cases, as with a thesis, students must have the written 
approval of their advisors and department chairmen prior to enrolling. 
This is accomplished by completing the form, Proposal for Research 
Projects, Seminar Projects or Independent Studies, and securing required 
approvals. 

Students preparing a research project, seminar project, or 
independent study should follow the guidelines presented in the 
Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects, copies 
of which are available in the office of the Graduate School. 



Residency 
Requirements 



Degree programs have a 30-graduate-credit residency requirement, 
with the exception of the M.B.A./M.S.I.E. and M.B.A./M.P.A. dual 
degree programs which have a 60-graduate-credit residency require- 
ment. Credits toward the residency requirements may be earned at the 
main campus or at the off-campus centers. Students taking classes off- 
campus are reminded that the Graduate School strongly encourages, 
and scheduling limitations frequently require, that you plan on taking 
at least three courses at the main campus. 



Thesis 



A number of preliminary steps are required before registration for 
thesis will be accepted by the graduate registrar. The student completes 
the form. Proposal for Theses, in which the proposed subject, the 
methodology and the hypothesis are described. The student secures 
the approval signature of a faculty member who will serve as advisor. 
The student must also secure the approval of the proposed thesis and 
the thesis advisor by the program coordinator and the dean of the 
Graduate School. Only after the graduate registrar has received the 
signed proposal form will the student be permitted to register for 
thesis. 



A thesis will carry no fewer than six academic credits taken over no 
fewer than two academic terms. A preliminary draft must be presented 
to the advisor at least 45 days prior to commencement. Upon approval 
by the advisor and program coordinator, two final, unbound copies are 
presented to the Graduate School at least three weeks before 
commencement. A thesis must be defended before student's thesis 
committee and the dean of the Graduate School. After the dean of the 
Graduate School approves the thesis, credit is awarded and the thesis is 
deposited in the university library for binding and becomes part of the 
permanent collection. Additional copies may be required by the advisor 
or the program coordinator. 

For guidance in the preparation of theses, graduate students should 
consult A Manual for the Prq^aration of Graduate Theses and Technical 
Projects, copies of which are available in the Graduate School Office. 
Questions not resolved by the instructions should be settled in 
consultation with the advisor and by reference to a standard style 
manual. The Graduate School participates in the University Microfilm 
Masters Program, and outstanding theses will be awarded this 
recognition upon the recommendation of the advisor, the program 
coordinator, or both. 



Time Limit 
for Completion 
of Degree 



Students must complete all the requirements for their degree within 
five years of the date of their initial matriculation in the program. Any 
extension of the time limit can be granted only by the dean of the 
Graduate School after consultation with the appropriate program 
coordinator. 



Transfer Credit 



Transfer credit may be given for graduate courses taken at other 
accredited institutions subject to the following conditions: 

a. the courses were at the graduate level; 

b. each grade was B or better; and 

c. the courses did not fulfill requirements for any other degree 
already earned by the student. 

Graduate students at the university must secure written approval 
before taking courses at another institution if they plan to transfer that 
credit into their UNH program. Course coordination forms are 
available in the Graduate School office for this purpose. 



Waiver of Courses 



Some programs permit waivers of core courses on the basis of 
undergraduate courses taken at accredited institutions. Waivers of 
elective courses are not permitted, nor are waivers based upon 
experience. In such cases, substitution of a more advanced course may 
be allowed. 

For a course to be waived, a student must first secure the written 
approval of the department chairman or a faculty member acting for the 
department chairman in the department in which the waiver is 
requested. 



Tuition and Fees 17 



Tuition and Fees 



The following are the University of New Haven tuition, fees and 
charges which will be effective for the Fall 1983 term. The university 
reserves the right, at any time, to make whatever changes may be 
deemed necessary in admission requirements, fees, charges, tuition, 
regulations and academic programs prior to the start of any class, 
semester, term or session. 



Tuition* 



Nonrefundable Fees 



Tuition, per credit hour $150 

Executive MBA program 10,000 

Non-credit course fee, per course 285 

Auditor, per course 285 

Application Fee $20 

Auditor application fee 20 

New international student fee (one-time fee) 200 

Continuing registration fee 25 

Graduate Student Council fee, per term 3 

Graduation fee 35 

Late filing fee to March 15, Oct. 31 25 

Graduation refiling fee 15 

Laboratory fee 60 

Computer use fee 60 

Late payment fee (after scheduled due date)** 25 

Late registration fee, current students 15 

Registration fee, per term 5 

Senior professional certificate fee 

(payable upon completion of program) 10 

Transcript fee, first copy free 

Additional copies 4 

Fee for dropping a course 5 

Make-up examination fee 5 

Make-up test fee 3 

•Tuition will be higher for 1984-85. 

**A late fee plus a iy2% per month late penalty will be assessed on outstanding 
balances. 



Payment 



Tuition for graduate courses is due at registration. However, the 
university permits graduate students to pay tuition on an installment 
basis, paying one half with the registration form and the balance before 
the first day of the term. All students who have not completed tuition 
payments by the first day of the term will be assessed the late payment 
fee. 

Students are responsible for payment of tuition to the university, 
even though they may be eligible for their employer's tuihon 
reimbursement plan. Students are responsible for making their own 
arrangements with their employers for reimbursement. 



The university withholds the giving of grades, the award of 
diplomas, the issuance of transcripts and the granting of honorable 
dismissal to any student whose account is in arrears. 

The university accepts MasterCard and VISA for payment of tuihon. 



Withdrawal 



To be eligible for a refund of tuition, students must formally notify 
the registrar of their intention to withdraw by completing the 
university withdrawal form and submitting it to the registrar by mail or 
in person. The date of the postmark on mailed withdrawal form, or the 
date of submission on those brought in person, determines the amount 
of the refund, if any, due the student. 



Refunds 



The refund policy for graduate students who withdraw from any 
course or from any program is as follows: 80 percent refund of tuition 
upon formal withdrawal prior to the second regularly scheduled class 
meeting, 60 percent refund of tuihon upon formal withdrawal prior to 
the third regularly scheduled class meettng, 40 percent refund of 
tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the fourth regularly scheduled 
class meeting, 20 percent refund of tuition upon formal withdrawal 
prior to the fifth regularly scheduled class meehng. No refund will be 
made after the fifth regularly scheduled class meeting. 



Living Costs 



Estimated costs for attending the University of New Haven Graduate 
School for the 1983-84 academic year are as follows: 

Single Student 

Tuihon and Fees 
Books and Materials 
Base Living Costs 

Cost per Trimester 

Cost per Year (10 months) 

Married — No Children 

Tuition and Fees 
Books and Materials 
Base Living Costs 

Cost Per Trimester 

Cost Per Year (10 months) 

Additional family members: 



Additional living costs for summer: 



6 Credits 


9 Credits 


12 Credits 


$ 908. 

60. 

2,494. 


$ 1,358. 

90. 

2,494. 


$ 1,808. 

120. 

2,494. 


$ 3,462. 
$10,386. 


$ 3,492. 
$11,826. 


$ 4,422 
$13,266 


$ 908. 

60. 

3,350. 


$ 1,358. 

90. 

3,350. 


$ 1,808. 

120. 

3,350. 


$ 4,318. 
$12,954. 


$ 4,798. 
$14,394. 


$ 5,278. 
$15,834. 


1 Child 

2 Children 

3 Children 


$3,198. 
5,381. 
9,367. 



Single 

Married 

Children 



$1,497. 

$2,011. 

1— $640. 



2— $1,155. 



3— $2,004. 



NOTE: Living costs are based on Estimated BLS Moderate Consumption Budget 
Standards (20-35 age group). 



Financial Aid 19 



Finandal Support 




Financial support is available to graduate students in the form of 
assistantships, fellowships, grants-in-aid, loans and work study. 

Assistantships are competitive appointments. The full-time graduate 
assistant works 20 hours per week and receives compensation and 
partial tuition support. The part-time graduate assistant carries a 
varying work requirement of between 5 and 10 hours per week for 
which the assistant receives compensation, but no tuition support. 
These awards are generally made in the spring of the preceding 
academic year. 

Fellowships are competitive awards made to returning students on 
the basis of outstanding academic achievement. 

Grant-in-aid awards are based upon financial need and require that 
the Graduate and Professional School Financial Aid Service (GAPSFAS) 
application be received by the financial aid office no later than July 1, 
November 15 and February 15, depending upon when the student is 
beginning graduate study. Applications received after these dates can 
be acted upon only as funds permit. 

The state of Connecticut and other states have established loan 
programs offering long-term loans at low interest rates. In Connecticut, 
a full-time graduate student may borrow up to a maximum of $5,000 
each school year. Repayment starts six months after graduation. 
Federal interest benefits cover the full interest while in attendance and 
during the year following graduation. 

Part-time employment is also available to graduate students under 
the college work-study program. The program enables students with 
financial need to work on- or off-campus for a maximum of 20 hours a 
week. 



Application and 
Eligibility 



A GAPSFAS application is required for all forms of support based 
upon need. GAPSFAS applications are available in the financial aid 
office and the Graduate School office. 

GAPSFAS applications are mailed by the student directly to 
GAPSFAS for processing, after which GAPSFAS will forward the 
application to the university. Generally, GAPSFAS requires four weeks 
to process applications before forwarding to the school. Since the 
university must receive the processed application by the deadline date, 
approximately four weeks before the start of the term for which the 
student is seeking aid, students are encouraged to file finandal 
applications early. A list of exact university deadlines is available from 
the financial aid office. 

International students are not eligible for financial assistance based 
upon need, since they must certify availability of sufficient funds at 
time of entry. Students on academic probation are not eligible for 
financial aid. 



w^^ 



ACADEMIC 
PROGRAMS 

Accounting 

Coordinator: Robert E. Wnek, Assistant Professor of Accounting and 
Finance, CPA, J.D., Delaware Law School of Widener College 

The overall objective of the master of science in accounting program 
is to provide a framework for accounting inquiry, devised in structure 
and content from the entire scope and process of accounting-informa- 
tion-based economic decision making. The existence of such a frame- 
work is intended to provide graduate accountants and professional 
practitioners an opportunity to share in the development and assess- 
ment of issues of accounting interest within a decision-making context. 
Accordingly, the M.S. program is structured to receive its objective and 
direcHon from the overall objechve of accounting — providing informa- 
tion useful to the process of economic decision making. 

To accomplish this objective, the M.S. program offers a structure of 
studies designed to provide: 

• an examination of the foundations of economic decision making 
(foundation courses, 18 credits); 

• an analysis of the role and usefulness of accounting information for 
economic decision making (core courses, 15 credits); and 

• an opportunity for further selected specialization from the generally 
recognized branches or divisions of accounting inquiry (electives, 9 
credits). 

Each student, upon entering the program, will be assigned a faculty 
advisor who will assist the student throughout the program of study, 
particularly with the selecrton of suitable electives. The assigned faculty 
advisor will also act as, or assist in the selection of, the student's thesis 
advisor. 

Admission Policy 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an under- 
graduate degree from an accredited institution, preferably, but not 
exclusively, in accounting or in business administration with a major in 
accounting. Persons holding other than the above degrees will be 
required to take a number of selected undergraduate courses. 
Admission is based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate record; 
however, the promise of academic success is the essential factor for 
admission. In support of their applications, persons may submit their 
scores from the GMAT. An applicant may be required to take this test. 

MS ArrniinfinP ^ minimum total of 42 credits on the graduate level will be required 

iVl.O., /\CCOUniirig ^^ ^^^ ^^^ master of science in accounhng. In addihon, selected 

undergraduate courses in accounting may be required of students not 
holding an undergraduate degree in accounting. Individual programs 
of study are determined after a conference with the coordinator. 



Students are advised to consult the coordinator as soon as possible 
after matriculating in the program. 

See page 72 for the senior professional certificate in accounting. 

Thesis 

All students are required to write a thesis. The thesis must show 
ability to organize material in a clear and original manner and present 
well-reasoned conclusions. Students are responsible for selecting a 
topic, approaching a faculty member to serve as chairperson, and 
selecting a committee. The committee must consist of the chairperson 
and one other faculty member. 

The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis 
advisor prior to the end of the fifth week of the term in which the 
candidate expects to complete the requirements for the degree. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply with the Graduate School 
policy on theses detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

Required Courses 

Foundation Courses 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

PI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital 

Market Analysis 3 

PI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

Core Courses 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting or 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 3 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis 3 

A 698-699 Thesis I & II 6 

Electives 9 

Total credits 42 

Elective Courses 

Financial Accounting Specialization 

A 651 Financial Accounting Seminar 3 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 3 

A 653 Accounting for the Not-for-Profit Organization 3 

A 656 International Accounting 3 

FI 649 Security Analysis 3 

Managerial Accounting Specialization^ 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 3 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 3 

A 642 Operational Auditing 3 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 3 

Taxation Specialization 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation 1 3 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 3 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 3 



M.B.A./M.P.A. Dual Degree 35 

Business Administration/ 
Public Administration 
Dual Degree Program 

Coordinator: Lynn H. Monahan, Associate Professor of Criminal 
Justice, Ph.D., University of Oregon 

The M.B.A./M.P.A. dual degree program is designed for those 
students whose interests or career objectives are focused at both the 
public and private sectors of the economy. The program broadly 
stresses the use of management skills and analytic techniques applied 
to business, industrial, governmental and not-for-profit organizations. 

M.B.A./M.P.A. ^^^ ^^^^^ M.B.A./M.P.A. program consists of 72 credit hours. Up to 

* ' ' • • • 12 of these credit hours may be waived on the basis of undergraduate 

Dual Degree course work, leaving a minimum requirement of 60 credit hours. All 

waivers must be approved in writing by the appropriate department 
and are conditional upon subsequent academic performance. 

Graduate credit may be transferred from other accredited institutions 
subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed else- 
where in this catalog. In all cases, the residence requirement for the two 
degrees shall be 60 credit hours completed at the University of New 
Haven. In addition, a minimum of 21 credit hours must be earned in 
business courses and a minimum of 21 credit hours must be earned in 
public administration courses.. 

See page 79 for the senior professional certificate in public 
management. 

Thesis 

All students must write a thesis. The thesis must show ability to 
organize material in a clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the departmental program or a faculty member with special 
competence in the subject matter covered by the thesis. The complete 
and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis advisor prior to 
the end of the tenth week of the term in which the candidate expects to 
complete the requirements for the degree. 

Thesis preparation and submission must comply with Graduate 
School policy on thesis requirements detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 



Required Courses 

PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 3 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation 3 

PA 604 Communities and Social Change 3 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining 

in the Public Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior, or 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

MK 609 MarkeHng 3 

FI 615 Finance 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

Electives (Public Administration) 9 

Electives (Business) 9 

Thesis I & II 6 

Total credits 72 




Community Psychology 



Coordinator: Robert J. Hoffnung, Professor of Psychology, 
Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

Community psychology begins with the assumption that human 
problems occur within a social context and that the most effective 
interventions into these problems are those that take place within a 
community framework. 

Accordingly, the M.A. program in community psychology provides 
broad training in current approaches to preventing and treating psy- 
chological distress at the level of social institutions, organizations and 
groups rather than just the individual. Methods of community 
analysis, consultation and crisis intervention are considered as well as 
program development, administration and evaluation. 

Classroom study is closely integrated with supervised field exper- 
iences in a variety of human service organizations and community 
settings. 

Graduates are able to assume positions of responsibility in a broad 
range of human service settings, such as mental health programs, 
youth service bureaus, community houses, child development 
programs, municipal services, halfway houses, senior citizen centers, 
private agencies, health care systems and community acHon programs. 

We welcome fuU- and part-time students with varying degrees of 
human service experience. 



Community Psychology 37 

Admission Policy 

An undergraduate degree from an accredited institution is required. 
A major in psychology is preferred but not required. However, all 
students are expected to have at least an introductory level under- 
standing of psychological concepts, principles and methods before 
entering. Students who have not had an undergraduate course in 
staHsHcal methods will be required to take one before entry into P 609. 
We prefer students with strong academic records but welcome appli- 
caHons from students whose work and related experiences suggest 
potential for success in community psychology. 

Applicants are required to submit materials directly to the Graduate 
School. They may be required to submit scores from either the Miller 
Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Examinations ApHtude Test, 
at the discretion of the department. Students intending to go on for 
hirther graduate work are strongly encouraged to take the GRE early in 
the first year. 

Practicum Seminars and Field Work 

Supervised field experience in a variety of settings represents a major 
component of the M.A. program in community psychology. Students 
plan their field work activities under the guidance of both the 
program's field placement coordinator and their supervisor from the 
field setting. In order to maximize the potential for learning inherent in 
these experiences, all students take practicum seminars whose content 
reflects the focus of their field work activities. These seminars enable 
students to conceptualize issues that they encounter in the field within 
a broader theoretical framework. 

Students with a year or more of appropriate full-time human service 
experience in a particular field work area will be allowed to substitute 
an elective for the field work, contingent upon approval of the program 
coordinator. All shadents are required to take the three practicum 
seminars. 

Thesis 

Students who elect to write a thesis must register for P 698, Thesis I, 
and P 699, Thesis 11. The thesis must show ability to organize materials 
in a clear and original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 
A thesis is strongly recommended for students wishing to pursue 
doctoral training after graduation. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the thesis seminar or a faculty member with special 
competence in the subject area of the thesis. The complete and final 
manuscript must be submitted to the thesis advisor prior to the end of 
the tenth week of the term in which the candidate expects to complete 
the requirements for the degree. 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer credit may be given for graduate course work completed at 
other accredited institutions, subject to the Graduate School policy 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 



M.A., Community 
Psychology 



The program consists of 42 credit hours, 24 of which are of the core 
curriculum completed by all students and 12 of which conshtute one of 
two areas of concentration. On entering the program, each student 
chooses one of the concentration options. Typically, students complete 
most of the core requirements before focusing on their concentration. 

See page 73 for the senior professional certificate in applications of 
psychology. 

Required Courses 

P 605 Survey of Community Psychology 3 

P 609 Research Methods 3 

P 610 Program Evaluation 3 

P 611 PracHcum Seminar I: The Dyadic Relationship 3 

P 614 Field Work I 2 

P 612 PracHcum Seminar II: Models of Consultation 3 

P 615 Field Work II 2 

P 613 PracHcum Seminar III: Systems Intervenhon 3 

P 616 Field Work III 2 

ElecHves 6 

ConcentraHon 12 

Total credits 42 



Concentration in 
Community-Clinical" 



The Community-CUnical concentration is designed to prepare 
students for careers in clinical, mental health, and related human 
service settings. Direct work with individuals within the social and 
community contexts in which they live as well as consultation, social 
problem analysis and prevention techniques and strategies are 
stressed. 



P 621 Behavior Modification 3 

P 625 Developmental Psychology 3 

P 628 The Interview 3 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 3 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 3 

P 634 Personality Assessment 3 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 3 

Total credits 12 

'Students will choose four courses from those offered within a single 
concentration. 



Concentration in 
Community 
Organization 
and Program 
Administration* 



The Community Organization and Program Administration 
concentration is designed to prepare students for careers which 
emphasize the administration of traditional and non-traditional 
programs and services and the planning and development of 
innovative approaches to treatment and prevention at the community, 
organizational and social systems levels. 



'Students will choose four courses from those offered within a single 
concentration. 



Computer & Information Science 39 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 3 

P 631 Social Psychology 3 

P 650 Ecological Psychology 3 

PA 604 Communities and Social Change 3 

Total credits 12 



Computer and Information 
Science 



Coordinator: Roger G. Frey, Associate Professor, Industrial 
Engineering, Ph.D., Yale University 

The master of science in computer and information science cur- 
riculum is an interdisciplinary program with a software orientation. It is 
designed to provide a high-level academic background for CIS 
managers and systems analysts in all career areas. A wide selection of 
electives allows students to concentrate in either technical or business 
applications. 



M.S., Computer and 
Information Science 




The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. Required courses may 
be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses taken at accredited 
institutions. 

All waivers must be approved in writing by the industrial engi- 
neering department and are conditional upon subsequent academic 
performance. The transfer of credit from other institutions will be 
permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

For students with little background in computers and programming 
(no more than one prior course), IE 602 Computing Fundamentals is 
required; elective credit will be awarded for the course. 

Seminar Project 

The program requires all students to complete IE 690 Seminar 
Project. This requirement is met by the preparation of a relevant 
seminar project report, prepared under the direction of a faculty 
advisor. The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the 
project advisor prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which 
the candidate expects to complete the requirements for the degree. For 
further specifications, see Research Projects, Seminar Projects and 
Independent Study Requirements detailed elsewhere in this catalog. It is 
suggested that a student begin work on the seminar project after 
having completed at least 15 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar to 
the required seminar project as a part of their professional duties may 
petition to satisfy the seminar project requirement by taking two ad- 
vanced industrial engineering electives in place of the project. Such a 
substitution must have the prior written approval of the program 
coordinator. 

See page 73 for the senior professional certificate in computer 
applications and information systems. 



Required Courses 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 603C Introduction to Digital Computers (COBOL), or 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 605 Advanced Business Programming, or 

IE 606 Advanced Technical Programming 3 

IE 610 Computer Systems Selection 3 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

EE 615 Introduction to Computer Logic 3 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra 3 

Electives (I.E., Math, or E.E.) 9 

Electives 12 

Total credits 48 



Crirninal Justice 




Director: Lynn H. Monahan, Associate Professor of Criminal Justice, 
Ph.D., University of Oregon 

A key objective of the master of science in criminal justice program is 
the training and education of men and women planning careers in the 
field of criminal justice as well as the advanced training and education 
of the men and women who staff the agencies and institutions of the 
criminal justice system. 

The program stresses a broad understanding of the social and be- 
havioral sciences, the institutions of the criminal justice system, and 
the development of methodological tools and skills. This is done 
somewhat at the expense of courses that are narrowly professional in 
the belief that the field of criminal justice is dynamic and that a broad 
understanding of the social and behavioral sciences and the method- 
ological skills and tools will prove more valuable to a student's career in 
the long run than narrow professional training. 

The broad fields of the criminal justice program at the university are 
social and behavioral science, the institutions of the criminal justice 
system and methodological tools and skills. 

The courses in the area of social and behavioral science stress the 
theories of the behavior of man in a social order and the sanctions 
imposed by different societies to control the social behavior of their 
members. 

Courses in the area of criminal justice institutions stress the study of 
the existing system from the police, through the courts, the peniten- 
tiaries, and the system of probation and parole. 

The methodological courses expose students to the tools of research 
and analysis and the contribution of systems analysis to the efficient 
administration of the criminal justice system. 



Criminal Justice 41 



M.S., Criminal 
Justice 



A total of 45 credit hours is required of candidates for the degree of 
master of science of criminal justice. 

Candidates must complete required credit hours of required courses 
in the core curriculum. After consultation with their advisor, students 
select credit hours of electives from approved courses in the depart- 
ments of criminal justice, economics, psychology, political science, 
sociology, industrial engineering and management science. 

The transfer of credit from other institutions will be permitted subject 
to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in 
this catalog. 

Applicants are also required to complete a queshonnaire to be sub- 
mitted directly to the Graduate School. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis credit with 
the department. The thesis must show ability to organize material in a 
clear and original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the departmental thesis program or a faculty member with 
special competence in the subject matter covered by the thesis. The 
complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis advisor 
prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the student 
expects to complete the requirements for the degree. 

Thesis preparahon and submission must comply with the Graduate 
School policy on theses detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

Required Courses 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 605 Social Deviance 3 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 3 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 3 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 3 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 3 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration 3 

Electives (Approved) 24 

Total credits 45 



Concentrations 



In addition to the master of science degree program in criminal 
justice, there are three concentrations that a student may choose to 
elect — criminal justice management, correctional counseling, and 
security management. 



Concentration in 
Criminal Justice 
Management 



This concentration is designed for those individuals wishing to 
pursue a career in the management of a criminal justice agency. 
Courses are offered jointly between the criminal justice and the public 
administration programs. 



CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 3 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 3 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems Theory 3 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public Sector 3 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration 3 

CJ 655 Bureaucratic Organization of Criminal Justice 3 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation 3 

PA 604 Communities and Social Change 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective 

Bargaining in the Public Sector 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

Electives (Approved) 12 

Total credits 45 



Concentration in 

Correctional 

Counseling 



This program, offered jointly between the criminal justice program 
and the Department of Psychology, is designed for those individuals 
currently in correctional counseling positions or those who anticipate a 
career in correctional counseling. 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 3 

CJ 622 Learning Theory: Applications in Criminal Justice 3 

CJ 624 Group Process in Criminal Justice 3 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice Internship 1 3 

P 611 Prachcum Seminar I: 

The Dyadic Relationship 3 

P 618 Community Mental Health Philosophy and Concepts .... 3 

P 628 The Interview ' 3 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 3 

Electives* — Criminal Justice 9 

Electives* — Psychology 9 

Total credits 45 

* Electives will be chosen by consent of advisor. Students may be required to take 
C] 694 — Internship II, depending upon experience, ability, and background. 



Concentration in 

Security 

Management 



This concentration is designed for those individuals who are 
pursuing or wish to pursue careers in security management within 
business or industry. Course work stresses a broad interaction between 
security, business administration, fire sciences and criminal justice. 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 3 

CJ 605 Social Deviance 3 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 3 

CJ 614 Survey of Forensic Science 3 

CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Prevention of 

Structural Fires 3 

CJ 675 Private Security Law 3 

CJ 676 Security Managerhent Seminar 3 

CJ 677 Private Security in Modern Society 3 

SH 602 Safety Organization and Administration 3 

Electives (Approved) 12 



Electrical Engineering 43 

and two courses from among: 

CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in Criminal Justice 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

Total credits 45 



Professional 
Certificate in 
Security 
Management 



This certificate is designed for those professionals who wish to 
enhance their knowledge and skills in security management. 

Admission into the professional certificate program in security 
management is open to all persons who hold an undergraduate degree 
from an accredited institution of higher education. 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice Management 3 

CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Prevention of 

Structural Fires 3 

CJ 675 Private Security Law 3 

CJ 676 Security Management Seminar 3 

CJ 677 Private Security in Modern Society 3 

SH 602 Safety Organization and Administration 3 

Total credits 18 



Electrical Engineering 



HIKIIIS 






4W Vi^Mirii ;.H 



\ \^^'\ him — "" 



•yw;kw.^- 



Coordinator: Gerald j. Kirwin, Professor of Electrical Engineering, 
Ph.D., Syracuse University 

This program is intended to meet the needs of professionally 
employed engineers and scientists for academic work beyond the 
baccalaureate level. It has been designed to deepen the understanding 
of modern analysis and synthesis techniques as they apply to engi- 
neering design. A major goal of this program is to provide a discussion 
of the characteristics of the latest devices and systems and of their 
applications in current engineering design. Both analytical and 
numerical procedures are developed with particular emphasis on the 
use of computers for problem solving and as elements in larger 
systems. 

The program centers on a core sequence which all students are 
expected to take. The core courses contain advanced methods of 
analysis and design which are of common interest to electrical 
engineers. Each student completes a program by electing courses that 
are particularly suited to current personal interests. In general the 
elective courses must be courses from those listed below. Early in the 
program the student, with the help and approval of an advisor, pre- 
pares a detailed plan ensuring an overall educational experience that is 
integrated and logical. All decisions regarding both core and elective 
courses are subject to the final approval of the student's advisor. 



Admission Policy 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an under- 
graduate engineering degree from an institution accredited by the Ac- 
crediting Board for Engineering and Technology. Though admission 
decisions are based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate record, 
the promise of academic success is the essential factor for admission. 



M.S., Electrical 
Engineering 



A minimum total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the 
master of science in electrical engineering degree. The transfer of credit 
from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

Thesis 

There is no specific thesis requirement for the master of science in 
electrical engineering. However, students are encouraged to submit a 
thesis proposal covering applied research in an area of mutual interest 
to the student and a supervising member of the faculty. If a proposal 
shows promise of yielding a worthwhile contribution to the profes- 
sional objecHves of the student, and a faculty member accepts the role 
of supervisor, the student may embark upon the research and earn six 
elective credits. Students electing to do a thesis project will be expected 
to make an oral presentation of the results of the project. 

The complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the thesis 
advisor prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the 
candidate expects to complete the requirements for the degree. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply with the Graduate School 
policy on theses detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

The thesis is deposited permanently in the library. Students are 
required to submit two copies of the thesis for the library. Additional 
copies of the thesis are usually required. For this requirement and other 
regulations regarding the preparation of a thesis, students should con- 
sult the Manual for the Preparation of Graduate Theses and Seminar Projects. 
Copies of the manual are available in the Graduate School office. 



Required Courses 

EE 603 Discrete and Continuous Systems I 3 

EE 604 Discrete and Continuous Systems II 3 

EE 630 Electronic Instrumentation I 3 

EE 640 Computer Engineering I 3 

EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 3 

IE 685 Theory of OpHmization 3 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 3 

M 624 Applied MathemaHcs 3 

M 632 Methods of Complex Analysis 3 

Electives (Approved) 12 

Total credits 39 



Environmental Engineering 45 

Elective Courses 

EE 605 Modern Control Systems 3 

EE 608 Computer Aided Design 3 

EE 631 Electronic Instrumentation II 3 

EE 634 Digital Signal Processing 1 3 

EE 635 Digital Signal Processing II 3 

EE 641 Computer Engineering II 3 

EE 645 Power Systems Engineering 1 3 

EE 646 Power Systems Engineering II 3 

EE 658 Microprocessors — Theory and Applications 3 

EE 670 Special Topics — Electrical Engineering 3 

EE 695 Independent Study I 3 

EE 696 Independent Study II 3 

EE 698-699 Thesis I and II 6 



Environmental Engineering 




Coordinator: George R. Carson, Associate Professor of Civil 
Engineering, M.S.C.E., Columbia University 

The environmental engineering program is intended to meet the 
needs of engineers for academic work beyond the baccalaureate level. 
The program is interdisciplinary in nature and incorporates both 
engineering and science courses. 

There exists today a need for a substantial number of engineers 
knowledgeable in environmental areas. Industries that are required to 
control the pollution of air and water need environmental engineers. 
Federal, state and local governments must hire employees and con- 
sultants to assist them in environmental matters. Other new vistas will 
undoubtedly open to the environmental engineers in the future. 
Environmental engineers will be in increasingly greater demand with 
the continually increasing problems of pollution. 

The recognihon and solution of environmental problems are largely 
the responsibility of engineers and scientists. To perform effectively in 
this massive effort, they must be technically competent as well as 
knowledgeable in social and economic matters. 

This program provides the advanced educational skills necessary to 
meet the ever increasing need for engineers with an environmental 
background. It is designed to offer vigorous, professionally oriented, 
engineering and science courses in the areas of solid waste, water and 
air pollution. 

Approximately two-thirds of the program consists of a required 
sequence of courses which each student must complete. The balance 
of the program consists of courses selected from the list of electives. 
Selection will be based on the student's principal field of interest. Each 
student, upon entering this program, will be assigned a faculty advisor 
who will consult with the student during the program of study and will 
assist the student in selection of suitable electives. The faculty advisor 
will also act as the student's research project advisor. 



Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission in the environmental engineering pro- 
gram are expected to have an engineering degree from an institution 
accredited by the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology. 



M.S., Environmental 
Engineering 



A total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the master of 
science in environmental engineering degree. The transfer of credit 
from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

Required Courses 

CE 601 Water Treatment 3 

CE 602 Wastewater Treahnent 3 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 3 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation, or 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

CE 612 Advanced Wastewater Treatment 3 

CE 613 Industrial Wastewater Control 3 

CE 690 Research Project 3 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 3 

SC 601 Introduction to Ecology 3 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment, or 

SC 603 Air Pollution 3 

Elective (CE) 3 

Electives (Approved) 6 

Total credits 39 



Environmental Science 



Coordinator: Charles L. Vigue, Associate Professor of Science and 
Biology, Ph.D., North Carolina State University 

The environmental science program is intended to meet the needs of 
scientists for academic work in environmental studies beyond the bac- 
calaureate level. The program is interdisciplinary in nature and incor- 
porates science and engineering courses. This program is designed to 
accommodate the student with a degree in one of the natural sciences. 

There exists today a need for a substantial number of scientists 
knowledgeable in environmental areas. Industries that are required to 
control the pollution of air and water need environmental scientists. 
Federal, state and local governments must hire employees and con- 
sultants to assist them in environmental matters. Other new vistas will 
undoubtedly open to the environmental scientists of the future. 
Environmental scientists will be in increasingly greater demand with 
the continually increasing problems of pollution. 

This program provides the advanced educational skills necessary to 
meet the ever increasing need for scientists with an environmental 
background. It is designed to offer vigorous, professionally oriented 
science and engineering courses in the areas of solid waste, water and 
air pollution. 



M.S., Environmental 



Executive MBA. 47 

Approximately two-thirds of the program consists of a required se- 
quence of courses that each student must complete. The balance of the 
program consists of courses selected from a list of electives. Selection 
will be based on the student's principal field of interest. Each student, 
upon entering this program, will be assigned a faculty advisor who will 
consult with the student during the program of study and will assist in 
selection of suitable electives. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the environmental science program 
would be expected to have a degree in one of the natural sciences in 
which certain prerequisite courses have been completed. Students 
without these courses would be admitted to the program after com- 
pleting these prerequisites. 

A total of 39 credit hours must be completed to earn the master of 
science in environmental science degree. The transfer of credit earned 
Science a* other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School 

policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

Required Courses 

CE 601 Water Treatment, or 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 3 

CE 605 Solid Waste Management 3 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation, or 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 3 

SC 601 Introduction to Ecology 3 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic Environment 3 

SC 603 Air Pollution 3 

SC 608 Water Quality 3 

SC 610 General Environmental Health 3 

SC 612 Freshwater Ecology 3 

SC 613 Marine Ecology 3 

SC 698-699 Thesis I and II or 

Electives (approved) 6 

Total credits 39 



Executive Master of 
Business Administration 



Director of Executive Development: Willard M. Salzer, 
M.A., University of Colorado 

The Graduate School and the School of Business offer a master of 
business administration degree for high-level executives with extensive 
managerial experience. The program is designed specifically in con- 
sideration of managerial responsibilities and existing time constraints. 




The EMBA degree program is a two-year, part-time degree program 
organized to meet the educational needs and executive responsibili- 
ties of corporate and institutional leaders. Individual participation is 
emphasized through class discussions and cooperation with others in 
the class. Each class is generally limited to between 15 and 20 students. 
Class members commence and conclude the program as a group. 
Courses are offered in downtown New Haven and Stamford. 

No graduate transfer credit is accepted into the EMBA program. 
Admission to the EMBA degree program is by special application, the 
form for which may be obtained from the EMBA program director. 
Classes commence in September and January, providing a sufficient 
number of qualified applicants have applied from which proper selec- 
tion may be made. An admission committee screens the applications to 
insure proper selection. A personal interview with the admissions 
committee is required. Factors such as current position, length of top- 
management experience, and prior formal education are important 
factors in the selection process. The selecrion committee attempts to 
provide from among the applicants those individuals who will bring a 
diverse grouping of managerial skills and experiences, thereby allow- 
ing the students to learn from each other as well as from the faculty. 

Upon completion of the program, participants will be awarded the 
degree of master of business administration (the executive program). 

Information concerning admission procedures and the academic 
calendar may be obtained by writing to the EMBA program director. 



Executive M.B.A. 



The program consists of 20 courses scheduled into two ten-month 
academic calendar years. Each course is four sessions in length. All 
classes meet one afternoon/early evening per week in designated off- 
campus conference facilities for participant convenience. Participants 
must agree in advance to attend all classes except for emergencies. 
Students must be prepared to devote additional time for class prepara- 
hon and reading assignments. 

Required Courses 

The courses in the Executive M.B.A. program are listed below in the 
order in which they are taken. 



EXID 903 The Communication Process VA 

Quantitative Group 

EXID 936 StaHsHcs and Forecasting VA 

EXID 915 QuantitaHve Decision Making VA 

EXID 918 Managerial Economics VA 

EXID 939 Operations Research and Management VA 

EXID 960 Computers and Management VA 

Industrial Relations Croup 

EXID 909 Business and Government Relations VA 

EXID 948 Labor and Management Relations VA 

EXID 945 Human Resources Management VA 



Forensic Science 49 

Finance Group 

EXID 924 Financial Management I V/i 

EXID 927 Financial Management II V/2 

EXID 912 Financial Accounting V/2 

EXID 942 Managerial Accounting IV2 

Marketing Group 

EXID 933 International Business IV2 

EXID 930 Marketing Management IV2 

EXID 951 Marketing Management Seminar V/i 

Management Group 

EXID 906 The Management Process V/2 

EXID 954 Organizational Development IV2 

EXID 957 Corporate Policy and Strategy l'/2 

EXID 921 Executive Development Seminar V/2 

Total credits 30 



Forensic Sdence 



Director: RE. Gaensslen, Professor of Forensic Science, 
Ph.D., Cornell University 

Forensic science is a broad, interdisciplinary field in which the 
natural sciences are employed to analyze and evaluate physical 
evidence in matters of the law. The interdisciplinary forensic science 
program has these concentrations: criminalistics, fire science and 
advanced investigation. In addition to the M.S. degree programs, 
professional certificates are offered in all the specialties for those who 
require only the specialized courses. The criminalistics program pro- 
vides the advanced technical background for professional laboratory 
examiners and those wishing to enter the criminalistics field. The 
fire science program provides advanced training in arson scene 
investigation, laboratory analysis of arson-related evidence, and related 
aspects of arson and fire investigation. The advanced investigation 
program provides advanced training in the forensic sciences and in 
investigation techniques, and is designed for students interested in 
idenhficahon, crime-scene, investigative and other field work. 

The program and courses stress not only up-to-date analytical and 
scientific methods, but also a broad understanding of the concepts 
underlying the forensic sciences. Degree programs in this program 
require a sequence of core courses, followed by concentration re- 
quirement courses, and a flexible offering of electives designed to meet 
individual needs. 



Admission Policy 

For admission to the criminalistics concentration in the M.S. in 
forensic science program, students must have an undergraduate 
degree in a natural science field. In addition, applicants are required to 
take the Graduate Record Examination (G.R.E.) and submit their scores 
to the Graduate School. 

For admission to the fire science or advanced investigation concen- 
tration in the M.S. in forensic science program, students must have a 
baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution. The degree need 
not be in natural sciences, and the G.R.E is not required. 



M.S., Forensic 
Science 



Candidates are required to complete 40 credit hours of graduate 
v^ork, which may include an internship in a forensic science laboratory. 
Transfer of credit from other institutions may be permitted subject to 
the Graduate School policy on transfer credit detailed elseufhere in this 
catalog. 

Required Courses 

CJ 614 Survey of Forensic Science 3 

CJ 620 Advanced Criminalistics I 3 

CJ 640 Advanced Criminalistics 11 3 

CJ 653 Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 3 

CJ 673 Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science 3 

Total credits 15 



Concentration in 
Criminalistics 



CJ621 
CJ641 
CJ 654 
CJ674 
CJ693 
CJ690 



CJ660 
CJ663 
Q664 
CJ661 
CJ662 
CH621 



Advanced Criminalistics I 1 

Advanced Criminalistics II 1 

Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 1 

Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science 1 

Criminal Justice Internship I, or 

Research Project I 3 

Electives 10-11 

Plus tivo from among: 

Forensic Microscopy 4 

Advanced Forensic Serology I 4 

Advanced Forensic Serology II 4 

Medicolegal Investigation and Identification 3 

Forensic Toxicology 4 

Chemical Forensic Analysis with Laboratory 4 

Total credits 40 



Forensic Science Concentrations 51 



Concentration in 

Advanced 

Investigation 



Concentration in 
Fire Science 



CJ 616 Advanced Crime Scene Investigation 3 

C] 632 Advanced Investigation I 3 

CJ 633 Advanced Investigation II 3 

Electives 13 

Plus one from among: 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 3 

PS 605 Criminal Law _3 

Total credits 40 

CJ 665 Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson Investigation 3 

CJ 649 Fire Scene Investigation and Arson Analysis 4 

CH 625 Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 3 

Electives 12 

Plus one from among: 

CJ 667 Fire and Building Codes, Standards, and Practices 3 

CJ 668 Fire and Casualty Insurance Practices 3 

CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and Prevention of 

Structural Fires _3 

Total credits 40 




Elective Courses 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

CJ 670 Selected Issues in Criminal Justice 

CJ 693 Internship 

CJ 697-699 Thesis 

CJ 695 Independent Study 

CJ 690-691 Research Project I & II 

CJ 675 Private Security Law 

CJ 676 Security Management Seminar 

CJ 677 Private Security in Modern Society 

SH 602 Safety Organization and Administration 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 

SH 630 Product Safety and Liability 

In addition, courses in lists from which two or more must be taken 
may be taken as electives. Courses listed as requirements for one of the 
concentrations may be taken as electives for other concentrations with 
the permission of the director of the program. 

Students in the advanced investigation concentration will be en- 
couraged to take either CJ 610 Administration of Justice, or CJ 651 
Problems in the Administration of Justice as an elective. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for thesis credit with 
the department. The thesis must show an ability to organize material in 
a clear and original manner, and present well-reasoned conclusions. 
Thesis preparation and submission must comply with Graduate School 
regulations detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 



Professional Certificate Programs 

Admission into the professional certificate program in criminalistics, 
fire science and advanced investigation is open to all persons who hold 
an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution of higher 
education. 



Professional 
Certificate in 
Forensic Science/ 
Criminalistics 



Professional 
Certificate in 
Forensic Science/ 
Fire Science 



Professional 
Certificate in 
Forensic Science/ 
Advanced 
Investigation 



CJ620 
CJ621 
CJ640 
CJ 641 
CJ 673 
CJ674 
CJ653 
CJ654 



CJ614 
CJ610 
CH 621 
CH631 



CJ640 
CJ653 
CJ665 
CJ649 



CJ614 
CJ667 
CJ668 
CJ 669 

CJ693 
CH625 



CJ614 
CJ 616 
CJ632 
CJ633 



CJ620 
CJ 640 
CJ673 
CJ653 
CJ 661 
CJ608 
PS 605 



Advanced Criminalistics I 3 

Advanced CriminalisHcs I 1 

Advanced Criminalistics II 3 

Advanced Criminalistics II 1 

Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science 3 

Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science 1 

Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 3 

Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 1 

and one from among the following: 

Survey of Forensic Science 3 

Administration of Justice 3 

Chemical Forensic Analysis with Laboratory 4 

Advances in Analytical Chemistry 3 

Total credits 19 or 20 

Advanced Criminalistics II 3 

Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 3 

Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson Investigation 3 

Fire Scene Investigation and Arson Investigation 4 

and two from among the following: 

Survey of Forensic Science 3 

Fire and Building Codes, Standards and Practices 3 

Fire and Casualty Insurance Practices 3 

Dynamics, Evaluation and Prevention of 

Structural Fires 3 

Criminal Justice Internship 1 3 

Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 3 

Total credits 19 

Survey of Forensic Science 3 

Advanced Crime Scene Investigation 3 

Advanced Investigation I 3 

Advanced Investigation II 3 

and two from among the following: 

Advanced Criminalistics I 3 

Advanced Criminalistics II 3 

Biomedical Methods in Forensic Science 3 

Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 3 

Medicolegal Investigation and Identification 3 

Law and Evidence 3 

Criminal Law 3 

Total credits 18 



Gerontology 53 



M.A., Gerontology 



Gerontology 



Coordinator: Judith Bograd Gordon, Associate Professor of Sociology, 
Ph.D., University of Michigan 

The gerontology program is designed for both the practicing 
professional and those interested in the field of gerontology. 

Gerontology is an interdisciplinary field. The core curriculum 
exposes students to the fundamental insights and perspectives 
of sociology, social welfare, political science, psychology and 
administration, and aids students to compare and contrast these 
disciplines. The program is designed to expose students to crucial skills 
necessary to function effectively as gerontological professionals and to 
prepare them to pursue leadership roles in the field. 

The gerontology program is suitable for government employees, 
health care professionals and program administrators working in the 
field of aging, and for those considering such careers now or in the 
future. 

See page 75 for the senior professional certificate in gerontology. 

Admission Requirements 

Prospective students must fulfill the admission requirements of the 
Graduate School. In addition, they may be required to fulfill additional 
requirements set by the Committee on Studies in Gerontology. 



Each degree candidate will complete an 18-hour core curriculum, and 
either the 21-hour concentration in psycho-social studies or the 21-hour 
concentration in administrative studies. A total of 39 credit hours is 
required for the degree. The transfer of credit from other institutions 
will be permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on transfer 
credit detailed elsewhere in this catalog. All waivers must be approved 
in writing by the program coordinator. 

Required Courses 

SO 651 Social Gerontology* 3 

SO 652 Seminar in Gerontology* 3 

P 672 Psychology of the Middle and Later Years 3 

PA 644 Administration of Programs and Services for the Aged ... 3 

PS 633 The Political Process and the Aged 3 

SC 642 Physical Aging 3 

Concentration 21 

Total credits 39 

'Students are expected to take SO 651 Social Gerontology early in their studies 
and SO 652 toward the end of the program. 



Concentration in 

Administrative 

Studies** 



P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

PA 604 Communities and Social Change 3 

PA 641 Financial Management of Health Care Organizations .... 3 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 3 

A management science elective, by advisement 3 

Electives, by advisement 6 

Total credits 21 

** Students with no prior supervised working experience in gerontology are 
strongly advised to undertake a field work practicum. 



Concentration in 

Psycho-social 

Relations** 



so 641 
SW651 



SW652 



P623 
P625 
P630 
P632 
P636 



Death and Suicide 3 

Social Work with the Elderly I; 

Individuals, Families and Groups 3 

Human Services v^fith the Elderly II: 

Programs, Planning, Policies 3 

Plus four courses from the following: 

Psychology of the Small Group 3 

Developmental Psychology 3 

Psychology of Personality 3 

Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 3 

Abnormal Psychology 3 

Elective 3 

Total credits 21 



** Students with no prior supervised working experience in gerontology are 
strongly advised to undertake a field work practicum. 




Humanities 



Coordinator: David E.E. Sloane, Professor of English, Ph.D., 
Duke University 

The M.A. in humanities emphasizes individual understanding and 
personal thought. A single course in areas of English, history, sociol- 
ogy, or another field in the arts and sciences is offered each trimester; 
students are otherwise encouraged to develop tutorials and seminars or 
investigate other areas of the graduate school curriculum. Our goal is 
increased personal sensitivity to the surrounding world through 
growth in a personally designed curriculum. 

The basic course is typically offered on a weekday evening to 
accommodate adult learners. Each course is intended to challenge 
students to consider their own ethical decisions. 



Industrial Engineering 55 

l-IiimanHip« Thirty hours of course work, including six hours devoted to a thesis 

numaimie!* ^^ portfolio developed in close consultation with a UNH faculty 

member, are required for an M.A. in humanities. 

Recent seminars include: "Ethics and Humor: The Urban Northeast 
1830-1890"; "Social Welfare in Classical Greece and Rome"; "Literature 
and Visual Arts"; "Eli Whitney and the Federal Dream"; "Death and 
Aging." Thesis and independent study topics have included "Mark 
Twain"; "Business Ethics"; "The Role of the Jewish Mother"; "The 
Navajo Code Talkers"; "Teretzin Concentration Camp in WW 11"; "The 
American Negro Spiritual"; "Balinese Music at the Paris Exposition"; 
"Anatomical Drawing"; and "Biological Illustration." 

Required Courses 

HU 606 Humanism and Its Methodology 3 

One course in the evolution of human thought in history: 
HU 601-2; 611; 616; 621; 626; or 661-669 or equivalent . . 3 
One course in values and ethics: 
HU 631; 636; 638; 641; 671-679 or equivalent 3 

HU 698-699 Thesis I and II 6 

Elective seminars, colloquia, and Independent Study ... 15 

Total credits 30 



Industrial Engineering 



Coordinator: Ira H. Kleinfeld, Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Eng. Sc.D., Columbia University 

The master of science in industrial engineering is considered a fifth- 
year or professional degree, and is designed to provide a broad back- 
ground in operations research, man-machine systems and human 
factor analysis. 

Admission Policy 

Admission to the program is open to persons holding an under- 
graduate degree in engineering from a program accredited by the Ac- 
creditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). In some 
cases, an applicant with a degree in a related field may be considered 
for admission. Applicants with degrees in fields other than industrial 
engineering will be required to take a number of undergraduate 
courses or otherwise demonstrate proficiency in several areas normally 
included in an industrial engineering program. 

Though admission decisions are based primarily on an applicant's 
undergraduate record, the promise of academic success is the essential 
factor for admission. 



M.S., Industrial 
Engineering 



l*^!! 



The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. The transfer of credit 
from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this catalog. Required 
courses may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses taken at 
accredited institutions. All waivers must be approved in writing by the 
Department of Industrial Engineering and are conditional upon subse- 
quent academic performance. In some cases, the program coordinator 
may permit substitution of relevant courses in place of the required 
courses. 

Seminar Project 

The program requires all students to complete IE 690 Seminar Proj- 
ect. This requirement is met by the preparation of a relevant seminar 
project report, prepared under the direction of a faculty advisor. The 
complete and final manuscript must be submitted to the project advisor 
prior to the end of the tenth week of the term in which the candidate 
expects to complete the requirements for the degree. For further speci- 
ficahons see Research Projects, Seminar Projects and Independent Study re- 
quirements detailed elsewhere in this catalog. It is suggested that a 
student begin work on the seminar project after having completed at 
least 15 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar to 
the required seminar project as a part of their professional duties may 
peHtion to sahsfy the seminar project requirement by taking two ad- 
vanced industrial engineering electives in place of the project. Such a 
substitution must have the prior written approval of the program 
coordinator. 

Required Courses 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 

IE 607 Probability Theory 3 

IE 624 Quahty Analysis 3 

IE 651 Human Engineering 1 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior, or 

V 620 Industrial Psychology 3 

Electives (IE or Math Courses) 9 

Electives 12 

Total credits 48 



Industrial/Organizational Psychology 57 

Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology 

Coordinator: Robert D. Dugan, Associate Professor of Psychology, 
Ph.D., Ohio State University 

The field of industrial and organizational psychology is directed 
toward the solution of a wide variety of human problems in 
organizational settings. This applied behavioral science and profession 
serves organizations and their employees in a number of areas. The list 
includes: 

• selection and placement of employees 

• human resource management 

• application of psychological tests and assessment techniques 

• employee performance review 

• employee training 

• management development 

• employee motivation and productivity 

• organizational climate 

• employee attitude and morale measurement 

• organizational change and development 

• human resource and personnel policy planning 

• job analysis and evaluation 

• job design and enrichment 

• employee counseling 

• stress management 

The goal of the graduate program is to develop expertise in applying 
the principles and practice of the science of psychology to improve the 
effectiveness and satisfaction of people at work. The program provides 
students with a knowledge of contemporary theory, research and 
practice in the areas listed above. Specific skills can be acquired through 
coordinating formal course work with an internship or practicum in an 
organizational setting. The practicum experience is for the student who 
is currently employed. The internship is served in one of several co- 
operating business, social service, health or government organizations. 
Both the internship and practicum receive graduate credit and are 
super\'ised by experienced full-time department faculty members. 

Admission Policy 

Applicants are expected to possess social and interpersonal charac- 
teristics that will support success in organizational settings. 

Students who give evidence of a mature interest in the application of 
psychological principles to organizahonal problems and who hold an 
undergraduate degree from an accredited college or university are 
eligible for admission. 

Applicants are required to complete a questionnaire and submit it 
directly to the Graduate School and may be required to submit scores 
from either the Miller Analogies Test or the Graduate Record Exami- 
nation Aptitude Test. 



An undergraduate major in psychology is not specifically required as 
a basis for consideration. However, all students are expected to have at 
least an introductory level understanding of psychological concepts, 
principles, and methods before taking courses in the master of arts in 
industrial/organizational psychology program. Mastery of the content 
of an introductory undergraduate statistics course is prerequisite to two 
of the six core courses. 

See page 75 for the senior professional certificate in applications of 
psychology. 



M.A., Industrial/ 

Organizational 

Psychology 



A total of 39 credit hours is required of candidates for the degree of 
master of arts in industrial/organizational psychology. Candidates for 
this degree are required to complete 18 credit hours of required courses 
in the core curriculum. Another 21 credit hours of electives are chosen 
after consultation with the program coordinator, or a representative, in 
light of the student's academic and professional goals. Students may 
not complete more than nine credit hours of electives until they have 
satisfied the core requirements. Up to nine credit hours of electives 
may be taken in other departments, such as industrial engineering, 
economics, management, markehng, public management. 

Transfer Credit 

The transfer of credit from other institutions will be permitted subject 
to the Graduate School policy on transfer of credit detailed elsewhere in 
this catalog. 

Thesis 

Students electing to write a thesis must register for P 698 Thesis 1, 
and P 699 Thesis II. The thesis must show ability to organize materials 
in a clear and original manner and present well-reasoned conclusions. 

The thesis is written under the direction of the faculty member in 
charge of the thesis seminar or a faculty member with special compe- 
tence in the subject matter of the thesis. The complete and final manu- 
script must be submitted to the thesis advisor prior to the end of the 
tenth week of the term in which the candidate expects to complete the 
requirements for the degree. Thesis preparation and submission must 
comply with the Graduate School policy on thesis/seminar project re- 
quirements detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

Program Options 

In response to the different needs and levels of preparation of 
students in the program, the four following options are available: 

Option 1 (Practicum) can be chosen by a student who is currently 
employed. This option allows the student to become involved in a 
project that is relevant to industrial/organizational psychology in his or 
her employing organization. The area of study will ordinarily be 
outside of the student's regular job assignment. It will be selected by 
the student's management in conjunction with the student and the 
faculty advisor. 

Option 2 (Internship) gives the student with limited work experience 
the opportunity to serve an internship in an organizational setHng. The 
content of the internship will be established jointly between the co- 
operating organization, the faculty advisor, and the student. 



Industrial/Organizational Psychology 59 




Option 3 (Thesis) will provide the student planning to pursue doctoral 
studies with an essenhal tool — the ability to do empirical research and 
report writing through the preparation of a thesis. 

Option 4 (Electives) consists of elective courses selected under faculty 
advisement. The choice of electives is intended to provide the student 
with a broad interdisciplinary background, complemenHng the stu- 
dent's own academic training and interest. 

Normally, the student should not begin work on any of the first three 
options until at least four core courses are completed. 

Required Courses 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

P 609 Research Methods* 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with 

Standardized Tests 3 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 3 

P 645 Seminar in Industrial/Organizational Psychology 3 

Elechve opHons (see below)** 21 

Total credits 39 

Elective Options 

Option 1 

P 678 Practicum I 3 

P 679 Practicum II 3 

Electives** 15 

Option 2 

P 693 Organizational Internship 1 3 

P 694 Organizational Internship II 3 

Electives** 15 

Option 3 

P 698 Thesis I 3 

P 699 Thesis II 3 

Electives** 15 

Option 4 

Electives** 21 



* Undergraduate preparation in statistics is prerequisite. 

** The choice of electives is made in consultation with a departmental advisor in 
light of the student's academic and professional goals. 



Industrial Relations 



Coordinator: Frank A. Scalia, Professor of Management Science, 
Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 

Environmental forces over the past two decades have created a 
demand for greater sophishcation and professionalism from those 
responsible for personnel functions within all organizations whether 
public or private, profit or non-profit, unionized or not. More and more 
companies and insHtutions are requiring the services of people con- 
versant with both the large body of available tools and the constraints 
that have evolved during this period. The program leading to the 
master of science degree in industrial relations represents a flexible 
response to this demand. 

Industrial relations, as a management and behavioral science dis- 
cipline, is concerned with all aspects of the employment relaHonship 
and, in parhcular, with the organization's maintenance of the human 
resources necessary to achieve organizational objectives. As an 
academic discipline and profession, industrial relations is an 
interdisciplinary, problem-solving field that attempts to maintain 
harmony and resolve conflicts among the four major parties to the 
employment relationship) — employees, employers, government and, 
where applicable, unions. 

The M.S. in industrial relations program is aimed at people presently 
employed in or aspiring to positions in various kinds of organizations 
in the fields of employment, training and development, wage and 
salary administration, employee services and benefits, labor/manage- 
ment relations, job and organizational design, labor economics and 
manpower planning. 

Because of the diversity of student interests and employment 
demand, the program is flexible. The required courses in the program 
are drawn from the disciplines of economics, management and 
psychology. There is a great deal of flexibility in elective courses 
including options in management, psychology, public administration, 
markehng, economics, accounting, quantitative analysis, industrial 
engineering and others. As a result the student will find it possible, to a 
large extent, to tailor the curriculum to his or her specific needs and 
interests. 

Admission Policy 

Admission is open to individuals holding a baccalaureate degree 
from an accredited institution of higher education. While not an 
absolute necessity, the undergraduate degree should preferably be in 
business administration, public administration or in a social or 
behavioral science (e.g., economics, history, political science, 
psychology, or sociology). Admission is also open to full-time 
employed professionals in personnel and industrial relations holding a 
baccalaureate degree in any field from an accredited institution. 

Though admissions decisions are usually based on an applicant's 
undergraduate record, in exceptional cases the applicant may be 
required to submit scores from the Graduate Management Admissions 
Test (GMAT). A personal interview with the industrial relations 
program coordinator may also be required. 



Industrial Relations 61 



M.S., Industrial 
Relations 



A minimum total of 39 graduate credit hours is required for the 
master of science degree in industrial relahons. Of these, fifteen hours 
are in approved elective courses. A student may opt to complete a 
thesis in lieu of two elechve courses. 

While a sample of available elective courses is presented below, the 
complete and much lengthier list of pre-approved electives is available 
from the industrial relations program coordinator. It may also be 
possible to take, for elective credit, courses not presently on this list. In 
this case, however, approval of the coordinator is required. 

Required Courses 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 3 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 3 

MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 3 

MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

Electives (Approved) 15 

Total credits 39 



Electives 

(Sample list. Complete list available from the industrial relations 
coordinator.) 



A 609 State and Local Taxation 

CO 621 The Communication Process 

EC 629 Public Policies Toward Business 

HM 630 Personnel and Labor Relations in Hotel and Restaurant 

Operations 

IE 604 Management Systems 

MG 640 Management of Health Care Organizations 

MG 661 Development of Management Thought 

MG 662 Organization Theory 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 

P 628 The Interview 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with Standardized Tests 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and Morale 

P 641 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining in 

the Public Sector 

PA 650 Administrative Law 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 

SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 

SO 601 Minority Group Relations 



Legal Studies 




Coordinator: Joshua H. Sandman, Associate Professor of Political 
Science, Ph.D., New York University 

In view of the increasing importance and complexity of law in society 
and its relevance to non-lawyers, the program is designed to provide 
expanded knowledge and understanding of the origins and applica- 
tions of law in the modern world. 

The program will explore the theoretical foundations of law and the 
structural foundations of American and international law, as well as 
more specific and technical application affecting modern institutions, 
corporations, and individuals. In addition, electives will permit concen- 
trations in two major areas of law — Law and the Public Sector and Law 
and the Industrial Process. 

The interdisciplinary program will examine the creation and 
functioning of law at the global, national and state levels among 
administrative bodies, regulatory agencies, legislatures, and the courts. 
Among the issue-areas covered are legislative law-making, lobbying, 
contracts, torts, occupational health and safety, collective bargaining, 
taxation, equal employment opportunity, and affirmative action. 



M.A., Legal Studies 



All students in the master of arts in legal studies program must earn a 
minimum of 42 credit hours, including 24 credits or required core 
courses. They should select 18 credits in a concentration, either Law 
and the Public Sector or Law and the Industrial Sector as outlined 
below. 

Each student is expected to write a thesis or take a comprehensive 
examination in the last year of graduate study. Additional concen- 
trations may be available at a later date. Students wishing to coordinate 
new concentrations with existing concentrations may do so upon the 
approval and advice of the coordinator. 

Required Courses 

PS 601 Constitutional Law 3 

PS 602 Civil Liberties and Rights 3 

PS 603 International Law 3 

PS 610 Legal Methods 1 3 

PS 615 Jurisprudence 3 

PS 625 Transnational Legal Structure 3 

PS 655 Conflict Resolution 3 

LA 673 Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 3 

Concentration 18 

Total credits 42 



Legal Studies Concentrations 63 



Concentrations 



Concentration I: 
Law and the Public 
Sector 



Concentration II: 
Law and the 
Industrial Sector 



PS 608 The Legislative Process 3 

Plus five courses from the following: 

PS 604 Human Rights and the Law 3 

PS 605 Criminal Law 3 

PS 613 Political Justice 3 

PS 616 Urban Government 3 

PS 628 Change and Government 3 

PS 633 The Political Process and the Aged 3 

PS 635 Law and Public Health 3 

PS 652 Legal Administration 3 

PS 670 Special Topics 3 

PS 698-99 Thesis I and II 6 

CE 606 Environmental Law and Legislation 3 

HU 631 Culture and Ethics in the Modern Age 3 

PA 650 Administrative Law 3 

SO 649 Seminar in Health and Social Policy 3 

Total credits 18 

PS 626 Decision Making in the Political Process 3 

Plus five courses from the following: 

PS 612 Contracts, Torts and the Practice of Law 3 

PS 617 Law, Science and Ethics 3 

PS 645 Government and the Industrial Sector 3 

PS 670 Special Topics 3 

PS 698-99 Thesis I and II 3 

PA 650 Administrative Law 3 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation 1 3 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 3 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 3 

A 614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 3 

EC 629 Public Policies Toward Business 3 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 3 

HU 641 Technology and Human Values 3 

LA 674 Business Law II: Business Organizations and 

Negotiable Instruments 3 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 3 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 2 

SH 630 Product Safety and Liability 3 

Total credits 18 



Mechanical Engineering 



Acting Coordinator: John Sarris, Associate Professor of Mechanical 
Engineering, Ph.D., Tufts University 

This program is intended to meet the needs of professionally em- 
ployed engineers and scientists for academic work beyond the bacca- 
laureate level. It has been designed to increase competence in modem 
analysis and synthesis techniques as they apply to engineering design. 

The program centers on a core sequence which all students are 
expected to take. The core courses contain advanced methods of 
analysis and design which are of common interest in engineering work. 
Students complete the program by electing a series of courses in 
mechanical engineering that is particularly suited to their current 
professional interests. Early in the program, students, with the ap- 
proval of their advisors, prepare a detailed plan insuring an overall 
educational experience that is integrated and logical. 

All decisions regarding both core and elective requirements are 
subject to final approval of the student's advisor. 



M.S., Mechanical 
Engineering 



A minimum of 39 credits must be completed to earn the master of 
science degree in mechanical engineering. Transfer of credit from other 
institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit. A thesis is optional but highly recommended for 
students wishing to study in depth particular areas of interest under 
the guidance of a faculty member. Thesis topics should be approved by 
the faculty advisor when the student has completed 18-21 graduate 
credits.* Thesis preparation and submission must comply with 
Graduate School policy on theses. The final manuscript must be 
submitted to the advisor prior to the end of the tenth week of the term 
in which the candidate expects to complete the requirements for the 
degree. Students who elect not to write a thesis must take two 
additional M.E. elective courses and a comprehensive examination 
based on the required core of courses. 

Required Courses 

M 624 Applied Mathematics 3 

ME 602 Mechanical Engineering Analysis I 3 

ME 604 Mechanical Engineering Analysis II 3 

ME 605 Finite Element Methods in Engineering 3 

ME 615 Theory of Elasticity 3 

ME 625 Mechanics of Continua 3 

ME 630 Advanced Fluid Mechanics 3 

ME 698-699 Thesis I and II or two additional M.E. and 

comprehensive examination 6 

Electives 12 

Total credits 39 



O.S.H. Management 65 

Elective Courses 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 3 

ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 3 

ME 611 System Vibrations 3 

ME 620 Classical Thermodynamics 3 

ME 622 Statistical Mechanics 3 

ME 628 Modem Materials 3 

ME 632 Advanced Heat Transfer 3 

ME 645 Computational Fluid E>ynamics and Heat Transfer 3 

ME 670 Special Topics — Mechanical Engineering 3 

ME 695 Independent Study I 3 

ME 696 Independent Study II 3 

*Contact the coordinator for the name of the advisor for these special- 
ized areas: acoushcs/aerodynamics, fluids/biomechanics/design, gas 
dynamics, heat transfer/thermodynamics, mechanics/materials, solids/ 
numerical techniques, vibrations/systems analysis. 



Occupational Safety and 
Health Management 



Coordinator: Douglas C. Gray, Associate Professor of Occupational 
Safety and Health Management, Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 

The master of science degree program in occupational safety and 
health management is designed to provide the core technical knowl- 
edge and the managerial skills to administrate a safety and health pro- 
gram, particularly at the corporate level. 

The program is designed to accommodate both the active practiHoner 
in the OSH field and the novice who aspires to a career in this dynamic 
occupation. This flexibility is provided through a program sequence of 
30 credit hours of core courses and 18 credit hours of elective courses 
offered in both science/engineering and management areas. 

Admissions Policy 

Admission to the master of science in occupational safety and health 
management program is open to persons who hold a baccalaureate 
degree from an accredited institution. An undergraduate grade point 
average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale is required for provisional accept- 
ance, 3.0 for full matriculation. Undergraduate courses in general 
chemistry, general physics, biology, statistics, psychology, and 
accounting are required. The degree candidate may be required to 
submit scores from the Graduate Record Examination. Students who 
do not meet all requirements will be evaluated on an individual basis. 



M.S., Occupational 
Safety and Health 
Management 




Candidates are required to complete 48 credit hours of graduate 
work. Transfer of credit from other institutions will be permitted sub- 
ject to the Graduate School policy on transfer credit noted elsewhere 
in this catalog. Consideration for waiver of core courses on the basis 
of undergraduate experience is at the discretion of the program 
coordinator. 

The student has the option of selecting twelve credit hours in 
electives with the approval of the faculty advisor in order to graduate, 
students also must elect either six hours from SH 693/694 Internship, 
SH 695/696 Independent Study, or SH 698/699 Thesis in accordance 
with the Graduate School requirements on thesis detailed elsewhere in 
this catalog. 

Required Courses 

SH 602 Safety Organization and Administration 3 

SH 605 Industrial Safety Engineering 3 

SH 608 Industrial Hygiene Practices 3 

SH 611 OSH Seminar 1 

SH 615 Industrial Toxicology 3 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and Health Law 2 

SH 630 Product Safety and LiabUity 3 

IE 651 Human Engineering 1 3 

MG 637 Management 3 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

ElecHves 18 

Total credits 48 

Elective Courses 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 3 

CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 3 

IE 612 Managerial Interactions 1 3 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 3 

MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 3 

P 640 Industrial Motivahon and Morale 3 

SC 603 Air Pollution 3 

SC 610 General Environmental Health 3 

SH 660 Industrial VentilaHon 3 

SH 670 Selected Topics 3 

SH 690-691 Research Project I and II 1-3 each 

SH 693-694 OSH Internship I and II 1-3 each 

SH 695-696 Independent Study I and II 1-3 each 

SH 698-699 Thesis I and II 6 



Operations Research 67 



Operations Research 



Coordinator: Ira H. Kleinfeld, Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering, Eng. Sc.D, Columbia University 

The master of science in operations research curriculum provides 
thorough coverage of the theory, methodology and applicahon of the 
techniques of operations research and systems analysis. The program is 
designed to prepare qualified applicants from diverse backgrounds to 
deal with major social, industrial and business problems. 



M.S., Operations 
Research 



The basic program consists of 48 credit hours. The transfer of credit 
from other institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this catalog. Required 
courses may be waived on the basis of undergraduate courses taken 
at accredited institutions. All waivers must be approved in writing by 
the Department of Industrial Engineering and are contingent upon 
subsequent academic performance. In some cases, the coordinator may 
permit substitution of relevant courses in place of the required courses. 

Seminar Project 

The master of science in operations research program requires all 
students to complete IE 690 Seminar Project. This requirement is met 
by the preparation of a relevant seminar project report, prepared under 
the direction of a faculty advisor. The complete and final manuscript 
must be submitted to the project advisor prior to the end of the tenth 
week of the term in which the candidate expects to complete the 
requirements for his degree. For further specification see Research 
Projects, Seminar Projects and Independent Study requirements detailed 
elsewhere in this catalog. It is suggested that a student begin work on 
the seminar project after having completed at least 15 credit hours. 

In certain cases, students who routinely complete projects similar to 
the required seminar project as a part of their professional duties may 
petition to satisfy the seminar project requirement by taking two ad- 
vanced industrial engineering electtves in place of the project. Such a 
substitution must have the prior written approval of the program 
coordinator. 

Required Courses 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations Research/ 

Management Science 3 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital Computers (FORTRAN) 3 

IE 607 ProbabUity Theory 3 

IE 621 Linear Programming 3 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 3 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 3 

IE 686 Inventory Analysis 3 

IE 688 Design of Experiments 3 

IE 690 Seminar Project 3 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus and Linear Algebra 3 

Electives (IE, Math, or EE) 6 

Electives 9 

Total credits 48 



Public Administration 



Coordinator: Lynn H. Monahan, Associate Professor of Criminal 
Justice, Ph.D., University of Oregon 

The general purpose of the master of public administration degree at 
the University of New Haven is the training of men and women at the 
graduate level for public service careers. Specifically, the program 
strives to: 

• equip students with modern analytical and quantitattve tools of 
decision making and their application to complex problems of 
government and non-profit organizations; 

• expose students to the wide range of administrative and managerial 
problems and responsibilities in the public sector; and 

• increase the student's knowledge and skills in the particular 
management functions of budgeting, planning, public policy 
formulation, public finance, public personnel administration, 
collective bargaining and research. 

•»|- p * Forty-two graduate credit hours are required of candidates for this 

IVl.l ./\. degree. Of the 15 credit hours of electives in the M.P.A. program, sb< 

credit hours may be taken in graduate courses offered in other pro- 
grams such as psychology, criminal justice, economics, and industrial 
engineering. 

See page 79 for the senior professional cerhficate in public 
management. 

Required Courses 

PA 601 Principles of Public Administration 3 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation and Implementation 3 

PA 604 Communities and Social Change 3 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining 

in the Public Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

PA 690 Research Seminar 3 

EC 608 Economics for Public Administrators 3 

Electives 15 

Total credits 42 



Concentration 

The concentration in the master of public administration program is 
designed to provide career-oriented structure for students with well- 
formed career interests. The concentration in health care management 
is the first concentration introduced into the program. The department 
expects to develop additional concentrations over the next several 
years. 



Taxation 69 



Concentration in 
Health Care 
Management 



Advisor: Lynn H. Monahan, Associate Professor of Criminal 
Justice, Ph.D., University of Oregon 

The concentration in health care management is designed for those 
individuals currently in health care management or those who 
anticipate a career in health care management. Courses are designed to 
prepare students with the conceptual and practical skills necessary for 
the management of a health care organizaHon. 

Students following the health care concentration will take the core 
curriculum of 10 courses and follow the health care concentration of 
five courses for their five elective courses. 

MG 640 Management of Health Care Organizahons 3 

PA 641 Financial Management of Health Care Organizations .... 3 

PA 643 Health and Institutional Planning 3 

PS 635 Law and Public Health 3 

Plus one course chosen from among the foUoiving: 

PA 642 Health Care Delivery Systems 3 

PA 644 Administratton of Programs and Services for the Aged. . . 3 

PA 645 Health Care Economics and Finance 3 

PA 670 Selected Topics 3 

Total credits 15 




Taxation 



Coordinator: Robert E. VVnek, Assistant Professor of Accounring and 
Finance, CPA, J.D., Delaware Law School of Widener College 

The decision by government to utilize its taxing authority to pursue a 
variety of economic and social goals has led to the development of a 
complex body of "tax law." Given the dynamic state of society's 
economic and social goals, the body of "tax law" characterishcally 
exists in a continual state of change. 

The complexity of "tax law" is significant not only because of its 
impact upon accomplishing society's goals but also because of its influ- 
ence upon the economic decison-making process. Tax consequences 
have been and will continue to be an important financial consideration. 

Program Objectives 

In recognition of the above, a need to prepare technically competent 
individuals for careers in the field of taxation has developed. Owing to 
the complex and dynamic nature of "tax law," it appears appropriate to 
conduct this preparation at an advanced level of inquiry with an 
emphasis upon examining the issues of current interest in taxation. 
Accordingly, the master of science program in taxation has been 
designed as a framework to accomplish the following structure of 
objectives: 



• to prepare students for technical competence in understanding and 
interpreting tax law; 

• to familiarize students with the administrative structure and 
procedures of the Internal Revenue Service; 

• to inform students about approaches to independent research in the 
field of tax law; 

• to offer an understanding of the role tax law plays in social and 
economic policy. 

Given the above objectives, the master of science program in taxation 
provides a framework through which advanced and timely tax training 
can be acquired by experienced professionals (accountants and attor- 
neys) practicing in the field of taxation, as well as individuals seeking to 
prepare themselves for entry into career positions in taxarton. 

Admission Policy 

Admission to matriculation in the program is available to CPA's, 
attorneys, and persons holding an undergraduate degree from an 
accredited institution, preferably, but not exclusively, in accounting or 
in business administration with a major in accounhng. Persons holding 
other than the above degrees will be required to take a number of 
selected undergraduate courses as a condition for admission. 
Admission is based primarily on an applicant's undergraduate record; 
however, the promise of academic success is the essential factor for 
admission. In support of their application, persons may submit their 
scores from the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). An 
applicant may be required to take this test. 

l^/f c "TaYatinn A minimum total of 36 credits is required for the master of science in 

*' taxation. The 36 credits will include 24 credits from required core 

courses and 12 credits from electives. The transfer of credit from other 
institutions will be permitted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

See page 80 for the senior professional certificate in taxation. 

Required Courses 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation 1 3 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 3 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 3 

A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 3 

A 607 Tax Accounting 3 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 3 

A 614 Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 3 

A 615 Research Project in Federal Income Taxation 3 

Electives 12 

Total credits 36 

Elective Courses 

A 603 Federal Income Taxation III 3 

A 606 Corporate Income Taxation III 3 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 3 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 3 

A 611 Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 3 

A 612 International Taxation 3 

A 613 Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 3 



Sr. Professional Certificates 71 

For practitioners wishing to improve or update their tax skills but 
uncertain about pursuing a master's in taxation, two senior profes- 
sional certificate programs are offered: Taxation of Individuals (OpHon 
I) and Taxation of Corporafions (Option II), as described on page 80. 

Practicing CPA's in need of confinuing education credits and others 
generally seeking to expand their tax background should consider this 
alternative. 



Senior Professional 
Certificates 




This program is limited to those already holding an advanced degree 
who want addifional graduate study in a coherent program, but do not 
want to work toward another advanced degree. 

Since the senior professional cerfificate is not a degree, a student may 
transfer credits earned for a certificate into a master's program at any 
fime, subject to the requirements of the master's degree and the 
decision of the coordinator of the master's program, and to acceptance 
in the master's program. Professional certificates, for those without 
advanced degrees, are available in criminal justice and forensic science. 

Students complefing work in a cerfificate program do not attend 
commencement but will receive a cerfificate. A pefifion for cerfificafion 
must be filed with the graduate registrar and the appropriate fee paid. 
When the course work is reviewed and found complete, the cerfificate 
will be mailed to the student. 

Senior Professional Certificate Requirements 

The program consists of 15 or 18 credits, depending upon the area 
chosen. Students, having chosen their area of study, should contact the 
advisor who is listed for that parficular area. Students must meet all 
course prerequisite requirements. 

Programs of Study 

Sixteen senior professional cerfificates are offered. Four programs 
allow opfions to choose a parficular specialty. The programs are the 
following: 
Accounfing 

I: Financial Accounfing 

II: Managerial Accounfing 

III: Accounfing Informafion Systems 
Applications of Psychology 

Computer Applications and Information Systems 
Dietetics Administration 
Economic Forecasting 
Finance 

General Management 
Gerontology 

Hotel and Restaurant Administration 
Human Resources Management 
International Business 



Marketing 

I: Marketing 

II: Quantitative Techniques in Marketing 
Media in Business 
Public Management 

I: Survey of the Field 

II: Urban and Regional Planning and Management 

III: Public Personnel Management 
Quantitative Analysis 
Taxation 

I: Taxation of Individuals 

II: Taxation of Corporations 



Accounting 



Advisor: Robert E. Wnek, Assistant Professor of Accounting and 
Finance, CPA 




The certificates in accounting are recommended to students and . 
professionals whose educahon already includes an accounting degree 
and who desire to pursue accounting at an advanced level without 
necessarily enrolling in the full graduate program. It is especially 
recommended to certified public accountants who desire to obtain 
continuing professional educahon credits in an academic environment. 

Option I: Financial Accounting* 

Any five from the following: 

A 650 Advanced Accounting Theory 3 

A 651 Financial Accounting Seminar 3 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 3 

A 653 Accounting for Not-for-Profit Organization 3 

A 654 Financial Statements: Reporting and Analysis 3 

A 656 International Accounting 3 

Total credits 15 

Option II: Managerial Accounting* 

Any five from the following: 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 3 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 3 

A 642 Operational Auditing 3 

A 661 Managerial Accounting Seminar 3 

PI 615 Finance 3 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 3 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and Capital Market Analysis 3 

Total credits 15 



Option III: Accounting Information Systems* 

A 641 Accounting Information Systems 3 

A 642 Operational Auditing 3 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 3 

Plus any two accounting systems or computer science courses 6 

Total credits 15 



' Other courses may be substituted by consent of the coordinator of the program. 



Applications of Psychology Certificate 73 



Applications of 
Psychology 



Advisor: Thomas L. Mentzer, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology 

The senior professional certificate in applicahons of psychology is 
designed to assist professionals who wish to acquire specific kinds of 
skills in areas dealing with human services or personnel functions. This 
program can be tailored to the needs of either one whose master's 
degree is in a non-psychological field or one with a master's degree in 
psychology who wishes to broaden skills to a new area of psychology. 
Courses will be selected depending upon the student's career 
objectives and academic preparation. These courses may be from the 
following list, but other courses, independent study, or special topics 
courses may be chosen where appropriate. 

Any five of the following: 

P 610 Program Evaluation 3 

P 621 Behavior Modification 3 

P 623 Psychology of the Small Group 3 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 3 

P 628 The Interview 3 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 3 

P 630 Psychology of Personality 3 

P 631 Social Psychology 3 

P 632 Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 3 

P 633 Problems of Drug Abuse 3 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 3 

P 638 Psychology of Communicahon and Opinion Change 3 

P 641 Personnel Development and Training 3 

P 642 Organizational Change and Development 3 

P 650 Ecological Psychology 3 

Total credits 15 



Computer 
Applications and 
Information Systems 



Advisor: Roger G. Frey, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Industrial 
Engineering 

This certificate covers programming and systems with a business 
systems emphasis, preparing the student to carry out systems studies, 
and to interact knowledgeably with programmers and computer 
systems speciahsts. 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

IE 605 Advanced Business Programming 3 

IE 610 Computer Systems Selection 3 

IE 614 Data Information Systems 3 

IE 684 Multiprogramming Systems 3 

Total credits 15 



Dietetics 
Administration 



Advisor: Ronald A. Usiewicz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Hotel/Restaurant Management; Dietetics and Tourism 
Administration 



This certificate is designed for those students who wish to become 
effective professional managers in health care. It is designed to expand 
the student's awareness of organizational structures and to under- 
score the importance of those financial, economic, marketing and 
statistical factors which contribute to the success of a health care 
organization. 

HM 610 Content Seminar in Dietehcs 3 

HM 635 Applied Dietetics for Health Care Professionals 3 

HM 670 Special Topics in Dietetics 3 

HM 690 Research in Dietehcs 3 

SC 615 Life Cycle Nutrition 3 

SC 616 Geriatric and Advanced Nutrition 3 

Total credits 18 



Economic 
Forecasting 



Advisor: Joseph A. Parker, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Students enrolled in this program are expected to have knowledge of 
computer use, especially FORTRAN. The certificate is designed to 
provide preparation for careers in forecasting and modeling. 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 3 

EC 645 Seminar in Macroeconomic Policy 3 

EC 653 Econometrics 3 

QA 607 Forecasting 3 

Plus one of the following: 

EC 629 Pubhc Policies Toward Business 3 

EC 630 Structure of American Industry 3 

EC 633 Managerial Economics 3 

Total credits 15 



Finance* 



Advisor: Robert Rainish, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Accounting 
and Finance 



The goal of the finance certificate is to prepare individuals for the 
expanding sector of financial services and modem corporate financial 
management. The program stresses the understanding of the con- 
ceptual foundations of finance and uses of analytical techniques, with 
special emphasis on the implications and applicatons of the financial 
concepts. Senior certificate candidates are required to meet the 
prerequisites for FI 615. It is strongly recommended that the individual 
contacts as early as possible the finance coordinator to program the 
appropriate sequence of courses. 



General Management Certificate 75 

FI 615 Finance 3 

Choose any four from the followmg: 

FI 617 Financial Institutions and Capital Markets 3 

FI 619 Monetary and Central Banking Policy 3 

FI 620 Working Capital Management and Planning 3 

FI 645 Corporate Financial Theory 3 

FI 649 Security Analysis 3 

FI 651 Portfolio Theory and Capital Market Analysis 3 

FI 655 Commodity Market Analysis 3 

Total credits 15 

* Other courses may be substituted by consent of the coordinator of the program. 



General 
Management 



Advisor: Shiv L. Sawhney, Ph.D., Professor of Management Science 

The certificate in general management is designed to develop 
students' conceptual knowledge and skills in formulating corporate 
strategy to pursue the business organization's purpose or purposes, 
and determining structural and resource requirements. The program 
focuses on concepts and processes useful in relation to general 
management, and functional responsibilities in coordinating and 
directing the organizational effort in our ever-changing economic 
environment. Please note that MK 609 and MG 637 are prerequisites for 
the certificate. 



MG 661 Development of Management Thought 3 

MG 664 Organizational Effectiveness 3 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 3 

and three of the following: 

MG 660 Comparative Management 3 

MG 662 OrganizaHon Theory 3 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 3 

MG 675 Readings in Management 3 

MG 680 Current Topics in Business Administration 3 

Total credits 18 



Gerontology 



Advisor: Judith B. Gordon, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Sociology 

The senior professional certificate in gerontology is designed to 
enhance existing skills of professionals working with the elderly in 
social work, law, medicine, nursing, and other related fields. 

Students are expected to plan a sequence of courses with the faculty 
advisor at the start of the program. Elective courses will be selected 
depending upon a student's interests, career objectives and academic 
preparation. 



P 672 Psychology of the Middle and Later Years 3 

SO 651 Social Gerontology 3 

SO 695 Independent Study I 3 

SW 652 Human Services and the Elderly II: 

Programs, Planning, Policies 3 

Plus two electives, by advisement 6 

Total credits 18 



Hotel and 

Restaurant 

Management 



Advisor: Ronald A. Usiewicz, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Hotel/Restaurant Management; Dietetics and Tourism 
Administration 

This certificate is designed to develop analytical skills necessary for 
the competent and profitable operahon of a hospitality facility and to 
expand the student's awareness in and to underscore the importance of 
those financial, economic, marketing and statistical factors which 
contribute to the success of a hospitality operation. 

HM 610 Content Seminar in Hotel and Restaurant Management . . 3 
HM 625 Supervisory and Leadership Development in 

Hotel and Restaurant Operations 3 

HM 630 Personnel and Labor Relations in Hotel and 

Restaurant Operations 3 

HM 655 Development of Hotel/Restaurant/InsHtuHonal 

Operations 3 

HM 670 Special Topics in Hotel and Restaurant Management .... 3 

HM 690 Research in Hotel and Restaurant Management 3 

Total credits 18 



Human Resources 
Management 



Advisor: Frank A. Scalia, Ph.D., Professor of Management Science 

This certificate is designed for the personnel professional or the 
individual presently in a different field who aspires to the personnel 
function. For the individual whose previous degrees are not related to 
human resource management or who is looking for an update without 
necessarily pursuing a specialized degree, this program will be worthy 
of consideration. 



International Business Certificate 77 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 3 

MG 678 Personnel Management Seminar 3 

and four of the following: 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

EC 627 Economics of Labor Relations 3 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 3 

MG 663 Leadership in Organizations 3 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 3 

MG 679 Industrial Relations Seminar 3 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 3 

P 628 The Interview 3 

P 641 Personnel Development & Training 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining in 

the Public Sector 3 

Total credits 18 

Note: Course substitutions may be permitted depending upon the background 
of the student and subject to the approval of the advisor. 



International 
Business 



Advisor: Thomas Katsaros, Ph.D., Professor of Marketing 

This certificate is designed to prepare future managers to deal with 
the current problems and methods of analysis related to international 
business. This includes basic techniques and skills, such as adapting 
to new political and cultural environments, which are not normally 
covered by traditional courses. 

IB 643 International Business 3 

IB 644 International Trade and Finance 3 

Plus any three from the following: 

IB 645 Comparative International Business Environments 3 

IB 651 International Marketing 3 

IB 652 Multinational Business Management 3 

MG 660 ComparaHve Management 3 

EC 641 Intemahonal Economics 3 

Total credits 15 



Marketing 



Advisor: Shiv L. Sawhney, Ph.D., Professor of Management Science 

The certificate in marketing allows the student to develop a deeper 
understanding of marketing phenomena and analytical skills. Specific 
emphasis is given to the development of content knowledge and skills 
necessary for operating managers of the marketing function. It is 
suggested that the elechve courses be taken first, followed by Market- 
ing Research and, finally. Marketing Management. Please note that 
MK 609 and MG 637 are prerequisites for the certificate. 



78 




Option I: Marketing 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 3 

MK 641 Marketing Management 3 

Plus one course in International Business 
and two courses from the following: 

MK 616 Buyer Behavior 3 

MK 643 Product Management 3 

MK 644 Consumerism 3 

MK 645 Distribution Strategy 3 

MK 680 Marketing Workshop 3 

MG 669 Business Policy and Strategy 3 

Total credits 15 

This specialization will enable you to utilize the latest quantitative 
methods to redefine and to plan the corporate scope of a business. It is 
critical for problem-solving at both strategic and tactical levels. Par- 
ticular emphasis is placed on marketing distribution problems by the 
intensive study of transportation and logistics. 

Option II: Quantitative Techniques in Marketing 

IE 603F Inti-oduction to Digital Computers: FORTRAN 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

Plus any three from the following: 

IE 615 Transportation and Distribution 3 

MK 639 Marketing Research and Information Systems 3 

MK 641 Marketing Management 3 

QA 607 Forecasting 3 

Total credits 15 



Media in 
Business 



Advisor: Steven Raucher, Ph.D., Associate Professor of 
Communication 

The proper use of media is one of the roads to success for any 
business, large or small. Professionals with media skills can be found in 
advertising, marketing, personnel and management positions in just 
about all kinds of business entities. This program gives the student 
those skills, theories and techniques, desirable and necessary within 
the corporate environment. Stressing media in terms of audio-visual 
use, media presentation, and training, professionalism becomes the 
focus of the program. The student will be introduced to different media 
and all stages of production, from script to transparency to video. As a 
final course project, the student will link up with a corporate sponsor to 
design and produce a specific media presentation. 

CO 601 Basics of Business Media Production Techniques 3 

CO 605 Planning Audio Visual Systems for Business 3 

CO 609 Scripting the Media Presentation 3 

CO 613 Media Presentations for Business 3 

CO 621 The Communication Process 3 

Total credits 15 



Note: CO 601 is a prerequisite to CO 613. 



Public Management Certificate 79 

Public IVIanSSement Advisor: Lynn H. Monahan, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Criminal 

O Justice 

The certificates in public management are designed to provide a 
broad overview of the most up-to-date thinking in public management 
today. Courses emphasize conceptual and analytic skill building. Stu- 
dents may opt for either a survey of the field, urban and regional 
planning and management, or public personnel management. 

Option I: Survey of the Field 

Choose any five from the following: 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 3 

PS 608 The Legislative Process 3 

PA 611 Research Methods in Public Administration 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining 

in the Pubhc Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

PA 630 Governmental Accounting 3 

PA 632 Public Finance and Budgeting 3 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 3 

Total credits 15 

Option II: Urban and Regional Planning and 
Management 

Choose any five from the following: 

EC 665 Urban and Regional Economic Development 3 

PA 630 Governmental Accounting 3 

PA 634 Problems of Municipal Management 3 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory and Practice 3 

PA 661 Problems of Metropolitan Areas 3 

PS 616 Urban Government 3 

Total credits 15 

Option III: Public Personnel Management 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 3 

MG 645 Management of Human Resources 3 

PA 620 Personnel Administration and Collective Bargaining 

in the Public Sector 3 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 3 

and one from the following: 

MG 665 Compensation Administration 3 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion Measurement 3 

P 635 Assessment of Human Performance with 

Standardized Tests 3 

Total credits 15 



80 



Quantitative 
Analysis 



Advisor: Joseph A. Parker, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

IE 604 Management Systems 3 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 3 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 3 

QA 606 Advanced Management Science 3 

QA 607 Forecasting 3 

Total credits 15 



Taxation 



Advisor: Robert E. Wnek, Assistant Professor of Accounting and 
Finance, CPA 



For practitioners who wish to improve or up-date their tax skills, but 
do not wish to pursue a master's in taxation now, two senior profes- 
sional certificates programs are offered: Taxation of Individuals 
(Option I) and Taxation of Corporations (Option 11), both described 
below. 

Practicing C.P.A.'s needing continuing education credits and others 
seeking to expand their tax background should consider these 
alternatives. 

Option I: Taxation of Individuals* 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation 1 3 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 3 

A 603 Federal Income Taxation in 3 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 3 

Plus one taxation elective 3 

Total credits 15 

Option II: Taxation of Corporations* 

A 604 Corporate Income Taxation I 3 

A 605 Corporate Income Taxation II 3 

A 606 Corporate Income Taxation III 3 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 3 

Plus one taxation elective 3 

Total credits 15 



*Other courses may be substituted by consent of the coordinator of the program. 






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COURSES 



Unless otherwise indicated, all 
graduate courses carry three credit 
hours. 



Accounting 

A 600 Accounting 

The principles and procedures 
underlying the generation of fi- 
nancial accounting information. 
No credit. 

A 601 Federal Income Taxation I 

A study of tax policy and the ba- 
sic principles of the federal income 
tax law taught at an advanced level 
of inquiry. Coverage entails the 
key concepts of gross income, ad- 
justed gross income, deductions, 
exempHons, credits, and special 
tax computations, with special at- 
tention given to the provisions of 
the Internal Revenue Code affect- 
ing individual taxpayers. 

A 602 Federal Income Taxation II 

Prerequisite: A 601. A continua- 
tion of Federal Income Taxation 1 
emphasizing the basic provisions 
concerning dispositions of prop- 
erty: analysis of basis, recognihon 
of gain or loss, capital asset trans- 
actions and non-recognition ex- 
changes. Coverage extended to 
deferred payment sales and depre- 
ciation recapture. 



A 603 Federal Income Taxation III 

Prerequisite: A 602. An exami- 
nahon of the fundamentals of the 
federal taxation of deferred com- 
pensation. The course will focus on 
qualified and nonqualified retire- 
ment plans, individual and self- 
employed retirement plans and tax 
deferred annuiries as developed 
by the Employment Retirement 
Income Security Act of l'^74, and 
subsequent legislation. Deferred 
executive compensation arrange- 
ments, stock opHons, restricted 
property and various employee 
benefit plans will also be analyzed . 

A 604 Corporate Income 
Taxation I 

Prerequisite: A 602. A founda- 
tion course analyzing the basic 
federal income tax provisions af- 
fecting corporations and share- 
holders. Course coverage includes 
organization of the corporation, 
corporate capital structure, corpo- 
rate distributions, stock redemp- 
tions, bail-out techniques and liq- 
uidations. 

A 605 Corporate Income 
Taxation II 

Prerequisite: A 604. Advanced 
study in the corporate tax area 
including subchapter S corpora- 
tions, collapsible corporations, ac- 
cumulated earnings tax, affiliated 
corporations and carryover of cor- 
porate tax attributes. 

A 606 Corporate Income 
Taxation III 

Prerequisite: A 604. A detailed 
analysis of the federal income tax 
rules covering corporate reorgani- 
zations and divisions. Also dis- 
cussed are some of the nontax as- 
pects of corporate reorganizations 
such as S.E.C., anti-trust, and 
business reasons for choice of par- 
ticular method. 



A 607 Tax Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 601. Investiga- 
tion of such areas as: problems of 
allocating income and deductions 
to the proper tax year, permissible 
tax accounhng methods, deprecia- 
tion, inventory methods, individ- 
ual net operating losses, change in 
accounting method and compari- 
son of business and tax accounhng 
principles. 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 

A comprehensive introduction 
to, and analysis of, the federal es- 
tate and gift tax laws including ba- 
sic principles of estate planning. 
Procedures for preparation of the 
estate and gift tax returns are 
treated. Coverage is also given to 
state death and inheritance taxes. 

A 609 State and Local Taxation 

The tax problems encountered 
at the state and local level by busi- 
nesses engaged in interstate com- 
merce. Federal limitations on the 
taxahon of multistate enterprises 
and jurisdictional problems are ex- 
amined. Specific areas covered 
are: license to do business, net in- 
come, franchise, gross receipts, 
property, and sales and use taxes. 
Apportionment problems are ex- 
amined in detaU. 

A 610 Consolidated Returns 

Prerequisite: A 604. A thorough 
analysis of the federal consoli- 
dated tax return provisions includ- 
ing eligibility and whether to file 
a consolidated return; intercom- 
pany transactions and deferral 
concepts; basis in the disposition 
of stock of a subsidiary; computa- 
tion of earnings and profits; and 
mechanics of preparing the con- 
solidated return. 



A 611 Income Taxation of Estates 
and Trusts 

Prerequisite: A 602. Federal in- 
come taxation of estates, trusts, 
grantors, and beneficiaries. Topics 
are simple and complex trusts, 
throwback rules, taxable and dis- 
tributable net income, assignment 
of income concepts and income in 
respect of a decedent, preparation 
of the estate and trust returns. 

A 612 International Taxation 

Prerequisite: A 604. Considera- 
tion of the federal income tax treat- 
ment of nonresident aliens and 
foreign corporations and the for- 
eign income of U.S. residents and 
domestic corporations; compari- 
son of alternative methods of en- 
gaging in operations abroad; for- 
eign tax credit; allocations under 
code Section 482; Section 367 rul- 
ings; and the effect of tax treaties. 

A 613 Taxation of Partnerships 
and Partners 

Prerequisite: A 602. A study of 
the federal income tax problems 
encountered in the formation and 
operation of a partnership, includ- 
ing computations of taxable in- 
come, sale of a partnership inter- 
est, withdrawal of a partner, death 
or retirement of a partner, distri- 
bution of partnership assets, and 
basis adjustments. 

A 614 Federal Tax Practice and 
Procedure 

Prerequisite: A 601. A study of 
the history and organization of the 
Internal Revenue Service, the se- 
lection of returns for audit and the 
review steps at the administrative 
level. Code provisions covered 
will include: filing requirements, 
statutory notices, restriction on as- 
sessment, statute of limitations, re- 
fund procedures, waivers, closing 
agreements, protests and rulings. 



A 615 Research Project in Federal 
Income Taxation 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
in taxation. This course is devoted 
to a study of the techniques and 
tools of tax research. Reference 
sources include tax loose-leaf serv- 
ices, I.R.S. cumulative bulletins, 
court cases, congressional com- 
mittee reports, textbooks, pub- 
lished articles. -Mini research pro- 
jects wlU be assigned for written 
submission. 

A 621 Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 600 or 6 credits in 
financial accounting. Accounting 
analysis for the managerial func- 
tions of planning, controlling and 
evaluating the performance of the 
business firm. 

A 641 Accounting Information 
Systems 

Prerequisite: A 621. An exam- 
ination of the function and lim- 
itations of internal accounting 
information systems and their rela- 
tionship to other decision-oriented 
business information systems. 

A 642 Operational Auditing 

Prerequisite: A 621. An analysis 
of the principles underlying and 
the procedures applying the func- 
tion of auditing the results of firm- 
related business decisions. 

A 650 Advanced Accounting 
Theory 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of interme- 
diate accounting. Considers the 
theoretical aspects of accepted ac- 
counting principles and their sig- 
nificance as a frame of reference 
for the evaluation of accounting 
practices. Considerable attention 
is focused on the role of regula- 
tory agencies and professional ac- 
counting organizaHons with re- 
gard to their influences upon ac- 
counting theory and practice. 



A 651 Financial Accounting 
Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 650. An exami- 
nation and evaluation of current 
literature in external accounting is- 
sues and related fields. 

A 652 Advanced Auditing 

Prerequisite: 3 hours of au- 
diting. An analysis of the contem- 
porary problems surrounding the 
attest function performed by the 
professional independent audi- 
tor. EDP auditing is examined in 
depth. 

A 653 Accounting for the 
Not-for-Profit Organization 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of intermedi- 
ate accounting. An intensive ex- 
amination of the contemporary 
views toward financial reporting 
for the not-for-profit organiza- 
tions. 

A 654 Financial Statements: 
Reporting and Analysis 

Prerequisite: PI 651. An exami- 
nation of financial reporting prac- 
tices for financial statement analy- 
ses in view of modem theoretical 
and empirical financial decision- 
making research. 

A 656 International Accounting 

Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of intermedi- 
ate accounting. An analysis of the 
literature related to the current 
and growing interest in the devel- 
opment of accounting standards 
for business enterprises through- 
out the world. 

A 661 Managerial Accounting 
Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 621. An exami- 
nation and evaluation of current 
literature in internal accounting is- 
sues and related fields. 

A 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. Course may be taken 
more than once. 



COURSES 



85 



A 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the super- 
vision of an advisor. 

A 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

A 696 Independent Study II 

A conhnuation of Independent 
Study I. 

A 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

A 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Civil and 

Environmental 

Engineering 

CE 601 Water Treatment 

Advanced design principles and 
practices in water treatment proc- 
esses; study of unit processes and 
operations; water treatment plant 
design; methods of populaHon 
projection; water distribution sys- 
tems. 

CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 

Advanced design principles and 
practices in sewage treatment 
processes; study of unit processes 
and operations; secondary sewage 
treatment plant design; sludge 
handling and disposal; sewage 
collection systems; introduction to 
advanced treatment methods. 



CE 605 Solid Waste Management 

Characterishcs, volumes, collec- 
tion and disposal of solid waste and 
refuse. Design of processing, re- 
cycling, and recovery equipment, 
landfill design and operarion, 
resource recovery, incineration. 

CE 606 Environmental Law and 
Legislation 

Review and techniques of en- 
forcement of state and federal pol- 
lution control laws and regula- 
tions; effects on waste treatment 
criteria and design and evaluation 
of municipal ordinances; prepara- 
tion of environmental assessments 
and impact statements. 

CE 612 Advanced Wastewater 
Treatment 

Prerequisite: CH 601, which 
may be taken concurrently. Theo- 
ries and principles of advanced 
sewage treatment including nu- 
trient removal, demineralization, 
distillation, ozonation, carbon fil- 
tration, ion exchange, nitrification; 
design of facilities; upgrading sec- 
ondary plants. 

CE 613 Industrial Wastewater 
Control 

Prerequisite: CH 601. Charac- 
teristics of industrial wastes, vol- 
umes, sources, types; methods of 
volume reduction, waste segrega- 
tion, recovery, recycle, and waste 
treatment. 

CE 616 Ground Water Waste 
Disposal 

Study of effects of disposal of 
wastewaters in ground waters; 
travel of pollutants through soU; 
removal of nutrients and 
pollutants by soil interactions; 
leachate identification and control 
from refuse disposal areas. 



CE 670 Special Topics-Civil 
Engineering 

A study of related topics of par- 
ticular interest to students and in- 
structor. Course may be taken 
more than once. 

CE 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 18 graduate hours 
or permission of chairman of the 
Department of Civil Engineering 
and advisor. Independent study 
under the guidance of an advisor 
into an area of mutual interest, 
each study terminating in a tech- 
nical report of academic merit. Re- 
search may be in such environ- 
mental areas as water resources, 
stream pollution, solid waste man- 
agement or air pollution. 

CE 695 Independent Study in 
Environmental Engineering I 

Prerequisite: permission of pro- 
gram coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of an ad- 
visor into an area designated by 
the program coordinator. 

CE 696 Independent Study II 

A conhnuation of Independent 
Study I. 

CE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

CE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Chemistry 



CH 601 Environmental Chemistry 

Advanced study of the chemical 
reactions necessary to understand 
the impact that man's activities 
have on the environment. Areas 
considered include water and air 
pollution, power generation, and 
the release and use of industrial or- 
ganic chemicals. 

CH 611 Special Topics in 
Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Advanced course dealing with 
topics such as stereochemistry, 
photochemistry, natural products 
and mechanisms of organic re- 
actions. 

CH 621 Chemical Forensic 
Analysis with Laboratory 

A course intended to present 
advanced techniques and new de- 
velopments in the identification of 
various materials such as pig- 
ments, dyestuffs, food additives, 
pharmaceutical preparations, pol- 
ymers, synthetic fibers, and inor- 
ganic material products. Labora- 
tory fee required. 4 credit hours. 

CH 625 Chemistry of Fires and 
Explosions 

An examination of the basic or- 
ganic chemistry and combustion 
and explosive properties of flam- 
mable materials. The chemical 
principles underlying fires and ex- 
plosions. Chemical properties of 
various synthetic materials, and 
the products of their combustion. 
Fire retardent materials and chem- 
icals used in fire extinguishment. 

CH 631 Advances in Analytical 
Chemistry 

A course intended to provide 
background for the recent ad- 
vances made in instrumentation 
and current analytical techniques. 



CH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
Hcular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

CH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

CH 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

CH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: Completion of 15 
credits of graduate work. Periodic 
meetings and discussion of the in- 
dividual student's progress in the 
preparation of a thesis. 

CH 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 

Criminal Justice 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal 
Relations 

Interpersonal communicahon in 
teaching, supervision and in vari- 
ous work relationships. The crim- 
inal justice worker as a resource 
person and facilitator of others is 
stressed. Humanistic psychology 
and interpersonal psychology pro- 
vide the theoretical base. 

CJ 604 Seminar in Theory and 
Philosophy of Law 

The theory and philosophy of 
law and the relationship between 
law and society. Emphasis on the 
nature of the judicial process, the 
issues of law and personal moral- 
ity, nonvictim crimes, and the rela- 
tionship of enforcement agencies 
to the rules of law. 



CJ 605 Social Deviance 

A survey of theories relating to 
the scope and nature of the crime 
problem. Consideration of the 
problems of deviancy, including 
social norms deviancy, mental dis- 
turbances, juvenile crime, and the 
various possible and actual re- 
sponses to deviancy. Various ap- 
proaches to the problem of reha- 
bilitation. 

CJ 607 Seminar in Criminal 
Justice Institutions 

The machinery of justice in 
theory and practice. The rule of 
law and its expectations in the ac- 
tual administration of justice. Em- 
phasis of the progressive changes 
in the development of children's 
and adolescents' courts, probation 
and classification clinics. Crime 
prevention and reforms of the 
criminal law. Special problems of 
justice and the poor. Administra- 
tive denials of justice, the insane 
offender, the white-collar criminal 
and social reconstruction through 
law. 

CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

Comprehensive analysis of the 
rules of evidence. Topics include 
judicial notice, presumptions, the 
nature of real and circumstantial 
evidence, hearsay evidence, con- 
fessions and admissions and wit- 
nesses. Emphasis on evidence in 
criminal cases. 

CJ 609 Criminological Theory 

An analytical review of the mul- 
tidisciplinary theories of criminal 
behavior. The impact of various 
theoretical constructs and con- 
cepts on practice will be critically 
evaluated. 



COURSES 



87 



CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

A study of all the steps of the 
criminal justice system from the 
time the accused is arrested until 
sentencing to a correctional facility 
with an objective to review all the 
problems which arise during this 
process and to consider some pos- 
sible soluHons which will benefit 
the individual being processed 
without subverting the purposes 
of the process. 

CJ 612 Criminal Justice 
Management 

The development of the theory 
and practice of criminal justice 
management in the United States. 
Significant developments and 
ideas of those who have made ma- 
jor contributions to American 
criminal justice management. 

CJ 614 Survey of Forensic Science 

An introductory survey of fo- 
rensic sciences and criminalistics, 
crime scene procedures and docu- 
mentation, and methods of labora- 
tory analysis for students specializ- 
ing in security and investigation. 

CJ 616 Advanced Crime Scene 
Investigation 

An in-depth study of crime 
scene procedures, including rec- 
ognition, protection, documen- 
tation and collection of physical 
evidence, scene documentation, 
scene search procedures, and re- 
constructions from evidence and 
scene patterns. 

CJ 618 Probation and Parole: 
Theory and Practice 

The philosophy, theory and 
methods employed in probation, 
parole and institutional treatment 
of the offender. The role of au- 
thority, casework, classification, 
treatment policy and administra- 
tive organizaHon in determining 
the consequences of correctional 
practice. 



CJ 619 Seminar in Comparative 
Criminal Justice Systems 

Prerequisite: CJ 610. A cross- 
cultural study of police, court and 
correctional systems and methods. 

CJ 620 Advanced Criminalistics 1 

The comparison and individual- 
ization of physical evidence by bio- 
logical and chemical properties is 
presented in lectures and carried 
out in the laboratory. The theories 
and practice of microscopic, bio- 
logical, immunological and chem- 
ical analysis are applied to the ex- 
amination of blood, saliva, seme- 
nal fluid, hair, Hssues, botanical 
evidence and other material of fo- 
rensic interest. 

CJ 621 Advanced Criminalistics I 

1 credit hour. Laboratory fee 
required. 

CJ 622 Learning Theory: 
Applications in Criminal Justice 

Applications of the psychology 
of learning to police and correction 
settings. 

CJ 624 Group Process in Criminal 
Justice 

Small group interaction; both 
theoretical and experimental fac- 
ets of group process are presented. 
Group counseling and encounter 
groups. 

CJ 628 Introduction to Systems 
Theory 

Concepts of systems theory and 
systems analysis in contemporary 
socio-technical environments. 



CJ 630 Delinquency and Juvenile 
Crime 

Prerequisite: CJ 610. A general 
introduction to the field of delin- 
quency and crime, including all as- 
pects of the social, legal and per- 
sonal matrix out of which these 
forms of behavior emerge. Spe- 
cial emphasis will be given to the 
process and implications of delin- 
quency labeling. 

CJ 632 Advanced Investigation I 

An in-depth study of modern 
principles and techniques of crimi- 
nal and civil investigations. Man- 
agement of investigations, use of 
witnesses, interviewing, poly- 
graph, backgrounds establish- 
ment of MO, missing persons, sur- 
veillance, and investigation of 
questioned deaths and death 
scenes. 

CJ 633 Advanced Investigation II 

An in-depth study of the prin- 
ciples and techniques of criminal 
and civil investigations. Investi- 
gation of fraud, embezzlement, 
white collar crime, property 
crimes, sexual assaults and other 
crimes against persons, extortion, 
kidnapping, drug trade, and traf- 
fic accidents. 

CJ 635 Statistics in the Public 
Sector 

Statistical techniques applied to 
the public sector. DescripHve sta- 
tistics: measures of central tend- 
ency and variability. Introduction 
to statistical inference including 
sampling distributions and tests of 
significance. Some techniques of 
nonparametric statistics, multiple 
regression and elementary deci- 
sion theory. Analysis of variance 
and covariance. 



CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in 
Criminal Justice 

Topics selected by students re- 
lating to current issues and con- 
cerns in the field of criminal jus- 
tice. Each student will be required 
to write a paper and deliver an oral 
presentation on a selected topic. 

CJ 640 Advanced Criminalistics II 

Advanced microscopic, chem- 
ical and instrumental methods wUl 
be introduced with extensive 
"hands-on" experience provided 
by a laboratory section. Principles 
and methods of analysis of micro- 
scopic and macroscopic evidence 
such as glass, soil, papers, inks, 
dyes, paints, varnishes, explo- 
sives, fibers, drugs and other po- 
tential physical traces will be dis- 
cussed in class. 

TJ 641 Advanced 
Criminalistics II 

1 credit hour. Laboratory fee 
required. 

CJ 644 Police in Urban Society 

An introduction to some of the 
current thinking and problems of 
policing in urban society. The 
course will examine such issues as 
the historical growth of the police, 
the role and mission of the police, 
measurement of the poHce tasks, 
police corruption and other topics 
of interest to the seminar mem- 
bers. The course will stress the de- 
velopment of analyhc thinking in 
defining and dealing with police 
problems. 

CJ 649 Fire Scene Investigation 
and Arson Analysis 

The techniques of crime scene doc- 
umentation and investigation as 
they relate to fire and explosion 
scenes. Evidence recognition and 
collection. Laboratory analysis of 
fire scene, arson accelerant and ex- 
plosion scene residues. Scientific 
proof of arson. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 4 credit hours 



CJ 651 Problems in the 
Administration of Justice 

A study of the interaction be- 
tween the law enforcement official 
and the accused beginning with 
detention and/or arrest, during 
which time the official is seeking to 
secure incriminating evidence ef- 
fectively while still protecting the 
Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Amend- 
ment constitutional rights of the 
"presumed innocent" accused. 

CJ 653 Physical Analysis in 
Forensic Science 

The classic firearms examina- 
tion, classification and comparison 
of bullets and cartridges, tool- 
marks comparison and striation 
analysis, serial number restora- 
tion, document examination, voice 
print identification, fingerprints 
and polygraphy examination. 

CJ 654 Physical Analysis in 
Forensic Science 

1 credit hour. Laboratory fee 
required. 

CJ 655 Bureaucratic Organization 
of Criminal Justice 

Prerequisite: CJ 610. Through an 
applicahon of modem organiza- 
tional theory, a critical analysis of 
criminal justice agencies will be 
made. Emphasis will be placed on 
viewing criminal justice in theo- 
retical perspective. Linkages be- 
tween theory and operationaliza- 
tion of principles wifl be made. 

CJ 658 Psychiatry and the Law 

An examination of issues that 
relate to the interaction between 
the law and mental illness and the 
general role of forensic psychiatry. 



CJ 660 Forensic Microscopy 

Basic techniques of optical mi- 
croscopy and the development of 
operational skills for the use of the 
microscope as a tool of evidence 
detection and evaluation. Micro- 
scopical measurements and ana- 
lytical methods will be covered. 
Laboratory fee required. 4 credit 
hours. 

CJ 661 Medicolegal Investigation 
and Identification 

An introduction to procedures 
and techniques for medicolegal in- 
vestigation of questioned death, 
and identification of deceased per- 
sons, including autopsy tech- 
nique, odontological procedures 
and anthropological approaches. 

CJ 662 Forensic Toxicology 

An in-depth analysis of forensic 
toxi procedures and methods, de- 
termination of metallic, volatile 
and soluble poisons, analysis for 
narcotic drugs, other drugs of 
abuse, and dosage form or from 
drugs that are commonly abused. 
Laboratory fee required. 4 credit 
hours. 

CJ 663 Advanced Forensic 
Serology I 

A comprehensive study of the 
theory and practice of biochemical 
and immunological procedures for 
blood and body fluid identifica- 
tion; ABO grouping procedures 
for whole blood and bloodstains; 
typing of Rh, MNSs and other red 
cell antigens in blood and blood 
stains; antiserum selection and 
evaluation. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 4 credit hours. 



COURSES 



CJ 664 Advanced Forensic 
Serology II 

A comprehensive study of the 
theory and practice of isoenzyme, 
serum protein and immunoglob- 
ulin genetic markers in human 
blood and body fluids. Electro- 
phoreHc and isoelectric focusing 
techniques. Interpretation of ge- 
netic marker results in blood indi- 
vidualization. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 4 credit hours. 

CJ 665 Legal Aspects of Fire and 
Arson Investigation 

The legal principles underlying 
and governing the conduct of 
criminal investigations, with par- 
ticular emphasis on arson. The 
criminal law relating to arson, es- 
tabhshment of the crime, invesh- 
gation and prosecution proce- 
dures in arson cases. 

CJ 667 Fire and Building Codes, 
Standards and Practices 

The study of building and fire 
codes and regulations, as they re- 
late to the prevention and inci- 
dence of structural fires. Contem- 
porary building and fire codes and 
practices, and their enforcement. 
Model building codes. Fire pre- 
vention and control through build- 
ing design. 

CJ 668 Fire and Casualty 
Insurance Practices 

A study of financial risk and de- 
cision making from the investiga- 
hve point of view. Insurance rate 
making and relation to risk and 
other factors. Insurance adjust- 
ment and economic factors that 
must be considered in fire and ac- 
cident investigations. 



CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and 
Prevention of Structural Fires 

A detailed analysis of the evolu- 
tion of modem structures, and the 
mechanical systems necessary to 
provide safety and comfort. The 
effect of the nature of structures 
and their mechanical systems on 
fire behavior. Structural bases and 
mechanical systems for fire protec- 
tion and fire prevention. 

CJ 670 Selected Issues 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

CJ 672 Innovative Treatment 
Programs in Corrections 

The theory and practice of a 
wide range of innovaHve correc- 
tional treatment modalities will be 
analyzed. Students will be given 
the opportunity to parhcipate in 
various experiential exercises and 
to develop and propose new treat- 
ment approaches. 

CJ 673 Biomedical Methods in 
Forensic Science 

Methods and application of 
modern toxicology, biochemistry, 
pathology, dentistry and medicine 
in forensic science. 

CJ 674 Biomedical Methods in 
Forensic Science 

1 credit hour. Laboratory fee 
required. 

CJ 675 Private Security Law 

A review and examination of 
currently applicable Federal and 
State administrative, civil, crimi- 
nal and constitutional laws as they 
relate to the private security indus- 
try. The framework of the course 
will include sources of authority 
and common law. 



CJ 676 Security Management 
Seminar 

Current problems, concerns, is- 
sues, and legislation affecting the 
private security industry as they 
relate to and are of interest to the 
students and instructor. 

CJ 677 Private Security in Modem 
Society 

An introduction to current 
thinking and problems relating to 
the private security industry. The 
course will examine such issues as 
historical growth, role, mission, 
and future of the industry. Other 
topics will include professionaliza- 
tion and ethics in the private se- 
curity field. 

CJ 690 Research Project I 

Individual guidance on a re- 
search endeavor. 1-3 credits. 

CJ 691 Research Project II 

Prerequisite: CJ 690. 1-3 credits. 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice 
Internship I 

The student's formal educa- 
tional development will be com- 
plemented by field placement ex- 
perience in various criminal justice 
settings or agencies. Field experi- 
ence will be supervised by desig- 
nated agency and departmental 
personnel. 

CJ 694 Criminal Justice 
Internship II 

Prerequisite: CJ 693. 

CJ 695 Independent Study 

Student will engage in a di- 
rected independent learning expe- 
rience, the topic and format to be 
agreed upon by the student and 
supervising faculty. 1-3 credits. 



CJ 697 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress toward the completion of the 
thesis. 

CJ 698 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: CJ 697. A continua- 
tion of Thesis 1. 

CJ 699 Thesis III 

A continuation of Thesis II. 

Communication 

CO 601 Basics of Business Media 
Production Techniques 

This course will provide a sur- 
vey of the implementation of var- 
ious media in the produchon of in- 
structional and promotional mate- 
rials specifically for the small and 
medium business and corporate 
media departments. The course 
will emphasize both theoretical 
and practical problems of audio 
and visual systems available to the 
business situation, paying particu- 
lar attention to the vocabulary and 
skills which make it possible to 
transfer an idea from the board 
room to an effective media presen- 
tation. Laboratory fee required. 

CO 605 Planning Audio Visual 
Systems for Business 

Prerequisite: CO 601. This 
course will use the technology 
learned in the basic course, and 
apply this to the planning of an 
audiovisual center within a busi- 
ness or corporation setting. Stu- 
dents will be involved in projects 
of design and budget. 



CO 609 Scripting the Media 
Presentation 

This course is designed to show 
the student how to select the me- 
dium appropriate to the message, 
write a treatment, develop a story 
board, script the message and use 
proper format. 

CO 613 Media Presentations for 
Business 

Prerequisite: CO 601, CO 609. 
TTiis course is designed to provide 
the student with an opportunity to 
produce a major instructional or 
promotional media project for a 
specific business or corporation. 
The student will be responsible for 
finding a sponsor for this project 
which will be produced in one or 
any of the audio/visual formats 
discussed and practiced in pre- 
requisite courses. Laboratory fee 
required. 

CO 621 The Communication 
Process 

Major emphasis on the role of 
communication in a democracy 
and the effects of communication 
content. Brief treatment of content 
analysis techniques, person-to- 
person communication and barri- 
ers to the flow of communication. 

CO 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
advisor. An in-depth examination 
of a topic in the field of communi- 
cation which reflects the special re- 
search of a faculty member, or the 
special interest of a group of stu- 
dents. May be taken more than 
once. 

CO 693 Internship 

A program of field experience 
set up by the student and ap- 
proved by the program advisor 
under the tutelage of a profes- 
sional in the field. 



CO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study or research in communi- 
cahon under the supervision of a 
member of the faculty. 

CO 696 Independent Study II 

A continuaHon of Independent 
Study 1. 

CO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meefings with the advisor 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparafion of a thesis. 

CO 699 Thesis II 

A continuaHon of Thesis I. 



Economics 

EC 600 Basic Economics 

A basic theoretical foundation 
for students who have a deficiency 
in economics. The course is a re- 
view and refresher of basic eco- 
nomic principles. No credit. 

EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
Principles of Economics or EC 600, 
Basic Economics. Topics in re- 
source allocation and price deter- 
mination. Theories of choice of 
consumers, firms, resource own- 
ers under monopoly, monopsony, 
competition and alternative mar- 
ket forms. 

EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
Principles of Economics or EC 600, 
Basic Economics. An examination 
of the roles of consumption, in- 
vestment, government finance 
and money influencing national 
income and output, employment, 
the price level and rate of growth. 
Policies for economic stability and 
growth. 



COURSES 



EC 608 Economics for Public 
Administrators 

An examination of the roles of 
consumption, investment, gov- 
ernment expenditure and money 
influencing national income, out- 
put, employment and price level, 
and growth rate. Special emphasis 
upon the roles of fiscal and mone- 
tary policy and the economics of 
contemporary social problems. 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

A survey of the problems, strat- 
egies and policies of manage- 
ment and unions in conflict situ- 
ations and in harmonizing labor- 
management relations. Labor leg- 
islation, collective bargaining and 
alternattve strategies, productiv- 
ity and other problem areas in 
labor-management relations are 
examined. 

EC 627 Economics of Labor 
Relations 

A survey of labor economics and 
the economics of labor relations 
using both the tools of economic 
analysis and institutional analysis. 
The emphasis is on the application 
of economics to labor problems 
and labor-management relations. 

EC 629 Public Policies Toward 
Business 

A survey of the economic as- 
pects of governmental and busi- 
ness relations. Emphasizes the 
concept of public control over cer- 
tain types of business and certain 
forms of business activity. Com- 
bination movements, pricing pro- 
cedures, anti-trust laws and agen- 
cies enforcing them, regulation 
of transportation and public util- 
ities, rate-making for transport, 
pricing public utility services, con- 
sumer protection and social re- 
sponsibility. 



EC 630 Structure of American 
Industry 

An examination of several major 
U.S. industries such as automo- 
biles, steel, petroleum, defense 
and agriculture. Some contempo- 
rary problems are analyzed. A 
study of the powerful economic 
forces acting on these industries 
and how firms react to these 
forces. 

EC 633 Managerial Economics 

Prerequisite: EC 603. A study of 
the application of the major tools 
of economic analysis to the prob- 
lems encountered by management 
in the organization of the firm. 
Topics include the theory and 
measurement of consumer de- 
mand, measurement and control 
of costs, the effects of public policy 
upon managerial decisions and 
pricing techniques and the alloca- 
tion of capital within the firm. 

EC 635 Comparative Economic 
Systems 

Capitalism, Socialism, Commu- 
nism and other economic systems 
will be examined with respect to 
their theoretical foundations and 
practical applications, including 
the interrelationships among eco- 
nomic, political and social insti- 
tutions. 



EC 641 International Economics 

A study of the basic theory and 
major instituhons of international 
economic relations. Examines crit- 
ically the techniques and back- 
ground of protectionism and free 
trade, and the analysis of customs, 
unions and price and exchange 
rate changes. The theory of com- 
parative advantage; the gains from 
trade and the terms of trade. The 
balance of payments and national 
income. Capital movements and 
economic growth. The evolution 
of the world economy and intema- 
Honal economic inshtutions. Ef- 
fects of growth on trade, and trade 
on growth. Monopolistic practices 
in international trade. The inter- 
naHonal monetary system and in- 
ternational monetary reforms. 

EC 645 Seminar in 
Macroeconomic Policy 

Prerequisite: EC 604. The impact 
of fiscal and monetary policy upon 
employment, output and prices. 
An analysis of past and current 
economic controls and their im- 
pact upon the economy. 

EC 650 Economics of Petroleum 

A survey of the economic devel- 
opment and growth of the Ameri- 
can oil industry as part of the inter- 
national oil industry. Economic 
aspects of the energy crisis, oil re- 
serves, conservation, OPEC, U.S. 
energy conservaHon program, 
oil pricing, and oil substitutes. 
Policies of oil exporting nations, 
oil companies and oil consumer 
nations throughout the world will 
be given special attention. 



EC 653 Econometrics 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 
604-605, or permission of the in- 
structor. A presentation of the 
important statistical concepts used 
in econometrics. Topics covered 
are regression theory, multiple re- 
gression, regression extensions, 
correlation, serial correlation, cor- 
related regressor and error, the 
identification problem, selected 
estimating techniques. 

EC 665 Urban and Regional 
Economic Development 

Structure of the urban and re- 
gional economy; goals, processes, 
problems and policy in urban and 
regional economic development. 

EC 668 Economics of Crime 

Topics include the economic 
costs of crime; the costs of pre- 
venting crime; the impact of white 
collar crime on American society 

EC 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

Prerequisite: EC 625. Emphasis 
on the negotiating process. The la- 
bor contract as it involves wages, 
worker security, management au- 
thority and handling of grievances 
arising during the life of the 
contract. 

EC 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the super- 
vision of an advisor. 

EC 692 Readings in Economics 

EC 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 



EC 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

EC 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

EC 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis 1. 

Electrical 
Engineering 

EE 603 Discrete and Continuous 
Systems I 

Prerequisite: M 624. Discrete 
and continuous linear system 
models. State variable representa- 
tion and transfer function repre- 
sentation. Feedback control sys- 
tems, stability, performance and 
design criteria. State variable and 
compensation synthesis. Nonlin- 
ear systems, describing functions 
and phase plane techniques. Sta- 
bility methods of Liapunov. 

EE 604 Discrete and Continuous 
Systems II 

Prerequisite; EE 603. 

EE 605 Modern Control Systems 

Prerequisite: EE 604. Advanced 
topics in control systems. May in- 
clude optimal control, dynamic 
programming, variational ap- 
proaches, adaptive control, sam- 
pled data systems, signal mod- 
ulated systems, random signal 
methods. 

EE 608 Computer- Aided Design 

Prerequisite: M 624. Numerical 
algorithms for engineering sys- 
tems analysis. The design problem 
and performance measures. Opti- 
nvization of networks and filters. 
Parameter sensitivities. Device 
modeling and equivalent circuits. 



EE 615 Introduction to Computer 
Logic 

Prerequisite: IE 603 (or equiv- 
alent). Introduction to logic ele- 
ments and to their apphcation in 
digital networks for processing 
numerical data. The course deals 
with analysis and design tech- 
niques of combinational and se- 
quential networks and includes a 
discussion of logic variables, 
switching functions, optimal real- 
izations, multivariable systems. 
Design examples will include logic 
circuits for addition, multiplica- 
tion, counting, parity generation 
and detection. 

EE 630 Electronic 
Instrumentation I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Design of modem elec- 
tronic instrumentation. Circuit 
and system examples, evaluation 
and design techniques. Emphasis 
on practical applications including 
design theory and the circuit tech- 
niques used in linear integrated 
devices. Variety of electronic in- 
strumentation including computer 
interfaces, signal conditioners, 
waveform generators and shap- 
ers, filters, V/F, A/D, D/A convert- 
ers and other special purpose 
circuits. 

EE 631 Electronic 
Instrumentation II 

Prerequisite: EE 630. 

EE 634 Digital Signal Processing I 

Prerequisite: EE 603. A study of 
the theories of digital signal proc- 
essing and their applications. 
Topics include discrete time sig- 
nals, Z transform, the discrete 
Fourier Transform, the FFT, digi- 
tal filter design techniques, ho- 
momorphic signal processing and 
various applications of digital sig- 
nal processing. 



COURSES 



93 



EE 635 Digital Signal 
Processing 11 

Prerequisite: EE 634. 

EE 640 Computer Engineering 1 

A study of computer structure 
and organization. Peripheral de- 
vices, addressing memory, assem- 
bler instruction set, programmed 
requests, real-time software mod- 
ules, assembler language pro- 
gramming. Laboratory fee 
required. 

EE 641 Computer Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE 640. Applica- 
tions of computers to physical sys- 
tems for monitor control func- 
tions. Interfacing using hardware 
modules. Case studies may in- 
clude synchronous motor tran- 
sient studies, shock wave phe- 
nomena, dynamic chemical 
reaction monitoring and control, 
signal processing, sampled data 
control systems. Students must 
complete a project. Laboratory fee 
required. 

EE 645 Power Systems 
Engineering I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Concepts and methods of 
analysis and design of modern 
power systems will be treated. 
This will include the network rep- 
resentation of power systems, ma- 
trix methods, symmetrical compo- 
nents and the use of the computer 
in the solution of problems such 
as short circuit fault calculations, 
load flow study, economic load 
dispatching and stability. Other 
topics may include protection, re- 
laying or transmission system de- 
sign. 

EE 646 Power Systems 
Engineering 11 

Prerequisite: EE 645. 



EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 

A study of the theory of random 
signals and processes. Topics in- 
clude a review of probability, ran- 
dom signals, auto and cross cor- 
relation, power density, spectral 
analysis of random signals. 

EE 658 Microprocessors — Theory 
& Applications 

Prerequisite: EE 640. A study of 
the techniques and methods of de- 
signing digital systems using a mi- 
croprocessor as the basic unit. Mi- 
crocomputer assembly language, 
operating systems, input/output 
devices, programmable read-only 
memories and interfacing. 

EE 670 Special Topics — Electrical 
Engineering 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. A study of selected topics 
of particular interest to students 
and instructor. Course may be 
taken more than once. 

EE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. A planned program of 
individual study or research un- 
der the supervision of a faculty 
member. 

EE 696 Independent Study II 

A conhnuation of Independent 
Study I. 

EE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of 15 
credits of graduate work. Individ- 
ual student project under super- 
vision of faculty advisor. Written 
and oral report required. Student 
must enroll in 6 credits of thesis. 

EE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Executive M.B.A. 

The program consists of twenty 
(20) courses, each four sessions in 
length. The courses are grouped 
into logically interrelated clusters, 
i.e.. The Quantitative Group, The 
Industrial Relations Group, The 
Finance Group, The Marketing 
Group, and the Management 
Group. 

EXID 903 The Communication 
Process 

Communication needs in cor- 
porate staff development, cohe- 
sion, cooperation, and consensus 
through effecHve communication 
management. The role of commu- 
nication in thought processes and 
problem solving. 

Quantitative Group 

EXlD 936 Statistics and 
Forecasting 

Examination of the utility and 
method of traditional statistical 
techniques as aids in the decision 
making process. Topics include 
descriptive and inferential statis- 
tics, regression, time series and an 
introduction to forecasting. 

EXID 915 Quantitative Decision 
Making 

Examination of staHstical meth- 
ods and their relevance to decision 
making under uncertainty. In- 
cludes an introduction to probabil- 
ity, elements of statistical decision 
theory and Bayesian analysis. 

EXID 918 Managerial Economics 

ApplicaHon of economic analy- 
sis to business forecasting plan- 
ning and policy formation. Top- 
ics include cost-benefit analysis, 
cost estimahon and break-even 
analysis. 



EXID 939 Operations Research 
and Management 

Analysis of management sci- 
ence techniques from the execu- 
tive perspective. Focus on under- 
standing the value of inventory 
and systems models, forecasting 
methods and simulation tech- 
niques. 

EXID 960 Computers and 
Management 

Analysis of the uses and abuses 
of management information sys- 
tems as well as hardware and soft- 
ware acquisition. 

Industrial Relations Group 

EXID 909 Business and 
Government Relations 

Recent developments and fu- 
ture directions of the business and 
government interface. Includes 
contracts, affirmative action, labor 
negotiation machinery, regulatory 
agencies and anti-trust legislation. 

EXID 948 Labor and Management 
Relations 

Contemporary issues in labor- 
management relations are ana- 
lyzed including collective bar- 
gaining, grievance-arbitration 
procedures and the expanding im- 
pact of organized labor on man- 
power management. 

EXID 945 Human Resources 
Management 

The effective management of 
the aggregate human resource in 
the modern organizahon. Analy- 
sis of personnel policies and pro- 
cedures, manpower planning and 
employee training and policies. 



Finance Group 

EXID 924 Financial 
Management I 

Analysis of financial decision 
models for investment, financing 
and dividend decisions of the 
profit-oriented firm. Includes cap- 
ital budgeting, capital structure 
and the cost of capital and divi- 
dend policy. 

EXID 927 Financial 
Management II 

Analysis of financial decision 
models for the management of 
working capital. The management 
of current assets and the related 
financing mixture. 

EXID 912 Financial Accounting 

Analysis of the objectives, 
standards and methods embodied 
in the financial accounting infor- 
mation system. Emphasis is upon 
financial reporting standards as 
they relate to financial position, re- 
sults of operaHons and changes in 
financial position. 

EXID 942 Managerial Accounting 

Examination of accounting tools 
for planning, controlling and eval- 
uating the economic performance 
of the firm. Topics include budge- 
ting, flexible budgets, standard 
costs, contribution reporting, re- 
sponsibility accounting and deci- 
sion analysis. 

Marketing Group 

EXID 933 International Business 

Examination of the theory of in- 
ternational trade, exporting and 
importing, cultural dynamics and 
comparative management and 
marketing systems. 



EXID 930 Marketing 
Management 

The marketing concept and cor- 
porate decision making with re- 
spect to product planning, ad- 
vertising and promotion, sales 
management, distribution chan- 
nels and price policies. 

EXID 951 Marketing 
Management Seminar 

Current issues and topics in 
marketing management. Includes 
recent regulatory rulings, consum- 
erism and related areas. 

Management Group 

EXID 906 The Management 
Process 

The role of executives and man- 
agers in administrative and 
operational processes. Topics in- 
clude organizational goals and 
structure, planning and perform- 
ance controls and resource 
management. 

EXID 954 Organizational 
Development 

Various methods for effective or- 
ganizational development in con- 
temporary environments. Analy- 
sis of means to improve existing 
organizations in consideration of 
past history and changing value 
structures. 

EXID 957 Corporate Policy and 
Strategy 

Analytical frameworks are de- 
veloped through the study of ma- 
jor corporate policies and strate- 
gies. Focus is upon the total 
organization and comprehensive 
operation procedures of the com- 
plex corporation. 



COURSES 



95 



EXID 921 Executive Development 
Seminar 

Mechanisms for identifying and 
discussing the developmental 
needs of subordinate managers 
are discussed. Using subordinate 
involvement in decision-making 
as a vehicle, several management 
development techniques are ex- 
amined including contrived and 
actual cases, role playing, individ- 
ual feedback and group exercises. 
The module is concluded by a 
computerized business game in 
which participants may utilize the 
knowledge obtained in earlier 
modules to manage firms in 
competition. 



Finance 

FI 615 Finance 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 
604, QA 605, A 621. The invest- 
ment, financing and valuation of 
business firms. Topics include: 
discounted cash flow, return on 
investment, investment decisions 
under uncertainty, long- and 
short-term sources of funds, 
optimal financial structure, cost of 
capital, dividend policy. (Expan- 
sion, merger, working capital 
management and failure and reor- 
ganization may also be covered.) 



FI 617 Financial Institutions and 
Capital Markets 

Prerequisites: FI 651, FI 615. This 
course stresses the financial man- 
agement of financial institutions 
and capital market. Analyzes the 
institutional and theoretical struc- 
ture of monetary change and the 
manner in which financial institu- 
tions and markets transmit and in- 
fluence the impact of monetary 
policy. Special attention to the role 
of non-monetary financial inter- 
mediaries, the structure and regu- 
lation of capital markets, and the 
funcrions of market yields as the 
price mechanism that allocates 
saving to various categories of eco- 
nomic investments. 

FI 619 Monetary and Central 
Banking Policy 

Prerequisite: FI 615. The impact 
of monetary change upon employ- 
ment, output and prices; the for- 
mulation and execution of Federal 
Reserve policy designed to regu- 
late money, credit and interest 
rates. 

FI 620 Working Capital 
Management and Planning 

Prerequisites: FI 615, FI 617, FI 
651 or permission of instructor. 
The examination and understand- 
ing of working capital manage- 
ment, leasing, mergers, and ac- 
quisitions and overview of 
multinational finance. 



FI 649 Security Analysis 

Prerequisite: FI 651. An analysis 
of the determinants of valuation 
for fixed income securities, com- 
mon stocks, convertible securities 
and common stock warrants. Em- 
phasis is placed upon the informa- 
tion and techniques relevant to se- 
curity valuahon and selection and 
the structure and workings of the 
securities markets. 

FI 651 Portfolio Management and 
Capital Market Analysis 

Prerequisites: FI 615, QA 605 or 
permission of instructor. Consid- 
ers the theoretical structure for the 
procedures (security analysis, 
portfolio analysis and portfolio se- 
lection) which conshtute the proc- 
ess of portfolio management, as 
well as their limitations in practice. 
Additional attention is placed 
upon the logical implicahons of 
portfolio analysis for capital mar- 
ket theory. 

FI 655 Commodity Market 
Analysis 

Prerequisites: FI 617, FI 651. A 
conceptual and operational exam- 
ination of the markets in which 
commodities are traded, the par- 
ticipants and major exchanges 
including an analysis of the ma- 
jor commodities traded and the 
factors influencing their prices. 
Option valuation theory is also 
covered. 



FI 645 Corporate Financial 
Theory 

Prerequisites: FI 617, FI 651. An 
analysis of the theoretical struc- 
ture supporting optimum financial 
decision making by the business 
firm. Emphasis is placed upon the 
determination of the combination 
of investment, financing and divi- 
dend decisions that maximizes the 
valuation of the firm within a secu- 
rity market context. 



FI 661 Real Estate: Principles and 
Practices 

Prerequisite: FI 615. Real estate 
from the investor's point of view. 
Impact of taxation on real estate in- 
vestments. Emphasis on commer- 
cial land use through the use of 
case studies and problems. 



FI 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

FI 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the super- 
vision of an advisor. 

FI 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

FI 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

FI 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

FI 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Hotel/Restaurant 
Management, 
Dietetics, and 
Tourism 
Administration 

HM 610 Content Seminar in 
Hotel/Restaurant Management 
and Dietetics 

Detailed analysis of recent de- 
velopments in food service, lodg- 
ing and dietary administration. 
Attention will be given to quality 
assurance and determination of 
job priorities. 



HM 625 Supervisory and 
Leadership Development in Hotel 
and Restaurant Operations 

An incident approach is used to 
provide a cross section of super- 
visory situations in hotel and res- 
taurant management. Emphasis is 
given to particular situations in- 
volving leadership developments, 
ethical behavior and formal and 
informal organizations of social 
behavior. 

HM 630 Personnel and 

Labor Relations in 

Hotel and Restaurant Operations 

Topics include organizational 
behavior, personnel selection, 
placement, supervision, job eval- 
uation, wage and salary adminis- 
tration, motivation morale and 
union-management relations. 
Case studies and role playing are 
integral parts of the course. 

HM 635 Applied Dietetics for 
Health Care Professionals 

A critical appraisal of persons 
with medical and physical prob- 
lems. The interpretation of dietary 
and biochemical information gath- 
ered on those persons, followed 
by the nutritional intervention 
needed. Recommendations will be 
based on metabolic requirements, 
monitoring laboratory values, pre- 
scribed medicahons, the nutri- 
tional status of the person and the 
severity of the disease. 

HM 640 Haute Cuisine for 
Hospitality Executives 

An advanced course which cov- 
ers the study and preparation of 
classical food items and service of 
the major world cuisines. Empha- 
sis is placed on the geographical, 
socioeconorrucal and religious in- 
fluences which determine cultural 
patterns of cuisine. Laboratory fee 
required. 



HM 655 Development of 

Hotel/Restaurant/Institutional 

Operations 

Examines the processes for de- 
veloping profitable hotel, restau- 
rant and insHtutional services. 
Some of the characteristics, op- 
portunities, risks and decisions 
involved in starting hospitality, 
dietary and institutional food ser- 
vices are studied. Emphasis is on 
alternative financing and develop- 
ment of dietary departments by 
a clinical administrator. 

HM 660 Comparative Tourism 

A detailed study of tourism de- 
velopment within mainstream, 
destination countries. An in-depth 
evaluation of the selected foreign 
countries in relationship to tour- 
ism and the political, geographi- 
cal, agricultural, religious, climati- 
cal, and socioeconomic status. 

HM 670 Special Topics in 
Hotel/Restaurant Management 
and Dietetics 

An in-depth examinahon of 
topics in the fields of hotel, restau- 
rant and dietetics which reflects 
the special interest of a group of 
students. Focus will be on the 
managerial skills needed for or- 
ganizational decision making, ag- 
gregation of resources, political 
power within the organization and 
the allocaHon of resources and 
work flow. The study of the dieh- 
Han as manager in a clinical de- 
partment of a health care facility 
will be examined. 



COURSES 



HM 690 Research in 
Hotel/Restaurant Management 
and Dietetics 

Emphasis will focus toward the 
individual student and individual 
interests that may be applicable to 
current research in hospitality, 
medical and nutritional literature. 
Trends toward modification of 
standard prescribed diet therapy 
can be explored. Research must be 
conducted under the supervision 
of a faculty member. 

HM 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a faculty member. 

HM 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

HM 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours, 
permission of an advisor. Periodic 
meetings and discussions of the 
individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

HM 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: HM 698. A contin- 
uation of HM 698, Thesis I. 



Humanities 

HU 601-602 Themes in Western 
Thought and Culture: Greece, 
Rome 

Readings in primary sources of 
some of the classics in Western 
thought from Homer to the Ren- 
aissance. The place of these se- 
lected works in the development 
of Western ideas. 

HU 606 Humanism and Its 
Methodology 

A classic idea, work of art, mu- 
sical composition, work of litera- 
ture, historical event, and the vari- 
ety of the critical appraisals of it. 



HU 611 Historical Views and 
Views of History 

A survey of modern Western 
Historiography with particular at- 
tention to the methodology of re- 
cent and contemporary historians. 

HU 616 Art and Thought of the 
Renaissance 

A study of the achievements of 
some of the major figures of the 
Renaissance in art, music, philoso- 
phy, natural science, literature, 
drama. 

HU 621 The Age of the 
Enlightenment 

Philosophical background of the 
Age of Reason and its effects upon 
the art, music, and literature of the 
period. 

HU 626 The Age of Darwin 

Scientific thought of the period 
and its effect upon religious and 
philosophical ideas, upon art and 
literature, and upon the develop- 
ment of sociological thought. 

HU 631 Culture and Ethics in the 
Modem Age 

Popular attitudes and rational 
concepts that determine the struc- 
ture of contemporary America. 

HU 636 Philosophical Thought 

An examination of the changes 
in meaning and use of such endur- 
ing themes as certainty, existence, 
God, justice, knowledge, law, 
right, good. 

HU 638 Structuralism and 
Structural Linguistics 

An introduction to the basic 
principles of structuralism, with 
special emphasis given to ele- 
ments of language and linguistic 
theory. 

HU 641 Technology and Human 
Values 

The influence of applied science 
and technology on our concep- 
tions of ourselves, our society, and 
our environment. 



HU 646 The Social Sciences 
in Our Time 

How the social sciences are re- 
lated to the humanities, eshmates 
of the human condition in the light 
of developments in sociology, his- 
tory, political science, psychology 
and economics. 

HU 651-659 Topics in Humanities 

HU 661-669 Topics in History 

HU 671-679 Topics in Philosophy 

HU 681-689 Topics in the 
Natural, Physical and 
Social Sciences 

HU 691-695 Independent Study 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study or research under the 
supervision of a member of the 
faculty. 

HU 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis 
or portfolio. 

HU 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



International 
Business 

IB 643 International Business 

Prerequisites: EC 603, EC 604. 
An introduction to the political, 
economic, technological and cul- 
tural setting of internahonal busi- 
ness. Topics include the problems, 
policies and operational proce- 
dures of the multinational corpo- 
ration, including the adjustment 
to foreign cultures and govern- 
ments. The review of the develop- 
ment, organization and structure 
of the international firm will also 
be analyzed. 



IB 644 International Trade and 
Finance 

Prerequisites: IB 643, MK 609. 
Methods and procedures of fi- 
nancing imports and exports and 
documentation for import and ex- 
port marketing. An examination of 
commercial policy, international 
flows of funds, balance of pay- 
ments adjustments and exchange 
rates will be evaluated. The tech- 
niques of international financing 
within a context of foreign markets 
and currencies. 

IB 645 Comparative International 
Business Environments 

Prerequisites: IB 643, MK 609. A 
comparative approach to the study 
of non-economic aspects of foreign 
markets of several representative 
areas in the world. The focus is on 
the cultural, political, legal char- 
acterisHcs of foreign regions and 
their impact on the multinational 
firm. Major attention is given to 
the relationship of less developed 
countries and multinational corpo 
rations. 

IB 651 International Marketing 

Prerequisites: IB 643, MK 609. 
The application of marketing, 
principles, techniques in a global 
environment. A managerial ap- 
proach to international marketing 
as it pertains to product policies, 
market channels, pricing, adver- 
tising in a foreign market. Empha- 
sis is placed upon marketing in dif- 
ferent cultural settings. 

IB 652 Multinational Business 
Management 

Prerequisites: IB 643 and MK 
609. An examination of global 
strategy, production, planning, 
ownership control, organization 
and human resource management 
of the multinational corporation. 
The firm's international transac- 
tions, investments and risk factors 
will be analyzed. 



IB 670 Selected Issues 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 

IB 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
and permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the su- 
pervision of an advisor. 

IB 695 Independent Study I 

A planned progam of individ- 
ual study under the supervision 
of a member of the faculty. 

IB 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

IB 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sions of the individual student's 
progress in the prepararton of a 
thesis. 

IB 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Industrial 
Engineering 

IE 601 Introduction to Operations 
Research/Management Science 

Prerequisites: M 610 and IE 607 
or QA 604 or equivalent. Intro- 
duction to the techniques and phil- 
osophies of management science 
and operations research. Topics 
include linear programming, in- 
ventory analysis, queuing theory, 
dynamic programming, decision 
analysis and other management 
techniques. 



IE 602 Computing Fundamentals 

An introduction to computing, 
including consideration of basic 
concepts and technology, history 
of automatic computation, algo- 
rithms, and flowcharts, number 
systems, system organization, 
software systems, survey of pro- 
gramming languages and of spe- 
cial computer applicahons. 

IE 603C Introduction to Digital 
Computers: COBOL 

Recommended prerequisite: IE 
602 or equivalent. An introduction 
to the basic elements of computer 
science including computer hard- 
ware, software, information and 
data processing. Programming 
concepts are introduced using 
COBOL, a common business-ori- 
ented language. A student who 
has taken IE 603F will not be given 
credit for IE 603C. Laboratory fee 
required. 

IE 603F Introduction to Digital 
Computers: FORTRAN 

Recommended prerequisite: IE 
602 or equivalent. An introduction 
to the basic elements of computer 
science including computer hard- 
ware, software, information and 
data processing. Programming 
concepts are introduced using 
FORTRAN, a common language 
that is well-suited for scientific and 
technical work. A student who has 
taken IE 603C will not be given 
credit for IE 603F. Laboratory fee 
required. 

IE 604 Management Systems 

Techniques of industrial and 
governmental systems manage- 
ment including general systems 
and organizational theory. 



COURSES 



99 



IE 605 Advanced Business 
Programming 

Prerequisites: IE 603C or profi- 
ciency in language similar to 
COBOL. Advanced programming 
in COBOL or other business-ori- 
ented language within an applied 
business systems context. Labora- 
tory fee required. 

IE 606 Advanced Technical 
Programming 

Prerequisites: IE 603F or profi- 
ciency in a language similar to 
FORTRAN. Advanced program- 
ming in FORTRAN or other tech- 
nically-oriented language with 
emphasis on scientific and tech- 
nical applications. Laboratory fee 
required. 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

Prerequisite: M 610 or equiva- 
lent. Probability of events. Ran- 
dom variables and expectations; 
discrete and conhnuous distribu- 
tions; important standard distri- 
butions and applications; moment 
generating functions; central limit 
theorem. 

IE 608 Assembler Language 

Prerequisite: IE 603 or equiva- 
lent. Description of the general 
funchonal characterisKcs of a com- 
puter's main storage and periph- 
eral units. Interrupt philosophy 
and interrupt service routines. 
Discussion of the general philos- 
ophy of assembler instructions, 
code conversion of I/O to and from 
main memory and familiarization 
with appropriate reference manu- 
als. Micro instructions will be in- 
troduced to allow for wrihng and 
running of assembler programs. 
Macro instructions will be devel- 
oped to demonstrate techniques 
for reduced programming time. 
Laboratory fee required. 



IE 610 Computer Systems 
Selection 

Prerequisites: IE 605 or IE 606, IE 
614. Techniques for selecting, in- 
stalling, and operating computer 
systems and their peripheral 
equipment. Concepts of decisions 
with respect to compiler and hard- 
ware selection. Development of 
operating procedures, form de- 
sign, systems charting and docu- 
mentation. 

IE 611 Budgeting and Control 

Prerequisite: A 600. An analytic 
approach as applied to the princi- 
ples and policies of operational 
budgeting and control of expense 
and capital investments. Includes 
forecasting techniques, develop- 
ment of totally integrated systems 
with traditional financial state- 
ments and controls from top man- 
agement to first-line supervision. 

IE 612 Managerial Interactions I 

An interdisciplinary systems 
approach to human behavior in or- 
ganizations with emphasis on the 
impact of industrial engineering 
methods on organizational per- 
formance. The first course will 
deal with individual moHvation 
and face-to-face interaction in 
managerial roles; the second con- 
centrates on organizational devel- 
opment, job enrichment, and 
modern work attitudes. 

IE 613 Managerial Interactions II 

Prerequisite: IE 612. 



IE 614 Data Information Systems 

Prerequisites: IE 603 or equiva- 
lent, IE 604. Introduction to auto- 
mated information systems plan- 
ning and operations and their im- 
pact on management decision 
making, control functions and 
communication capabilities. An 
overview of concepts and proce- 
dures with applications in urban 
environments, large organizations 
and governmental agencies. Tech- 
niques presented include PERT/ 
CPM, Gantt charting, cost-benefit 
analysis. 

IE 615 Transportation and 
Distribution 

Prerequisite: IE 601. Introduc- 
tion to transportation science with 
emphasis on physical distribution 
problems. Survey of operations 
research models and optimization 
strategies and their roles in trans- 
portation systems management. 

IE 621 Linear Programming 

Prerequisites: M 610 or equiva- 
lent, IE 601 or equivalent. Thor- 
ough coverage of the techniques 
and applications of linear pro- 
gramming, a powerful operations 
research tool for optimal alloca- 
tion of limited resources in linear 
systems. 

IE 622 Queuing Theory 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607. Ele- 
ments of queuing theory including 
finite and infinite cases. Single 
server and multiple server parallel 
channels, series queues and spe- 
cial cases are analyzed. Experi- 
mental methods, including simu- 
lation, are presented in the context 
of industrial environments. 

IE 623 Decision Analysis 

Prerequisite: QA 605 or IE 607. 
Decision theory, game theory, and 
stochastic decision processes. 
Benefit-cost analyses under 
uncertainty. 



IE 624 Quality Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 607. Concepts of 
quality and statistical quality anal- 
ysis. Sampling techniques and de- 
cision processes. 

IE 643 Reliability and 
Maintainability 

Prerequisites: IE 602, IE 607 or 
QA 604. The basic theory and 
methodology of reliability and 
maintainability, including applica- 
tion of discrete and continuous 
distributions and stadsHcal de- 
signs. Reliability, estimation, 
structure models and growth 
models. 

IE 648 Data Structures 

Prerequisite: IE 603 or equiva- 
lent. An examination of data struc- 
tures and their associated comput- 
ing algorithms. Topics will include: 
arrays, linked lists, trees, stacks, 
queues, hashing techniques; algo- 
rithms such as sorting and search- 
ing, inserHon and deletion; anal- 
ysis of computational complex- 
ity. Some programming will be 
required; proficiency in a high- 
level programming language is 
required. 

IE 651 Human Engineering I 

A broad coverage of the physio- 
logical, psychological, and socio- 
logical aspects of man and the soci- 
ety in which he lives and works. 
Special topics include human fac- 
tors, motivation, group dynamics 
and ekistics. 

IE 652 Human Engineering II 

Prerequisite: IE 651. Continua- 
tion of Human Engineering I. 



IE 658 Data-Base Systems 

Prerequisite: IE 648. A survey of 
data-base (DB) systems, their pur- 
pose, structure, capabilities, uses. 
Topics will include: an overview of 
DB systems, their advantages and 
shortcomings; technical consider- 
ations, internal data storage meth- 
ods; DB languages, data definition 
and manipulation; privacy and se- 
curity in DB's; typical data-bases 
and their use. 

IE 670 Current Topics in 
Computer and Information 
Science 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 603, or 
permission of the instructor. An 
examination of new developments 
or current practices in computer 
and information science. A topic 
will be selected for thorough 
study; possible subject areas in- 
clude data structures, recent hard- 
ware or software advances, spe- 
cialized applications. Content may 
vary from trimester to trimester. 

IE 671 Current Topics in 
Operations Research 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607, IE 
621 or permission of the instructor. 
An examination of new develop- 
ments or current practices in oper- 
ations research. A topic will be se- 
lected for thorough study; possible 
subject areas include non-linear 
programming, network theory, 
scheduling techniques, special- 
ized techniques, specialized appli- 
cations. Content may vary from 
trimester to trimester. 

IE 672 Current Topics in 
Industrial Engineering 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. An exam- 
ination of new developments or 
current practices in industrial en- 
gineering. A topic will be selected 
for thorough study — possible sub- 
ject areas include reliability, pro- 
duction engineering, human fac- 
tors, specialized applicahons. 
Content may vary from trimester 
to trimester. 



IE 681 System Simulation 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or equiva- 
lent, IE 606 or equivalent. A study 
of the behavior of systems using 
computer simulation models of 
their organizational structure and 
decision criteria. Laboratory fee 
required. 

IE 682 Compiler Design 

Prerequisites: IE 605 or IE 606, 
and IE 608 or permission of the in- 
structor. Design and operation of 
assemblers and macroprocessors. 
Introduction to compiler design. 
Metalanguage. Lexical and syntac- 
tic analysis. Interpretive systems. 
Control of translation, loading and 
execution. Relocating loaders and 
overlay generation. Symbolic cod- 
ing systems. 

IE 683 Systems Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or QA 605, 
IE 614. Techniques and philos- 
phies defining the concept of 
systems analysis are presented in 
detail and illustrated with large 
scale case studies. Diverse systems 
are analyzed covering the social, 
urban, industrial and military 
spheres. Techniques presented 
include utility theory, decision 
analysis, and technological fore- 
casting. 

IE 684 Multiprogramming 
Systems 

Prerequisites: IE 605 or IE 606, 
and IE 608 or permission of the 
instructor. Topics in the areas of 
operating systems and computer 
architecture. Multiprogramming 
and multiprocessor systems. Dy- 
namic storage allocation and vir- 
tual memory systems. Time-shar- 
ing systems. On-line, real-time 
systems. 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 

Prerequisites; calculus, IE 603F 
or equivalent. Nonlinear and dy- 
namic programming with special 
reference to computer analysis of 
optimizahon problems. 



COURSES 



IE 686 Inventory Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607 or 
QA 605. Inventory theory and 
practical applications in operating 
inventory systems. Model con- 
struction, optimization and com- 
puter simulation. 

IE 688 Design of Experiments 

Prerequisite: IE 689 or three 
credit hours of statistical infer- 
ence. Principles of modern statis- 
tical experimentation and practice 
in use of basic designs for scientific 
and industrial experiments; single 
factor experiments, randomized 
blocks, laHn squares; factorial and 
fractional factorial experiments; 
surface fitting designs. 

IE 689 Descriptive and Inferential 
Statistics 

Prerequisite: IE 607 or equiva- 
lent. Inferential statistical designs, 
including basic statistical tests and 
analysis of variance. Statistical the- 
ories and application of correlahon 
analysis, multiple linear regres- 
sion, nonlinear regression, and 
analysis of covariance. 

IE 690 Seminar Project 

Prerequisites: 15 credit hours 
and permission of the program 
coordinator. Independent study 
under the guidance of an advisor 
into an area of mutual interest, 
such study terminating in a tech- 
nical report of academic merit. Re- 
search may constitute a survey of a 
technical area in industrial engi- 
neering, operations research or 
computer science, or may involve 
the solution of an actual or hypo- 
thetical technical problem. 

IE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
program coordinator. Independ- 
ent study under the guidance of an 
advisor into an area designated by 
the program coordinator. 



IE 696 Independent Study II 

A conhnuation of Independent 
Study I. 

IE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meeHngs and discussion 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

IE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Business Law 



LA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

LA 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study 1. 

LA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meehngs and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

LA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



LA 673 Business Law I: Contracts 

and Sales _ . . 

A study of the legal aspects of LOglStlCS 
contracts and the results of con- 
tractual obligations. Legal prob- 
lems stemming from the sale of 
goods, including the rights and 
duties of buyers and sellers and 
the remedies available to them. 



LA 674 Business Law II: Business 
Organizations and Negotiable 
Instruments 

Prerequisite: LA 673. Introduc- 
tion to problems of formahon and 
operation of legal groups with par- 
ticular emphasis on the law of 
agencies, partnerships and corpo- 
rations. Course coverage also will 
include the law of negotiable 
instruments. 

LA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

LA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the super- 
vision of an advisor. 



LG 660 Logistics Technology and 
Management 

Designed to provide to the stu- 
dent a broad survey of the wide 
range of logistics activities. Sub- 
jects covered: the concepts of the 
integrated logistics management 
system, customer interfaces, in- 
ventory management and support 
of spares and supplies, physical 
distribution management as well 
as the logistical organization, 
planning and administration. 
Discussion in the courses includes 
also the quantitative analytical 
techniques and computational 
tools commonly used in the logis- 
tical decision-making process. 

LG 663 Logistics Management in 
the System Acquisition Process 

Designed to provide students a 
general knowledge of the manage- 
ment process for the acquisition of 
equipment and material. Subject 
topics are: test and evaluations, 
specifications as a procurement in- 
strument, procurement methods, 
type of contracts, etc. 



LG 665 Integrated Logistics 
Support Analysis 

Designed to provide students an 
opportunity to understand the 
concept of Integrated Logistics 
Support (ILS), and an overview of 
each of the elements of logistics 
specialties, their interface and in- 
teraction, as well as the integrahon 
of the separate logistics special- 
ties into a coherent effort and out- 
put. Topics covered in this course 
are reliability, maintainability, life 
cycle cost, ILS management and 
major ILS decisions involved, test 
and support equipment, person- 
nel and training warranties, etc. 

LG 669 Life Cycle Cost Analysis 

A study of Life Cycle Cost Anal- 
ysis (LCCA), a new state-of-the-art 
management tool used in the de- 
fense industry to assist and advise 
decision-makers to identify a pre- 
ferred choice among all possible 
alternatives in acquisition of a new 
equipment and/or system. Topics 
discussed will be techniques and 
concepts such as the total cost con- 
cept (e.g., acquisition cost plus the 
cost of ownership including both 
the operating cost and the support 
cost); the fixed cost criterion (e.g., 
greatest effectiveness); the fixed 
effectiveness criterion (e.g., least 
cost) and the marginal utility crite- 
rion (e.g., least cost per unit of ef- 
fectiveness), etc. 

LG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

LG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the super- 
vision of an advisor. 



LG 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

LG 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study 1. 

LG 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

LG 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Mathematics 

M 610 Fundamentals of Calculus 
and Linear Algebra 

Prerequisite: M 115 or equiva- 
lent. Review of algebra. Topics 
from calculus, including differen- 
tiahon and integration methods, 
applied to problems in science, 
business, and the social sciences. 
Linear algebra, systems of linear 
equations and matrix methods. 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 

Prerequisite; 9 credit hours of 
calculus and programming ability 
in FORTRAN or permission of the 
instructor. Algorithms for obtain- 
ing numerical solutions on com- 
puters. Topics include: solution of 
determinants, solution of systems 
of linear equations by direct and 
iterative methods, numerical in- 
tegration, differentiation and so- 
lution of differential equations by 
finite difference methods. Labora- 
tory fee required. 



M 624 Applied Mathematics 

Topics in applied mathematics 
including power series solutions 
of ordinary differential equations, 
special functions, matrix theory, 
and integral transforms. 

M 632 Methods of Complex 
Analysis 

Prerequisite: graduate standing 
in engineering or mathematics. 
This course is a study of the appli- 
cations of the methods of complex 
variables to engineering and phys- 
ical sciences. Topics include ana- 
lyhc function theory, contour inte- 
gration and conformal mapping. 

M 670 Special Topics in 
Mathematics 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. A study of selected 
topics of particular interest to stu- 
dents and instructor. Course may 
be taken more than once. 

M 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the super- 
vision of an advisor. 

M 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of faculty. 

M 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

M 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

M 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



COURSES 



Mechanical 
Engineering 

ME 602 Mechanical Engineering 
Analysis I 

Prerequisite; M 624. Topics in 
complex variables, evaluation of 
integrals via residue theorem, spe- 
cial funchons, solution of partial 
differenhal equations by separa- 
tion of variables and integral trans- 
form methods. Green's function. 

ME 604 Mechanical Engineering 
Analysis II 

Prerequisite: Knowledge of 
FORTRAN. Review of matrix alge- 
bra and simultaneous equations. 
Numerical integration and differ- 
entiation, including techniques 
such as Euler, Runge-Kutta, 
Milne, shooting, Crank-Nicolson 
and FEM. Emphasis on numerical 
solutions to ordinary and partial 
differential equations relevant to 
Mechanical Engineering. 

ME 605 Finite Element Methods 
in Engineering 

Prerequisite: ME 604 or M 620. 
Basic concepts underlying the 
FEM. Displacement and Weighted 
Residual formulations of the fi- 
nite element approach to numeri- 
cal solutions. Applications to one- 
and two-dimensional problems in 
areas such as Elasticity, Heat 
Transfer and Fluid Mechanics. 

ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 

Kinematics and dynamics of 
single particles and systems of 
particles. Lagrange's equations. 
Hamilton's principles and canon- 
ical transformation theory. The in- 
ertia tensor and rigid body motion. 

ME 611 System Vibrations 

Advanced techniques for analy- 
sis of vibrations in mechanical sys- 
tems. Multiple degrees of free- 
dom, random noise inputs among 
topics. 



ME 615 Theory of Elasticity 

Index notation, Cartesian ten- 
sors and coordinate transforma- 
tion, stress tensor and field equa- 
tion, analysis of stress and strain in 
two and three dimensions. Airy 
stress function, applications to 
problems of torsion and bending, 
experimental methods. 

ME 620 Classical 
Thermodynamics 

Phenomenological equilibrium 
and nonequilibrium thermody- 
namics. Formulation and applica- 
tion of fundamental laws and con- 
cepts, chemical thermodynamics. 

ME 622 Statistical Mechanics 

Development of the molecular 
theory of matter; classical and 
quantum statistical results of equi- 
librium and kinetic properties of 
solids, liquids and gases. 

ME 625 Mechanics of Continua 

Prerequisite: ME 615 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Tensor anal- 
ysis, the stress vector and the 
stress tensor, kinematics of defor- 
mation, material derivative, fun- 
damental laws of continuum me- 
chanics, conservation theorems, 
constitutive laws, and representa- 
tive applicahons. 

ME 628 Modern Materials 

Survey of the forefront of current 
engineering materials and proc- 
essing techniques. Representative 
topics might include composites, 
superalloys, laser fabricahon and 
continuous casting techniques. 

ME 630 Advanced Fluid 
Mechanics 

Advanced topics chosen from 
among the following areas: perfect 
fluids, viscous fluids, turbulence, 
boundary layer theory, surface 
phenomena, shock waves, and 
gas dynamics. 



ME 632 Advanced Heat Transfer 

Review of the basic concepts of 
conduction and radiation. De- 
tailed treatment of laminar, turbu- 
lent, free and forced convectional 
flows. Computational projects. 

ME 645 Computational Fluid 
Dynamics and Heat Transfer 

Prerequisite: ME 630, and ME 
604 or M 620. Current methods of 
computer soluHons of the conser- 
vation equations of fluid dynam- 
ics. Viscous, incompressible, com- 
pressible and shock flows. Real 
gas equations of state. Computer 
projects. 

ME 670 Special Topics — 
Mechanical Engineering 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. A study of selected 
topics of particular interest to stu- 
dents and instructor. Course may 
be taken more than once. 

ME 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of pro- 
gram coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of an ad- 
visor into an area designated by 
the program coordinator. 

ME 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

ME 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

ME 699 Thesis II 

A continuaHon of Thesis I. 



Management 

MG 625 Systems Techniques in 
Business Administration 

An integrated study of the tech- 
niques for solving administrative 
problems, including the analysis 
and improvement of organiza- 
tional structures, office proce- 
dures, forms design, records man- 
agement, reports and equipment 
standards. The conduct of a com- 
prehensive systems survey using 
these techniques is explored in 
depth as are flow charting and the 
preparation of manuals. 

MG 635 Purchasing and 
Materials Management 

This course deals with the man- 
agement of materials and the pro- 
curement function in a business 
enterprise. The fundamentals aux- 
iliary functions, and management 
of materials activities provide in- 
troduction to an increasingly spe- 
cialized field of business admini- 
stration. 

MG 637 Management 

A study of the functions of man- 
agement planning, organizing, di- 
recting, controlling, coordinating. 

MG 638 Cost Benefit 
Management 

Prerequisites: QA 604, EC 603. 
This course will provide students 
with an introduction and overview 
to the field of cost/benefit manage- 
ment. Fundamental theoretical 
evaluation of cost/benefit of a pro- 
ject will be covered. Other topics 
discussed include: the selection of 
the best investment criteria, the 
external environmental spillover 
effects, and the application of 
cost/benefit management in deci- 
sion making under uncertainty. 



MG 640 Management of Health 
Care Organizations 

Identification of the characteris- 
tics of health care organizations 
and the dimensions of manage- 
ment in such organizations. Ex- 
amination and application of the 
principles of management neces- 
sary for the successful operations 
of health care organizations. 
M.B.A. students in the Health 
Care concentration take MG640 in 
place of MG637 in the core. 



MG 641 Contract Administration 

Prerequisite: QA 600 or equiva- 
lent. The administrative aspect of 
the contract, modification, evalua- 
tion, and sub-contracting. Impor- 
tance is given to value analysis as it 
effects government property and 
affects by action of the contractor 
and the government. Other issues 
are covered such as financial and 
pattern rights. 

MG 645 Management of Human 
Resources 

A study of organizational prac- 
tices in the management of human 
resources. Manpower planning, 
recruitment, selection, training, 
compensation and contemporary 
problems of the field. 

MG 650 Venture Management 

Prerequisites: A 621, Fl 615, MG 
637, MK 609, or permission of the 
instructor. Deals with the estab- 
lishment of a new business ven- 
ture, covering such topics as site 
development, market analysis, 
staffing, inventory control, per- 
sonnel relations and funding. 



MG 660 Comparative 
Management 

Prerequisite: MG 637, The main 
focus of this course is to develop 
an understanding of managerial 
practices in different organizations 
and systems. A conceptual frame- 
work is developed for the analysis 
of interaction between managerial 
processes and cultural factors as 
they affect the management of en- 
terprises in various organizations 
and systems. 

MG 661 Development of 
Management Thought 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Study of 
the literature from various disci- 
plines in order to determine the 
thinking and practices of leaders 
of organizations, past and pres- 
ent. The historical perspective of 
management thought will be de- 
veloped. The contributions of re- 
hgion, philosophy, economics, so- 
ciology and psychology to man- 
agement thought and practice will 
be examined. Emphasis on pio- 
neering works in the management 
of organizations. Case studies of 
the thinking and practices of fa- 
mous leaders of American busi- 
ness enterprises. 

MG 662 Organization Theory 

Prerequisite: MG 637. A survey 
of the hterature on theories of or- 
ganization with emphasis on con- 
temporary theories. Application of 
the theories to management and 
organizational problems will be at- 
tempted. Difficulties arising be- 
tween theory and practice will be 
examined. 



COURSES 



MG 663 Leadership in 
Organizations 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Examina- 
tion of theories and research find- 
ings from the behavioral sciences 
that are relevant to leadership in 
organizations. The role of the 
leader within the organization; the 
prerequisites, knowledge and 
practices required for successful 
leadership will be studied. Pro- 
grams for the development of 
leaders will be explored. 

MG 664 Organizational 
Effectiveness 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Identifi- 
cation of the criteria necessary for 
developing and maintaining effec- 
tive organizations. A study of the 
concepts that may be utilized in 
the management of these criteria. 
Approaches that may be examined 
and applied to problem situations 
through cases and role playing. 

MG 665 Compensation 
Administration 

Prerequisites: MG 645 and EC 
635. A study of the compensation 
function in organizations. Estab- 
lishing wages and salaries, fringe 
benefits and incentives. 

MG 669 Business Policy and 

Strategy 

Prerequisites: MG 637 and 3 
credit hours of 600-level MG 
course work. Management poli- 
cies and strategies for the complex 
organization operating in a dy- 
namic environment are examined 
from the viewpoint of the top-level 
executives of the organization. De- 
velops analytical frameworks for 
the management of numerous ele- 
ments involved in assuring the ful- 
fillment of the goals of the total 
organization. Integrates the stu- 
dent's general business knowl- 
edge with the required courses in 
the M.B.A. program. Emphasis is 
placed on the development of oral 
and written skills by the examina- 
tion and discussion of cases. 



MG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

MG 675 Readings in 
Management 

A seminar. Examines the litera- 
ture in selected areas of manage- 
ment. 

MG 678 Personnel Management 
Seminar 

Prerequisites: MG 637, MG 645, 
P 619 & EC 625. A seminar in the 
personnel and manpower man- 
agement function of the modern 
work organization. The use of an 
integrated behavioral, quantita- 
tive, and systems approach per- 
mits an applied multidisciplinary 
synthesis of the various aggregate 
manpower management subsy- 
stems required in the modern work 
organization. 

MG 679 Industrial Relations 
Seminar 

Prerequisites: MG 637, P 619, EC 
625 & EC 687. A seminar in indus- 
trial relations and the labor- 
management relations function of 
the modern work organization. 
The use of an integrated behav- 
ioral, economic, and legal ap- 
proach permits an applied 
multidisciplinary synthesis of the 
employee relations function re- 
quired in either non-unionized or 
unionized work organizations. 



MG 680 Current Topics in 
Business Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. An 
integrative course that will exam- 
ine the role of business in society 
and relate the business firm to its 
social, political, legal and eco- 
nomic environment. While the ex- 
act content of this seminar is ex- 
pected to vary from semester to 
semester in accordance with the 
varied academic interests and pro- 
fessional backgrounds of different 
faculty handling the course, the 
basic theme is the role of the busi- 
ness firm as the "keeper" of the 
market mechanism and the means 
for organizing resources in the 
economy. 

MG 685 Research Methods in 
Business Administration 

Prerequisite: QA 604 or equiva- 
lent. Designed to familiarize ad- 
ministrators of social research and 
to assist them in the presentation, 
interpretation and application of 
research data. 

MG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under the super- 
vision of an advisor. 

MG 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

MG 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

MG 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

MG 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Marketing 



MK 609 Marketing 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604. An 
intensive study of modern market- 
ing fundamentals, a study of the 
decision-making problems en- 
countered by the marketing execu- 
tive and the relation of marketing 
to environmental forces. 

MK 616 Buyer Behavior 

Prerequisite: MK 609. An exam- 
ination of the principal compre- 
hensive household and organiza- 
tional buyer behavior models and 
the behavioral science theories 
upon which such applied models 
are based . The buyer is analyzed at 
the individual level, at the social 
level and at the organizational 
level. 

MK 639 Marketing Research and 
Information Systems 

Prerequisites: MK 609, QA 605. 
A managerial approach to market- 
ing information flow, including 
recognition of information needs 
and an overview of marketing re- 
search as part of an information 
system. Special attention to evalu- 
ation of research design and meas- 
urement methods, effective utili- 
zation of research output, and 
problems encountered in estab- 
lishing a marketing information 
system. 

MK 641 Marketing Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The treat- 
ment of the basic decision prob- 
lems of marketing management in 
terms of a conceptual framework 
for analysis. Consideration of the 
role played by human judgments 
and the mathematical tools avail- 
able to aid in these judgements in a 
number of marketing areas, nota- 
bly market analysis, pricing deci- 
sions, advertising decisions, pro- 
motional decisions and selection 
of distribution channels. 



MK 643 Product Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The search 
for new product ideas and their 
evaluation; the organization struc- 
ture necessary to the development 
and introduction of new products 
and the management of a product 
line; the commercial aspects of 
product design, packaging, la- 
beling and branding; considera- 
tions involved in making product 
deletion decisions; and the social 
and economic effects of managing 
product innovation. 

MK 644 Consumerism 

Prerequisite: MK 609. An analy- 
sis of the evolution of the consum- 
erist movement; how and why it 
has developed; government 
agencies dealing with consumer 
problems; the impact of various 
market structures on the con- 
sumer; the impact of consumer- 
oriented legislation on marketing 
strategies; and the responsibility 
of business to the consumer and to 
society. 

MK 645 Distribution Strategy 

Prerequisite: MK 609. Analysis 
of channel strategies; theory and 
economic justificahon of distribu- 
tion channels; direct and indirect 
methods of control; behavioral 
states of channel members; costing 
the channel; and management of 
changes in distribution. 

MK 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
Hcular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 



MK 680 Marketing Workshop 

This course is centered around 
a structural model of a business 
firm. The major objective is to pro- 
vide the student with an opportu- 
nity to develop managerial in- 
sights and skills in dealing with 
marketing problems in a competi- 
tive environment. Each of the par- 
ticipants is grouped into decision- 
making units (companies) and 
assumes the role of a marketing ex- 
ecurive operating a business firm. 
These executives will be responsi- 
ble for planning, organizing, staff- 
ing, directing and controlling their 
firm's resources. 

MK 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
and permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the su- 
pervision of an advisor. 

MK 692 Readings in Marketing 

MK 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

MK 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study 1. 

MK 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

MK 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



COURSES 



Psychology 



P 605 Survey of Community 
Psychology 

An examination of historical 
roots and current concepts. A 
social-problems approach to psy- 
chological dysfunction. Changing 
professional roles. Community or- 
ganization and human service de- 
livery; strategies of intervention 
and community change. 

P 607 Special Problems in 
Community Psychology 

Theory and practice of com- 
munity psychology with selected 
problems, populations and set- 
tings. Emphasis on community 
psychology service issues and 
problems in the Connecticut area. 

P 609 Research Methods 

Prerequisite: Undergraduate 
course in statistical methods. In- 
troduction to analytic concepts 
pertinent to sampling techniques, 
research design, variable control 
and criterion definition. Basic 
problems of measurement, re- 
search paradigms, sources of error 
in research interpretation, prob- 
lems of variable identification and 
control, and consideration of the 
logic of inference. 

P 610 Program Evaluation 

Prerequisite; P 609. A systematic 
study of the processes involved in 
planning, implementing and eval- 
uating organizational programs. 
The focus is on action research 
strategies which integrate the en- 
tire process from planning to the 
evaluation of the program. 



Practicum Seminars 
and Field Work 

An apprenhceship or on-the-job 
role in an ongoing program or cen- 
ter. Emphasis on developing con- 
ceptualizations and insights as a 
result of involvement in the ap- 
prenticeship. Placement at a field 
site for 8 to 10 hours per week. 
Weekly class meetings serve two 
purposes; to present specific theo- 
retical material and research find- 
ings appropriate to each seminar 
and to allow students to discuss 
their field training experiences. 

P 611 Practicum Seminar I: 
The Dyadic Relationship 

Content focuses upon one-to- 
one relahonships in community 
psychology. See general descrip- 
tion above. 

P 612 Practicum Seminar II: 
Models of Consultation 

Content focuses upon commu- 
nity consultation. See general de- 
scription above. 

P 613 Practicum Seminar III: 
Systems Intervention 

Content focuses upon interven- 
tion into and change in commu- 
nity systems. See general descrip- 
tion above. 

P 614 Field Work I 

See general description above. 2 
credit hours. 

P 615 Field Work II 

See general description above. 2 
credit hours. 

P 616 Field Work III 

See general descriphon above. 2 
credit hours. 



P 618 Community Mental Health 
Philosophy and Concepts 

Considerations of the philo- 
sophical bases which underlie tra- 
ditional approaches to mental 
health. A study of the implied cul- 
tural values and attitudes which 
have determined the locations, 
the settings, the methods and the 
objectives of mental health treat- 
ment concepts, programs and 
techniques. 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 

Analysis of various theories of 
business and managerial behavior 
emphasizing the business organi- 
zation and its internal processes. 
Psychological factors in business 
and industry, including motiva- 
tion, incentives and conflict. A 
study of research findings rele- 
vant to an understanding and pre- 
diction of human behavior in 
organization. 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 

Psychological theories and re- 
search applied to business and 
other organizations. Problems 
and methods in selection and 
placement, training, performance 
appraisal, motivation and 
leadership. 

P 621 Behavior Modification 

Theory and research in behavior 
modification. Aversive learning, 
desensitization, operant condi- 
tioning. Applications in clinical 
and non-clinical settings. 

P 623 Psychology of the Small 
Group 

Analyses of the behavior and in- 
teraction of people in mutual grati- 
fication groups, committees, work 
groups and clubs. 



P 625 Developmental Psychology 

In-depth exploration of devel- 
opment through the life cycle and 
the developmental impact of fam- 
ily, neighborhood, schools, work, 
class, race, sex, etc.; key theoreti- 
cal concepts; research findings; 
community intervention. 

P 627 Attitude and Opinion 
Measurement 

Prerequisite: P609. Examination 
of modem methods of attitude 
and opinion measurement. Scale, 
schedule, and interview formats. 
Respondent sets. Consideration of 
sampling problems. 

P 628 The Interview 

The interview as a tool for in- 
formation gathering, diagnoses, 
mutual decision making and be- 
havior change. Use of role play- 
ing provides the student with 
insights into nuances of inter- 
personal relationships. Applica- 
tions to selection, counseling and 
other situations. 

P 629 Introduction to Counseling 

The roles of the client and the 
counselor in the counseling rela- 
tion. Examination of underlying 
assumptions. 

P 630 Psychology of Personality 

Major personality theories and 
their implications. Examination of 
the psychological and organic fac- 
tors involved in personality devel- 
opment and expression. 

P 631 Social Psychology 

Current problems in social psy- 
chology. Attitude scale construc- 
tion, attitude change, language as 
a social phenomenon, patterns of 
culture, social class, groups, per- 
son perception and conformity. 



P 632 Group Dynamics and 
Group Treatment 

An exploration of the emerg- 
ing area of group dynamics. The 
structure of groups, their develop- 
ment, process interaction analysis, 
formal and informal groups, 
group psychotherapy and sensi- 
tivity training. 

P 633 Problems of Drug Abuse 

Discussion of selected issues 
and current problems in drug 
abuse. 

P 634 Personality Assessment 

A critical survey of the theories 
and issues of personality assess- 
ment. Topics include intelligence, 
achievement and ability assess- 
ment. Personality tests and ethical 
questions associated with psycho- 
logical testing. 

P 635 Assessment of Human 
Performance with Standardized 
Tests 

Prerequisite; P 609. Theories, as- 
sumptions and constraints under- 
lying construction and application 
of standardized tests employed in 
clinical, educational, governmen- 
tal and industrial settings. Empha- 
sis on selection of appropriate 
standardized tests for specific 
applications. 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 

Etiological factors in psycho- 
pathology dynamics and classifi- 
cation of neuroses, psychophy- 
siologic conditions, psychoses, 
personality disorders, organic ill- 
ness, retardation and childhood 
diseases. 



P 638 Psychology of 
Communication and 
Opinion Change 

Characteristics of the source, the 
situation, and content of mes- 
sages, along with other variables 
influencing attitudinal modifica- 
tion. Cognitive factors and social 
setHngs in attitude change. 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and 
Morale 

Prerequisite: P 619. The mean- 
ing of work; theories of motiva- 
tion. Stimulus deprivation and ex- 
pectation of reinforcement; job 
satisfaction and motivation; pay 
as an incentive; interventions to 
increase work motivation. Case 
studies. 

P 641 Personnel Development 
and Training 

Prerequisite: P 619 or P 620. 
Identification of skills and devel- 
opmental needs, both from an 
organizational and individual per- 
specHve. Techniques for assess- 
ment and development of skills, 
especially at the managerial level. 
Training approaches. Evaluation 
of training efforts. 

P 642 Organizational Change 
and Development 

Prerequisite: P 619. The nature 
of organization development, in- 
tervention by third-party consul- 
tation, change in organization 
structure and role relationships, 
managerial grid, participation, 
conformity and deviation. 



COURSES 



P 645 Seminar in 

Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology 

Prerequisites: P 609 and P 619. 
An examination of the profes- 
sional psychologist at work in or- 
ganizations. Emphasis on meas- 
urement methods, prediction, 
validation, selection, training, and 
performance appraisal; practition- 
ers in business, industry, research 
organizations and government 
will provide insights into the ap- 
plication of psychological princi- 
ples and methods. 

P 650 Ecological Psychology 

An in-depth study of the rela- 
tionship between molar human 
behavior and the sociophysical 
settings in which it occurs. Human 
behaviors are conceptualized as 
adaptive responses to environ- 
mental and organizational sys- 
tems that provide their contexts. 
Particular emphasis will be placed 
on the ecological match between 
organizations and their members. 

P 660 Contemporary Issues in 

Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology 

Prerequisite: 12 hours in psy- 
chology or consent of the instruc- 
tor. In-depth invesHgation of topi- 
cal areas of concern in industrial/ 
organizational psychology. Topics 
may include, but are not limited 
to, the impact of EEOC regulations 
on selection and promotion; as- 
sessment centers; the role of the 
consultant in organizations; flex- 
time, day care, and other strate- 
gies to accommodate family needs 
of employees; stress in work set- 
tings; women in management. 
Content will be stated at the time 
the course is scheduled. Students 
may petition for a particular topic 
they feel would fit their academic 
goals. May be taken twice. 



P 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

P 672 Psychology of the Middle 
and Later Years 

A comprehensive consideration 
of the psychological aspects of 
the aging process. Sensation, per- 
ception, cognition, intelligence, 
problem solving, memory and sex- 
uality, personality changes. Dis- 
engagement, rigidity. Death and 
its anticipation. 

P 678 Practicum I 

For students already employed 
in a managerial or supervisory 
role. A job-related research project 
is carried out under faculty 
supervision. 

P 679 Practicum II 

Prerequisite: P 678. 

P 693 Organizational Internship I 

For students without experience 
at the managerial or supervisory 
level. Under faculty supervision, 
the student engages in field expe- 
rience in an industrial setting. 

P 694 Organizational Internship II 

Prerequisite: P 693. 

P 695 Individual Intensive 
Study I 

Prerequisite: completion of re- 
quired courses or 24 graduate 
hours and written approval of de- 
partment chairman. Provides the 
graduate student with the oppor- 
tunity to delve more deeply into a 
particular area of study under fac- 
ulty supervision. 

P 696 Individual Intensive 
Study II 

Prerequisite: P 695. 



P 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of all 
required courses or 24 graduate 
hours and written approval of 
department chairman. Periodic 
meetings and discussions of the 
individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

P 699 Thesis II 

Written approval of departmen- 
tal chairman. A continuation of 
Thesis 1. 



Public 
Administration 

PA 601 Principles of Public 
Administration 

The development, organization, 
functions and problems of na- 
tional, state and local governmen- 
tal administration. 

PA 602 Public Policy Formulation 
and Implementation 

The relationship between public 
administration and the formula- 
tion of public policy is studied. The 
implementation of public policy 
by administrators based on the 
politics of the administrator is ex- 
amined in terms of interaction be- 
tween various group representa- 
tives, i.e., the legislators, the 
politician, and pressure group 
leaders. 

PA 604 Communities and Social 
Change 

Interactions among the commu- 
nity as a social organization and 
education, police and welfare in- 
stitutions within it; special atten- 
tion to conceptual frameworks and 
current research or action pro- 
grams that particularly affect mi- 
nority groups. 



PA 611 Research Methods in 
Public Administration 

Designed to familiarize admin- 
istrators with the tools and poten- 
tialities of social research, and to 
assist them in the presentation, 
interpretation and application of 
research data. 

PA 620 Personnel Administration 
and Collective Bargaining in the 
Public Sector 

Study of the civil service sys- 
tems in the United States and the 
state governments, including a 
systematic review of the methods 
of recruitment, promotion, disci- 
pline, control and removal. Ex- 
plores the effects on work rela- 
tionships of collective bargaining 
statutes which have been adopted 
by legislatures. Emphasis is placed 
on collective bargaining case stud- 
ies from state and local govern- 
ments and hospitals. 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 
601. The problems faced by an ad- 
ministrator in dealing with inter- 
personal relationships and human 
processes. Analysis of individual 
and group behavior in various 
governmental and business set- 
tings to determine the administra- 
tive action for the promotion of 
desired work performance. Em- 
phasis given to the public sector. 
Participation in actual problem 
situation discussions and case 
studies. 

PA 630 Governmental Accounting 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 
601. The problems faced by a sur- 
vey of the essential principles of 
governmental accounting, budg- 
eting, cost accounting, and finan- 
cial reporting. The various oper- 
ating funds, bonded debt, fixed 
assets, investments, classification 
of revenue and expenditures, gen- 
eral property taxes and interfund 
relationships. 



PA 632 Public Finance and 
Budgeting 

Recommended prerequisites: 
PA 601, EC 608, PA 604. State and 
local expenditure patterns, state 
and local revenue sources, income 
taxation at the state and local level, 
excise taxation, sales taxation, tax- 
ation of capital and the property 
tax. Emphasis on fiscal and eco- 
nomic aspects of federalism and 
federal-state fiscal coordination. 
The role of the budget in the deter- 
mination of policy, in administra- 
tive integration, in control of gov- 
ernment operations. 

PA 634 Problems of Municipal 
Management 

Study of selected problems of 
city management with emphasis 
on "housekeeping" and line 
operations. 

PA 635 Statistics for Public 
Administrators 

Provides a basic theoretical 
treatment of the nature of statis- 
tical analysis and its role in eco- 
nomic research design and 
procedure. 

PA 641 Financial Management of 
Health Care Organizations 

Theory and application of finan- 
cial planning and management 
techniques in health care organiza- 
tions. Emphasis is on financial de- 
cision making, preparation of 
short-term and long-term cash, 
capital, and revenue and expense 
budgets and financial plans to 
meet the requirements of HCFA 
and other third parties. 

PA 642 Health Care Delivery 
Systems 

This course deals with a con- 
temporary analysis of health care 
delivery systems in the U.S. Finan- 
cial, cost, economic, political and 
organizational issues will be 
discussed. 



PA 643 Health and Institutional 
Planning 

Designed to develop skills and 
understanding of the dynamics of 
health and social planning proc- 
esses with respect to consumer de- 
mand, national and local health 
goals and the optional location of 
facilities, services and manpower. 

PA 644 Administration of 
Programs and Services for the 
Aged 

The structure, function and 
properties of publicly and pri- 
vately funded programs and serv- 
ice organizations providing health 
services to the aged. The eco- 
nomic, political, legal and social 
issues which affect the administra- 
tion of human service organiza- 
tions will be studies, with 
emphasis on administration of 
health care services. 

PA 645 Health Care Economics 
and Finance 

Recommended prerequisite: PA 
641. This course integrates the ac- 
counting, economics, finance, 
budgehng, and heath insurance 
principles, concepts and analytical 
tools which are essential to the de- 
cision-making processes of health 
care organizations. 

PA 650 Administrative Law 

A search for principles and cri- 
teria against which public interest 
can be balanced with private right 
in the changing patterns of gov- 
ernment, with particular reference 
to the American system. 



COURSES 



PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory 
and Practice 

Explores the concept of physical 
planning within the urban devel- 
opmental framework. The func- 
tion of planning in its relationship 
to the environment. Comprehen- 
sive planning with its many ramifi- 
cations involving the various sec- 
tions of our society. Methods for 
analyzing problems as well as de- 
sign methods for problem solving. 

PA 661 Problems of Metropolitan 
Areas 

Analysis of the problems of 
government and administration 
arising from the population pat- 
terns and physical and social struc- 
tures of contemporary metropoli- 
tan communities. 

PA 663 Urban Housing 

Encompassed are the subjects of 
housing management, planning, 
finance and policy. Specific topics 
such as the provision of low- 
income housing, the use of mort- 
gage insurance, interest subsidies, 
site planning, rent controls, code 
enforcement, mortgage markets, 
and the rise of housing abandon- 
ment are stressed. 

PA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

PA 671 Administrative Problems 

Exploration of the practical ex- 
periences and problem-solving sit- 
uafions in the day-to-day acfivities 
of a public administrator. 

PA 680 Seminar in Public 
Administration 

Exact material to be covered will 
be announced. 



PA 690 Research Seminar 

A core course required of all stu- 
dents. Students will undertake a 
major independent research study 
and participate in an integrative 
seminar on research and its uses in 
public administration. 

PA 691 Research Project 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate 
hours, permission of the public 
administrafion graduate program 
coordinator. Independent study 
for advanced graduate students on 
selected problems in public ad- 
ministration. May be taken more 
than once. 

PA 692 Readings in Public 
Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. 

PA 693 Public Administration 
Internship 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate 
hours, permission of the public 
administrafion graduate program 
coordinator. A supervised work 
experience in a cooperafing public 
service agency. Students must be 
available for at least one day per 
week. 

PA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

PA 696 Independent Study II 

A confinuation of Independent 
Study I. 

PA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meefings and discussion 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

PA 699 Thesis II 

A confinuahon of Thesis I. 



Physics 

PH 680 Special Topics— Physics 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. A study of selected top- 
ics of particular interest to stu- 
dents and instructor. Course may 
be taken more than once. 



Philosophy 

PL 601 Business Ethics 

Problems considered include 
the nature of the corporafion, the 
values of business acfivity, cor- 
porate social responsibility, the 
proper relationship between the 
corporation and government, em- 
ployee rights, and related matters. 
Problems are analyzed using the 
most important current theories of 
social and economic jusfice. 



Political Science 

PS 601 Constitutional Law 

A study of the relafion of the 
judicial process and consfitufional 
law to the political process in the 
United States. Judicial review, fed- 
eralism and separafion of powers. 

PS 602 Civil Liberties and Rights 

An analysis of civil liberfies, civU 
rights, due process, and equal pro- 
tecfion of the law. An examination 
of the role of the public official in 
the protecfion, denial or abridge- 
ment of the consfitufional and le- 
gal rights of individuals. 



PS 603 International Law 

A study of the role of interna- 
tional law in the modern state sys- 
tem with particular reference to in- 
dividuals; territorial jurisdiction; 
law of the sea, air and space; and 
the development of law through 
international organizations. 

PS 604 Human Rights and the 
Law 

An examination of the develop- 
ment of the international and na- 
tional laws establishing human 
rights, the laws of war, war/crim- 
inality, crimes against humanity, 
and the application of the univer- 
sal declaration of human rights of 
the Helsinki accords, and the con- 
cept of the individual as the basis 
of law. 

PS 605 Criminal Law 

Scope, purpose, definition and 
classification of criminal law. Of- 
fense against the person; habi- 
tation and occupancy. Offenses 
against property and other of- 
fenses. Special defenses. Empha- 
sis on the Connecticut penal code. 

PS 608 The Legislative Process 

An analysis of the legislative 
process in the American political 
system. Stress will be placed on 
legislative polihcs in state and local 
government. Among areas cov- 
ered will be legislative functions, 
selection and recruitment of legis- 
lative candidates, legislative role 
orientations, the legislative social- 
ization process, the committee 
system, the legislators and their 
constituencies, legislative lobby- 
ists, legislative decision making, 
legislative-executive relations and 
legislative organization and 
procedures. 

PS 610 Legal Methods I 

A study of procedure and proc- 
ess of the law as it applies in the 
American system. 



PS 612 Contracts, Torts and the 
Practice of Law 

An introduction to the most im- 
portant components of private 
law, that is, contracts, torts and 
civil procedure and their applica- 
tion to business, government and 
individuals. 

PS 613 Political Justice 

This course will explore the re- 
lationship between legal issues 
and the political environment in 
history, including an examination 
of notable political trials, legisla- 
tive investigations and regulatory 
decisions. 

PS 615 Jurisprudence 

The purpose of this course is to 
provide the general philosophical 
framework for all the law courses 
in the legal studies program. The 
course will include the back- 
ground and development of the 
common law, sources of the law, 
and the court system. Special 
problems in Anglo-American ju- 
risprudence are reviewed. 

PS 616 Urban Government 

An examination of the urban po- 
litical system. Stress will be placed 
on the political aspects of urban 
government structures. Among 
the areas covered will be formal 
and informal decision making in 
urban government, community 
power structures, types of urban 
government structures, the poli- 
tics of inter-governmental rela- 
tions and the politics of servicing 
the urban environment (social 
services, planning agencies, edu- 
cation, housing, transportation, 
health, pollution control and ecol- 
ogy, revenue sharing, public 
safety, neighborhood corpora- 
tions, etc.). 



PS 617 Law, Science and Ethics 

The intersection of law, science 
and ethics in a variety of contexts, 
including experimentation with 
human subjects, psycho-surgery, 
genetic engineering, organ trans- 
plants, abortion and the right to 
die. 

PS 625 Transnational Legal 
Structure 

An introduction to the basic 
structure of legal systems in other 
countries, their relationship to 
Anglo-American law and their 
contextual development. Special 
topics include: legal status of for- 
eign and multinational corpora- 
tions, rights and responsibilities of 
aliens, protections for investors, 
expropriation and procedural due 
process. 

PS 626 Decision Making in the 
Political Process 

An in-depth study of decision 
making in the American system 
with special emphasis upon the 
various types of mechanisms, i.e., 
executive, legislative, judicial, bu- 
reaucratic, organizational and mil- 
itary. The influence of intelligence, 
economic and psychological fac- 
tors and social pressures upon de- 
cisions and decision makers will be 
examined. 

PS 628 Change and Government 

A study of the major processes 
of change and their consequences 
for the functioning of government. 
The course will concentrate upon 
changes that may occur through 
violence, evolution or technology, 
and which may alter the effective 
operation of government. 



COURSES 



PS 633 The Political Process and 
the Aged 

A study of the political process 
as it relates to the aged. Govern- 
mental decision making on fed- 
eral, state and local levels includ- 
ing legislation and its implications. 

PS 635 Law and Public Health 

A course for the civil servant 
or health professional concerned 
with the laws relating to the public 
health at the federal, state and lo- 
cal level as well as the practical ad- 
ministrahon of those laws. 

PS 641 The Politics of the World 
Economy 

An examination of the global 
politico-economic system and the 
challenges facing world diplo- 
macy. Multinational corporations 
and political structures designed 
to coordinate global policies for the 
monetary and trade systems, in- 
ternational organizations and their 
impact on third world develop- 
ment, and problems facing indus- 
trialized nations will be analyzed. 

PS 645 Government and the 
Industrial Sector 

This course examines the vari- 
ous impacts of government regu- 
lation on the corporate sector and 
the major legal and regulatory re- 
quirements affecting business and 
industry. 

PS 652 Legal Administration 

Examination of the structure 
and process of legal administra- 
tion in the United States and the 
types of issues arising within it. It 
includes a discussion of the rela- 
tionship among social, economic 
and political factors and their ef- 
fects on administration of law and 
public policy in contemporary is- 
sue areas. 



PS 655 Conflict Resolution 

A course covering the essential 
features and methods available 
within the legal system to resolve 
disputes, including the uses of 
law, equity, administrative agen- 
cies, bureaucracies, arbitration, 
mediation, special commission 
and private self-help. Considera- 
tion will be given to the applicabil- 
ity of those methods to various 
types of disputes and will touch 
upon the choice of law in instances 
when no single rule may govern in 
a federal system. 

PS 670 Special Topics 

Items of special interest might 
include: First Amendment prob- 
lems, energy and the law, law and 
the environment, labor legislation 
and the law, law and commercial 
paper and stock issues. May be 
taken more than once. 

PS 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

PS 696 Independent Study II 

A conrinuation of Independent 
Study I. 

PS 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussion 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

PS 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Quantitative 
Analysis 

QA 600 Quantitative Analysis 

Basic mathematics for solving 
economic and business prob- 
lems. Topics include algebra re- 
view, equations and inequalities, 
graphs, exponential and logarith- 
mic functions, an introduchon to 
matrix algebra. No credit. 

QA 604 Probability and Statistics 

Prerequisite: QA 600 or equiva- 
lent. An introduction to business 
statistics. Topics include data anal- 
ysis and presentation, frequency 
distributions, probability theory, 
probability distributions, decision 
making under uncertainty, sam- 
pling and statistical inference, hy- 
pothesis testing, t, chi-square, and 
F tests. 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 

Prerequisite: "B" or better grade 
for QA 604 or equivalent. A contin- 
uation of QA 604. Topics include 
simple regression and correlation, 
multiple regression, analysis of 
variance, the general linear model 
and an introduction to time se- 
ries analysis and forecasting tech- 
niques. 



QA 606 Advanced Management 
Science 

Prerequisites: IE 601, QA 604- 
605. An examination, from a man- 
agement viewpoint, of the scope 
of applicability of the methods and 
models developed in IE 601, Intro- 
duction to Operations Research/ 
Management Science, and QA 
604-605, Probability and Statistics, 
and Advanced Statistics. Topics 
include parametric programming 
and economic interpretation of the 
dual LP problem, marginal costs 
and revenues, shadow prices, op- 
portunity costs, incremental costs, 
costs of deviation from optimal so- 
lution point(s), and location or 
construction of desirable alternate 
optimal solutions. 

QA 607 Forecasting 

Prerequisite: QA 605 or per- 
mission of the instructor. This 
course will present a wide range of 
forecasting methods useful to stu- 
dents and practitioners of manage- 
ment, economics and other disci- 
plines requiring forecasting. The 
course will focus on quantitative 
techniques of forecasting and will 
include: smoothing and decompo- 
sition approaches, multiple re- 
gression and econometric models, 
and autoregressive/moving aver- 
age methods including general- 
ized adaptive filtering and Box- 
Jenkins methodology. 

QA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. Course includes ap- 
plied regression analysis, analysis 
of variance, factor analysis, mul- 
tivariate analysis, nonparametric 
statistics and simulation. May be 
taken more than once. 



QA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. In- 
dependent study under supervi- 
sion of an advisor. 

QA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

QA 696 Independent Study II 

Prerequisite: QA 695. 

QA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

QA 699 Thesis II 

Prerequisite: QA 698. A contin- 
uation of QA 698, Thesis I. 



Science 

SC 601 Introduction to Ecology 

An introduction to the biologi- 
cal aspects of environmental prob- 
lems. Includes discussion of the 
concepts of bioecology, organisms 
(microorganisms, plants, animals) 
important in pollution control and 
detecHon, and human organ sys- 
tems most affected by pollution. 

SC 602 Pollutants and the Aquatic 
Environment 

Prerequisite: SC 601. Discusses 
the interralationships among the 
various kinds of pollutants, the 
morphology of the lake, river, or 
coastal area, and the effects on 
the individual organism and the 
ecosystem as a whole. Treatment 
methods using organisms are also 
discussed. 



SC 603 Air Pollution 

Prerequisite: SC 601. An intro- 
duction to air movements in the 
atmosphere and their relation to 
pollutants; the effect of air pollu- 
tion upon organisms with special 
emphasis on the effects on human 
beings. 

SC 608 Water Quality 

Prerequisite: SC 601 or under- 
graduate biology major. Recogni- 
tion of the organisms and sub- 
stances of polluted waters; the 
selection of the appropriate meth- 
ods for collection, testing, and 
analysis of the data. The functions 
and interrelahons of governmen- 
tal agencies in controlling water 
pollution. 

SC 610 General Environmental 
Health 

Prerequisite: SC 601 or under- 
graduate biology major. Princi- 
ples of public health with general 
emphasis given to environmental 
factors such as air and water 
pollutants, legal standards and 
preventative measures and their 
relationships to public health. 

SC 612 Freshwater Ecology 

Prerequisite: SC 601 or under- 
graduate bioecology course. In- 
vestigation of physical, chemical, 
and biological relationships in 
lakes, ponds, and rivers. Empha- 
sis on factors relating to 
eutrophicahon problems and the 
manner in which ecological stud- 
ies are conducted. 

SC 613 Marine Ecology 

Prerequisite: SC 601 or under- 
graduate bioecology course. In- 
vestigation of physical, chemical 
and biological relationships in 
oceans, coastal waters, and estuar- 
ies. Emphasis on factors and en- 
vironments encountered in pollu- 
tion problems and the manner in 
which ecological studies are 
conducted. 



COURSES 



115 



SC 615 Life Cycle Nutrition 

Prerequisites: Introductory Nu- 
trition, Introductory Biology, In- 
troductory Chemisty, or by special 
permission. A review of the struc- 
tures, properties, sources and ac- 
tions of the major nutrients. 
Discussion of the relationships of 
the nutrients to various physiolog- 
ical processes. Emphasis on nutri- 
tional needs during the various 
stages of life. Therapeutic nutri- 
tional applications presented 
where applicable. 

SC 616 Geriatric and Advanced 
Nutrition 

Prerequisites: SC 615 or strong 
background in nutrition. Latest 
concepts of nutrition discussed. 
Reports from current journals pre- 
sented. Special emphasis given to 
nutritional problems of the aged. 
Preventative and therapeutic nu- 
trition covered. 

SC 621 Microbiology 

Prerequisites: SC 301, or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Use of cur- 
rent literature to view the bene- 
ficial and deleterious impacts of 
microorganisms, from viruses to 
fungi, on the environment. Topics 
will be diversified and dependent 
upon student preference. 

SC 622 Bacteriology 

Prerequisites: SC 301, SC 302, or 
permission of the instructor. 
Study of the characteristics basic to 
classification of bacteria. Group- 
by-group study of bacteria with 
emphasis on the major detrimen- 
tal and beneficial contributions of 
each group as they affect man and 
the environment. Students will be 
expected to survey recent findings 
in scientific publications. 



SC 642 Physical Aging 

Prerequisite: SC 121 or some un- 
dergraduate biology. A study of 
the aging process in man and its 
effects on the various component 
systems of the body — muscular, 
skeletal, endocrine, etc. — in 
health and disease. 

SC 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: 9 graduate hours. 
A study of selected issues of partic- 
ular interest to the students and in- 
structor. May be taken more than 
once. 

SC 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. Independent study un- 
der the supervision of an advisor. 

SC 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

SC 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

SC 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

SC 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Occupational Safety 
and Health 
Management 

SH 602 Safety Organization and 
Administration 

Intensive study of the occupa- 
tional safety and health field as 
it currently exists. History and 
growth of industrial safety. Moti- 
vational and psychological aspects 
of accident prevention. Legal as- 
pects of safety, including worker 
compensation and state and fed- 
eral regulations. Engineering 
needs. Development of voluntary 
standard systems. Fire preven- 
tion, industrial hygiene and future 
directions. 

SH 605 Industrial Safety 
Engineering 

An analysis of the major phys- 
ical hazards in industrial work and 
the attendant safety practices em- 
ployed to eliminate the hazardous 
condition or minimize the likeli- 
hood and extent of injury. This in- 
cludes the hazards associated with 
machinery, combustion, electric- 
ity, material handling and fire. 

SH 608 Industrial Hygiene 
Practices 

Recognition of the magnitude 
and extent of the health hazards 
characteristic of industrial work. 
An evaluation of the danger, the 
control of the hazard, and the pro- 
tection of the worker. 



SH 611 OSH Seminar 

The students and OSH faculty 
will meet once a week for 1-hour 
throughout the trimester. The stu- 
dent will pick a topic from the cur- 
rent occupational health and 
safety problems, conduct litera- 
ture search and prepare a formal 
talk for 45 minutes with 
audiovisuals, etc. The student will 
then present it on assigned date 
for 45 minutes and will answer any 
questions for the remaining 15 mi- 
nutes either from faculty or stu- 
dents. 1 credit hour. 

SH 615 Industrial Toxicology 

Introduction to environmental 
and industrial toxicology; toxico- 
logic evaluation; the mode of en- 
try, absorption and distribution of 
toxicants; the metabolism and ex- 
cretion of toxic substances; in- 
teractions between substances in 
toxicology; toxicologic data ex- 
trapolation; particulates; solvents 
and metals; agricultural chemi- 
cals — insecticides and peshcides; 
toxicology of plashes; gases; food 
additives; plant and animal toxins; 
carcinogens, mutagens and 
teratogens. 

SH 620 Occupational Safety and 
Health Law 

A survey of the major federal 
Occupational Safety and Health 
laws with an emphasis on the Oc- 
cupational Safety and Health Act 
of 1970 (Public Law No. 91-956) as 
well as state and federal work- 
man's compensation law. Studies 
will focus on the AdministraHon of 
the laws, their major provisions, 
the enforcement process as well as 
the federal/state interrelationships 
in this milieu. 2 credit hours. 



SH 630 Product Safety and 
Liability 

An investigation into the legal 
pitfalls and the human concerns 
inherent in the marketing and con- 
sumption of goods: sellers respon- 
sibility, product liability, insur- 
ance, labeling requirements. The 
Consumer Product Safety Act and 
related acts, the procedures for 
minimizing legal risk and maxi- 
mizing human safety and health. 

SH 660 Industrial Ventilation 

A thorough study of industrial 
ventilation systems including the- 
ory of design, air pollution control, 
life cycle costs, automatic controls, 
instrumentation, relevant codes 
and standards, and the evaluation 
of system performance. 

SH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
ticular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

SH 690 Research Project I 

Prerequisite: permission of the 
instructor. Independent study un- 
der the supervision of an advisor. 
1-3 credits. 

SH 691 Research Project II 

Prerequisite: SH 690. 1-3 credits. 

SH 693 OSH Internship I 

This will be coordinated with 
the local industry or governmental 
agencies such as OSHA, NIOSH 
and EPA. It involves practical 
problems in occupational safety or 
industrial hygiene and step by 
step approach on how to solve 
these problems under the supervi- 
sion of a practicing professional. 
At the end of the project a report 
will be prepared by the student 
and be presented to the OSH fac- 
ulty for grade evaluation. 1-3 
credits. 



SH 694 Internship II 

A continuation of Internship I. 
1-3 credits. 

SH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 1-3 
credits. 

SH 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 1-3 credits. 

SH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussion 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

SH 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Sociology 



SO 601 Minority Group Relations 

An interdisciplinary survey of 
minority groups in the United 
States with special reference to 
ethnic, religious and racial factors 
that influence interaction. 

SO 610 Urban Sociology 

Prerequisite: PA 604. The prob- 
lem of urban growth and de- 
velopment. Residential patterns 
together with the physical devel- 
opment of cities and the redevel- 
opment plans. An examination of 
the people and their relationships 
to the environment. 



COURSES 



so 620 Sociology of Bureaucracy 

A study of some of the classic 
conceptualizations of bureaucracy 
and their relevance to the structure 
and functioning of American eco- 
nomic and governmental institu- 
tions. The course will be designed 
to give students informational and 
experiential resources with which 
they, as planners and managers, 
can improve their abilities to make 
effective policy decisions. Strongly 
recommended for gerontology 
students. 

SO 641 Death and Suicide 

In-depth analysis of suicide. 
Traditional theories of suicide are 
analyzed regarding the psycho- 
logical approach as well as the de- 
mographic and group analysis of 
sociology. The goal of the course is 
both academic and practical, 
stressing community application. 
Strongly recommended for geron- 
tology students. 

SO 649 Seminar in Health and 
Social Policy 

Prerequisite: consent of instruc- 
tor. Analysis of the legal, politi- 
cal, social, economic and organ- 
izational factors in planning and 
providing health care services 
with emphasis on policy formu- 
lation and implementation. Cur- 
rent health policy issues will be 
discussed. 

SO 651 Social Gerontology 

Basic introduction to the field of 
gerontology. Discusses the history 
and definition of the field, the con- 
tributions of academic disciplines 
to the field, various perceptions of 
aging, and explores the basic the- 
ories, problems and prospects of 
gerontology. Required of all ger- 
ontology students. 



SO 652 Seminar in Gerontology 

The seminar will focus on a topic 
or a series of topics crucial to the 
analysis of the gerontological phe- 
nomenon, and will explore inter- 
disciplinary techniques and find- 
ings. Required of all gerontology 
students. 

SO 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of par- 
Hcular interest to the students and 
instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 

SO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision of 
a member of the faculty. 

SO 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study 1. 

SO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussion 
of the individual student's prog- 
ress in the preparation of a thesis. 

SO 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Social Welfare 

SW 651 Social Work with the 
Elderly I: Individuals, Families, 
Groups 

This course will deal with the 
problems of aging, focusing par- 
ticularly on the individual and the 
immediate family. Emphasis wUl 
be placed on the role of social work 
in helping the individual and the 
family to deal with issues of dis- 
crimination, medical and psycho- 
logical problems, parent-child 
conflicts, death and dying. 



SW 652 Human Services and the 
Elderly II: Programs, Planning, 
Policies 

An introduction to the variety of 
private and public social service 
programs available to the elderly. 
An attempt will be made to iden- 
tify gaps and propose alternatives 
for future programming. 



STUDENT SERVICES 



Alumni Office 



Membership in the Alumni Association is acquired immediately 
upon graduation. Including the class of 1982 there are more than 14,000 
members of the Alumni AssociaHon. The alumni director, with the 
assistance of the Alumni Association president, conducts the affairs of 
the association during the period between meetings which occur four 
times per year. 

As a member of the Alumni Association, graduates receive an alumni 
card which enables them to use the university library, gymnasium 
facilities and the services of the Career Development Office. The card 
also allows admission to UNH home athletic events. Insight, an all- 
college publication, is mailed to all alumni four times per year. 
Homecoming, an annual event in the fall, and other educational and 
social events are open to all alumni. Alumni volunteers play an 
important role in the annual giving campaign. 

The Alumni Association is represented on the Board of Governors by 
a member who is elected for a term of two years. The president of the 
association serves on the Board of Governors as an ex-officio member. 

Members of the Alumni Executive Board are elected for two-year 
terms. The Alumni CouncD numbers approximately 30 people, and is 
an advisory board to the university on alumni relations. Its primary 
objectives are to strengthen alumni relations and promote 
communication between the alumni and the university as a whole. 



Athletics 



Graduate students are encouraged to make use of the North Campus 
athletic complex. Facilities include three basketball courts, handball- 
paddleball court, weight room with universal gym, a multipurpose 
exercise room, steam room, fully equipped training room, six tennis 
courts, two Softball fields, baseball diamond and combination football- 
soccer-lacrosse field. 

Graduate students are eligible to take part in the intramural 
competition in touch football, badminton, bowling, three- and five- 
player basketball, paddleball, Softball, tennis, floor hockey and 
volleyball. 



Campus Store 



The Campus Store provides all necessary texts, new and used, that 
are required for courses at the university. It also carries related 
supplies, greeting cards, imprinted clothing, gifts, candy and a 
selection of paperbacks, newspapers and periodicals. The Campus 
Store buys back used texts on a daily basis throughout the year. It also 
orders class rings and handles film processing for the campus 
community. 

Special arrangements are made for students taking courses at off- 
campus locations to purchase required books at or near off-campus 
centers. 



Career Development 
and Off-Campus 
Employment Office 



The Career Development Office offers individual counseling; special 
workshops on resume preparation, interviewing skills and job research 
techniques; as well as a monthly professional career testing service. 
Many employers conduct job interviews at the Career Development 
Office throughout the year, and a schedule is printed in the alumni 
publication. Insight. 



Computer Center 



The university Computer Center provides a state-of-the-art facility 
to both academic and administrative functions at the university. It 
maintains three independent processing units, each accessible from 
any given terminal via a network processor capable of polling for ports, 
both direct-connect or dial-up. 

Further, three of the CPU's are networked together via XODIAC (a 
Data General network support system). The center also supports six 
micro-computers: 1) three Radio Shack TRS-80's, two Apple II's (one 
with a graphics tablet), and Atari 800. 

The administrative computer is the Data General MV/8000 — Eclipse 
line. It is a 32-bit processor with 3 megabytes of physical memory and a 
virtual address range of 4 gigabytes. The operating system is AOS/VS 
and is capable of handling up to 255 concurrent processes. All data 
entry is made via VDT's (video display terminals); the maximum 
number of ports that can be attached to the processor is 128. Presently, 
32 ports have been installed. Other peripherals are 2 disk drives (one 
147-megabyte and one 600-megabyte with dual porting capabilities), 1 
dual density magnetic tape drive and one 600-line-per-minute printer. 
In addition to the typical administrative functions, word processing is 
also supported. 

The academic facility's primary computers are the Data General 
MV/8000 and the S/140. Both are the Eclipse line. The MV/8000 is a 
32-bit processor with 10 megabytes of physical main memory and a 
virtual address range of 4 gigabytes. The CPU runs at 1.1 million 
instructions per second. The system has floating point hardware and 
functions in a multiprogramming/multitasking environment. The 
operating system is AOS/VS and is capable of handling 255 concurrent 
processes. Peripherals attached to the system are 4 disk drives (three 
277-megabytes and one 147-megabytes), one 800/1600 bpi tape drive, 
one 600-line-per-minute printer, three 340-character-per-seGond 
printers, and one 180-character-per-second Decwriter printer. Several 
more printers can be attached if desired. 

The system can support up to 128 terminals, and presently is 
uttlizing 75 VDT's. Ten dial-up lines are available for portable terminal 
use. A full screen editor dramahcally enhances program generahon 
and, hence, throughput. All programming is interactive via the VDT's. 
Programs can be submitted to a batch stream if desired. This allows for 
continued use of terminals for other tasks or termination of session 
while the submitted job runs to completion. 

Communications capabilities are superb in that networking 
(including such protocols as SNA, X.25, etc.) is or can be readily made 
available to the users. 



Student Services 121 

Software support includes ANSI languages such as FORTRAN 77, 
COBOL, PL/1 RPG-II, BASIC (Extended), PASCAL and APL. A 
data-base file manager (INFOS), a SORT/MERGE package, a 
mathematical/statistical package (IMSL) are already available for users. 
The social science package, SPSS — Version 9.0, is up and running. 
Many other popular software packages will be made available as time 
allows or need dictates. Graphics packages and raster graphics 
terminals have been introduced into the computing curricula. Several 
RJE emulators are supported on the MV/8000, including RJE-80 
(2780/3780) and HASP II. Word processing is also up and running. 

The Data General S/140 is used to drive a MEGATEK vector refresh 
graphics unit. The MEGATEK has a 4096 x 4096 screen and supports KB 
entry, joy-sHck, light-pen and tablet input. The graphics processor 
includes hard-wired 3-D, rotation/translation features which are 
activated through FORTRAN callable rouhnes. The S/140 is a 16-bit 
processor, has a '/2 megabyte main memory and supports up to 5 
terminals as configured at present. Other peripherals are a tape drive, 
24-megabyte hard disk (Winchester technology) and a floppy-disk — all 
Data General line compaHble. The operating system is AOS and 
communicates with the MV/8000's through XODIAC, hence allowing 
the S/140 users to make use of the 32-bit compilers and processors 
when needed. 

The microcomputers support BASIC in general; some support 
PASCAL and FORTRAN 17; the Atari supports a music composer, as 
well as the delightful game cartridges. All micros can become 
intelligent terminals to the networked systems. A Decwriter and an 
Epson are available as printers to any of the micros. 



Counseling 



Individual counseling is offered to students for personal problems, 
for marital and domestic problems and for study and career choice 
problems. Students can obtain assistance for educational, vocational 
and general life problems. 

The center offers psychological testing including vocational interest, 
personality assessment and academic placement. 



Dining 



The Student Center includes three separate student dining areas. A 
snack bar and the Rathskeller are located on the main floor. A full- 
menu dining commons and meal plan dining room are located on the 
ground floor. Three meal plan options are offered. A plan, while highly 
recommended for all students, is required for students living in the 
dormitory and YMCA. Meal plan contracts are available by contacting 
the Housing Office. This service is curtailed when the undergraduate 
term is not in session. 



Graduate Student 
Council 



The Graduate Student Council is a forum where graduate students 
can provide input to the administrahon in order to improve all aspects 
of graduate education at the university. The council schedules a 
number of extracurricular activities, and all graduate students are 
encouraged to attend. 



Handicapped 
Services 



The Office of Handicapped Services provides guidance and 
assistance to students with physical handicaps. The office also 
coordinates the university's compliance with section 504 of the H.E.W. 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. All inquiries and problems concerning 
barrier-free access to university facilities should be addressed to this 
office. 



Housing 



The Housing Office, located in the entry area of the dormitory, 
will assist graduate students in finding off-campus housing 
accommodations. The office is open from 8:30-4:30, Monday through 
Friday, for any student wishing to find housing accommodations. The 
office has listings for apartments, houses and private rooms. 



International 
Students 



Students from a number of countries are a part of the University of 
New Haven student body. The Office of International Student Affairs 
provides assistance in the following areas: all documentation pertaining 
to the Immigration and Naturalization Service; school transfers from 
and to UNH; orientation programs for international students; referral 
service for agencies that assist internationals; and the friendship family 
program. 



Library 



The Marvin K. Peterson Library, named in honor of the former 
president of the university, was opened in 1974. It has a capacity of 
300,000 bound volumes. Adjoining the Main Building, it includes 
special collection rooms, a music room, archives and spacious reading 
and reference areas. Study is made convenient by modern research 
facilities and equipment including microreading stations and 
micro-reader-printers. 

The library contains more than 300,000 volumes, 95,000 U.S. 
government documents, 10,000 record albums, numerous corporate 
annual reports, pamphlet files and microfilm. The library subscribes to 
1,400 periodicals, and extensive back issue files are maintained. 

The resources of both the New Haven and West Haven public 
libraries are available to students (non-residents must pay a fee). Under 
a reciprocal arrangement. University of New Haven students may 
borrow materials from the libraries of Albertus Magnus College or 
Quinnipiac College by presenting a valid UNH I.D. card. 



Minority Student 
Affairs 



The Office of Minority Affairs represents the needs and interests of 
minority students at the University of New Haven. The office works 
closely with minority students to ease the transition into the academic 
environment while enabling the student to maintain cultural pride and 
heritage. The office also promotes social and cultural activities which 
are of special interest to minority students. 



Publications 



Students publicaHons include The News, the university student 
newspaper; The Chariot, the annual yearbook; and The Noiseless Spider, a 
literary publication. Students may volunteer their services on any of the 
student publications. 



Student Services 123 



Veterans Affairs 



Since the university has one of the largest veteran enrollments in 
Connecticut, an Office of Veterans Affairs with a full-time staff is 
maintained. In addition to processing applications for various V.A. 
benefits, the office provides a wide range of supportive services for 
veterans attending the university. Assistance is available in academic 
areas, and special help such as funding for tutorial assistance, readers 
for the blind and aid for the disabled is also available. 



WNHU Radio 



WNHU, the university's student-operated FM stereo broadcast 
facility, operates throughout the year on a frequency of 88.7 MHz at 
a power of 1,700 watts. This extracurricular activity, open to all 
university students, serves southern Connecticut with music, news 
and community affairs programming. Its sportscasters are the voice of 
University of New Haven Charger sport teams. 



BOARD, 

ADMINISTRATION, 
AND FACULTY 

Board of Governors 

Henry E. Bartels, president, MRM Industries 

James Q. Bensen, former resident manager, Bethlehem Steel 

Corporation 
Roland M. Bixler, president, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 
Kirk F. Blanchard, assistant treasurer, Wyatt, Inc. 
Norman I. Botwinik, chairman: president, Botwinik Brothers, Inc. 
William C. Bruce, attorney at law. University of New Haven 
Mrs. J. F. Buckman 
Dr. Ann J. Capecelatro 
Abbott H. Davis Jr., vice president of directory & support services. The 

Southern New England Telephone Company 
E. Lucien DeShong, vice president, New Haven Projects, Olin 

Corporation 
Robert B. Dodds, former president. Safety Electrical Equipment 

Corporation 
Edward J. Drew, manager, Quinnipiack Club 
Joseph F. Duplinsky, chairman of the board and CEO, Blue Cross & 

Blue Shield of Connecticut 
John E. Echlin Jr., account executive, Bache, Halsey, Stuart, Shields, 

Inc. 
John D. Fassett, chairman of the board and chief executive officer. 

United Illuminating Company 
Frederick G. Fischer, vice chainnan; partner, Ernst & Whinney 
John A. Frey, president, Hersey Metal Products, Inc. 
Robert M. Gordon, former president, Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 
Frederick Grave IV, vice president. The Guyott Company 
Betsy Henley-Cohn, chairman & treasurer, Joseph Cohn & Son 
Phillip Kaplan, president. University of New Haven 
George E. Laursen, vice president-manufacturing. Health and Beauty 

Division, Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc. 
Harold R. Logan, vice chairman and director, W, R. Grace & Company 
Ellis C. Maxcy, former president. The Southern New England 

Telephone Company 
Timothy Mellon 
Alexander W. Nicholson Jr., president. Statewide Insurance 

Corporation 
Peter K. Orne, vice president and general manager, WTNH-TV 
Herbert H. Pearce, assistant secretary; president, H. Pearce Company 
Mrs. William F. Robinson Sr., Title IV consultant. State Department of 

Education 



Fenmore R. Seton, president, Seton Name Plate Corporation 

Leon J. Talalay 

George R. Tieman, secretary; attorney at law 

Cheever Tyler, attorney at law 

P. Takis Veliotis, vice president-marine and international. General 

Dynamics Corporation 
Barton L. Weller, chairman of the board, Vitramon, Incorporated 
F. Perry Wilson Jr., senior vice president. First Bank 
Robert F. Wilson, president, Wallace Silversmiths, Inc. 

Administration 

Phillip Kaplan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., President 

Alexis N. Sommers, B.M.E., M.S., Ph.D., Provost 

John E. Benevento, B.S., M.S., Vice President for Administration 

William S. DeMayo, B.S., M.B.A., Treasurer 

Walter Jewell, A.B., Ph.D., Secretary to the University 

James W. Uebelacker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Associate Provost 

Marjorie Montague, B.S., Controller and Assistant Secretary to the 

University 
Caroline A. Dinegar, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Assistant Provost for 

Governmental Affairs 
Joseph B. Chepaitis, A. B., M. A., Ph.D., Dean of the School of Arts and 

Sciences 
Marilou McLaughlin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the School of 

Business 
Konstantine C. Lambrakis, B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Dean of the 

School of Engineering 
William S. Gere Jr., B.M.E., M.S.I.E., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the 

Graduate School 
Richard C. Morrison, A.B., M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the School of 

Professional Studies and Continuing Education 

Faculty 1983-1984 

Arnold, Joseph J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Barratt, Carl, Assistant Professor, Physics 

B.Sc, Bristol University, England; Ph.D., Cambridge University 
Bechir, M. Hamdy, Professor, CivU Engineering 

B.C.E., Cairo University; M.A.Sc, University of Toronto; 

Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Bodon, Jean, Assistant Professor, Communication 

B.A., Birmingham Southern College; M.A., University of Alabama 
Brody, Robert P., Associate Professor, Management and Marketing 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.B.A., University of Chicago; 

D.B.A., Harvard University 
Carriuolo, Ralf E., Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt College; 

Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
Carson, George R., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College, New York; M.S.C.E., Columbia University 



Faculty 127 

Chandra, Satish, Professor, Accounting and Finance 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; 

LL.B., Lucknow Law School, India; LL.M., J.S.D., Yale University 
Chepaitis, Joseph B., Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 
Chun, Kee W., Professor, Physics 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; A.M., Princeton University; 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Costello, Francis J., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Newark College of Engineering 
DeMayo, William S., Professor, Accounhng and Finance 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University 
Desio, Peter J., Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 
Dichele, Ernest M., Assistant Professor, Accounting and Finance 

B.S., University of New Haven; J.D., Boston College Law School; 

LL.M., Boston University School of Law 
Dinegar, Caroline A., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Downey, James P., Associate Professor, Hotel/Restaurant 

Management, Dietetics and Tourism Administration 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin; 

Ph.D., Purdue University 
Dugan, Robert D., Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Dull, James W., Associate Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Farmer, Richard E., Associate Professor, Public Management 

A.B., St. Anselm's College; M.S., University of New Haven; 

Ed.D., Boston University 
Ferringer, Natalie S., Assistant Professor, Political Science 

B.S., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia 
Fitzmartin, John, Associate Professor, Economics and 

Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., Sacred Heart University; M.S., Southern Connecticut State 

College; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Fox, Kenneth P., Associate Professor, Public Management 

A.B., Columbia College of Columbia University; 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Frey, Roger G., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., Yale College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Gaensslen, Robert E., Professor, Public Management 

B.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Cornell University 
Gangler, Joseph M., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
George, Edward T., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D.Engr., Yale University 



Gere, William S., Jr., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., M.S. I.E., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D., 

Carnegie-Mellon University 
Glen, Robert A., Associate Professor, History 

B.A., University of Washington at Seattle; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 
Gordon, Judith Bograd, Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
Gray, Douglas, Associate Professor, Occupational Safety and 

Health Management 

B.S., University of California at Davis; M.S., University of Cincinnati; 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Griscom, Priscilla H., Industrial Engineering 

B.A., St. John's College; M.A., University of Rhode Island 
Gross, Franz B., Professor, Political Science 

M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 
Harricharan, Wilfred R., Professor, Management and Marketing 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
Hayden, George, Associate Professor, Public Management 

B.A., Curry College; M.A., Northeastern University; 

J.D., New England School of Law 
Hayes, Michael E., Associate Professor, Sociology 

A.B., Lawrence University; M.A., M.S.W., Ph.D., University of 

Michigan 
Hickey, Joseph E., Associate Professor, Public Management 

A.B., St. John's Seminary; A.B., St. Anselm's College; 

M.S., Central Connecticut State College; Ed.D., Boston University 
Hoffnung, Robert J., Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Hyman, Arnold, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Jewell, Walter O., Professor, Sociology 

A.B., Ph.D., Harvard University 
Kalma, Dennis L., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., Knox College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Kaloyanides, Michael G., Associate Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; 

Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Karatzas, George, Associate Professor, Economics and 

Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., Manchester University; M.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, Management and Marketing 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Kirwin, Gerald J., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.S.E.E., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology; Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Kleinfeld, Ira H., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Eng. Sc.D., Columbia University 
Lambrakis, Konstantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; 

Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



Faculty 129 

Lee, Henry C, Professor, Public Management 
B.S., John Jay College of Criminal Justice; 
M.S., Ph.D., New York University 
Mann, Richard A., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., University of Wisconsin; M.S.M.E., Northwestern 
University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; 
Ph.D., New York University 
Mathieu, Bertrand M., Professor, English 

B.A., Nasson College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Arizona 
McLaughlin, Marilou, Professor, Communication 

B.A., M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
McMahon, James, Associate Professor, Accounting and Finance 
B.S., Fordham University; M.S.O.R./Computer Science, Stanford 
University; Ph.D., The New School 
Maxwell, David A., Assistant Professor, Public Management 
B.B.A., University of Miami; M.A., John Jay College; 
J.D., University of Miami 
Meier, Robert D., Professor, Public Management 

B.S., Ursinus College; MA,, Ph.D., Columbia University 
Mentzer, Thomas L., Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 
Moore, John B., Assistant Professor, Economics and 
Quantitative Analysis 
B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic University; 
Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 
Monahan, Lynn H., Associate Professor, Public Management 
B.A., McGill University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oregon 
Morris, Michael, Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Boston College 
Morris, Harris L., Associate Professor, Chemistry 
B.E., M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology; 

M.B.A., University of New Haven; Ph.D., University of Michigan 
Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
O'Keefe, Daniel C, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 
B.E.E., City College of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie-Mellon 
University; Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
Pan, William, Professor, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

B.S,, National Cheng Kung University; M.B.A., Auburn University; 
Ph.D., Columbia University 
Parker, Joseph A., Professor, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 
Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Professor, Public Management 
A.B., Bates College; M.Ed., Springfield College; 
Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 
Plotnick, Alan, Professor, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Rainish, Robert, Associate Professor, Accounting and Finance 

B.S., City College of New York; M.B.A., Bernard M. Baruch College, 
City University of New York; Ph.D., City University of New York 
Raucher, Steven A., Associate Professor, Communication 
B.A., Queens College; M.S., Brooklyn College; 
Ph.D., Wayne State University 



Reimer, Richard, Associate Professor, Accounting and Finance 

B.B.A., University of Commerce, Vienna; 

M.S., Columbia University 
Robillard, Douglas, Professor, English 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Wayne State University 
Robin, Gerald D., Professor, Public Management 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
RoUeri, Michael, Assistant Professor, Accounting and Finance 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.B.A., University of Connecticut 
Ross, Bertram, Professor, Mathematics 

M.S., Wilkes College; M.S., Ph.D., Courant Institute, 

New York University 
Ross, Stephen M., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., New York University; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University 
Rosenthal, Erik J., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., Queens College, State University of New York; 

M.A., Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 
Sachdeva, Baldev K., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Delhi Uruversity, India; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University 
Sack, Allen L., Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University 
Saleeby, B. Badri, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 
Saliby, Michael, Assistant Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Union College; Ph.D., State University of 

New York at Binghamton 
Sandman, Joshua, Associate Professor, Political Science 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Sarris, John, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.S., Ph.D., Tufts University 
Sawhney, Shiv L., Professor, Management and Marketing 

B.A., LL.B., Delhi University; M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Scalia, Frank A., Professor, Management and Marketing 

B.A., University of Rochester; M.S., Carnegie Institute of 

Technology; Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 
Sherwood, Franklin B., Professor, Economics and 

Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Sloane, David E.E., Professor, English 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 
Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; 

Ph.D., Purdue University 
Spoerri, Peter, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute; M.S., Oregon State University; 

Ph.D., Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute 
Stanley, Richard M., Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E.S., The Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.PhU., 

Ph.D., Yale University 
Staugaard, Burton C, Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; 

Ph.D., Urjversity of Connecticut 



Faculty 131 

Surti, Kantilal K., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delaware; 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Teluk, John J., Professor, Economics and Quanhtative Analysis 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich; B.A., University of 

New Haven; M.A., Free University of Munich 
Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics and 

Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Turcotte, Margaret, Assistant Professor, Hotel/Restaurant 

Management, Dietetics and Tourism Administration 

B.S., M.B.A., University of New Haven 
Tyndall, Bruce, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 
Uebelacker, James W., Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., LeMoyne College; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Usiewicz, Ronald A., Associate Professor, Hotel/Restaurant 

Management, DieteHcs and Tourism Administration 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., University of 

Wisconsin-Stout; Ph.D., Kent State University 
Vasileff, Henry D., Associate Professor, Accounting and Finance 

B.A., M.A., University of Toronto; M.B.A., University of 

Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Toronto 
Vigue, Charles L., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., North Carolina State 

University 
Voegeli, Henry E., Associate Professor, Science and Biology 

B.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 
Von Magnus, Eric, Assistant Professor, Humanities 

B.A., Wittenberg University; M.A., University of Chicago; 

Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Wakin, Shirley, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., University of Bridgeport; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Massachusetts 
Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., Yale University; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Wentworth, Ronald N., Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern University; M.S. I.E., University of 

Massachusetts; Ph.D., Purdue University 
Werblow, Jack, Associate Professor, Public Management 

B.A., Cornell University; M.B.A., Wharton School of Finance; 

Ph.D., University of CincinnaH 
Weybrew, Benjamin B., Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.A., University of Kansas: M.A., University of California, 

Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of Colorado 
Wheeler, George L., Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.A., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University of Maryland 
Whitley, W. Thurmon, Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Stetson University; M.A., University of North Carolina at 

Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State 

University 
Wiggins, Catherine, Assistant Professor, PubUc Management 

B.S., Hampton Institute; M.S.W., University of Pennsylvania; 

Ph.D., New York University 



Wnek, Robert E., Assistant Professor, Accounting and Finance 
B.S., Villanova University; J.D., Delaware Law School of Widener 
College; LL.M., Boston University School of Law 

Wright, H. Fessenden, Professor, Science and Biology 

A.B., Oberlin College; M.S., Ph.D., CorneU University; F.A.l.C. 

York, Michael W., Associate Professor, Psychology 
B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; 
Ph.D., University of Maryland 



Faculty Professional 
Licensure and 
Accreditation 



Bechir, M. Hamdy, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, 

Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, Oklahoma 
Carson, George R., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, 

Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey; Landscape Architect, 

Connecticut; Land Surveyor, Connecticut, Massachusetts; 

Professional Planner, New Jersey 
Davis, George H., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 
DeMayo, William, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Dichele, Ernest M., Attorney at Law, Connechcut, Massachusetts; 

Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut, Massachusetts 
Everhart, Deborah, Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 
Hayden, George A., Attorney at Law, Massachusetts, Connecticut; 

U.S. District Court, Supreme Court of U.S. 
Hyman, Arnold, Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Mann, Richard A., Professional Engineer, Wisconsin 
Martin, John C, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, New York, 

Colorado, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Massachusetts 
Meier, Robert D., Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Monahan, Lynn Hunt, Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 
Parker, Joseph A., Accredited Personnel Specialist 
Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Consulting Psychologist, Wisconsin; 

Certified Psychologist, Province of Alberta, Canada 
Reimer, Richard, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Rolleri, Michael, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Ross, Bertram, Professional Engineer, New York, Ohio 
Scalia, Frank A., Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Surti, Kantilal K., Chartered Engineer, U.K. 
Warner, Thomas C, Jr., Professional Engineer, Connecticut 
Weybrew, Benjamin B., Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Wnek, Robert E., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut; 

Member of Bar, Connecticut; Member of Bar, Pennsylvania 
Wright, H. Fessenden, Registered Chemical Consultant 
York, Michael H., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 



Special Lecturers 



Allen, William, Lecturer, Executive Master of Business Administration 

Ph.D., University of Florida 
Annable, Bryan, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.B.A., University of Massachusetts 
Balba, Hamdy, Lecturer, Chemistry 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Research Manager of Environmental Chemistry and Metabolism, 

Uniroyal Chemical Co. 



Special Lecturers 133 

Benson, Douglas B., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., Union College 

Information Service Project Manager, Pepsi Cola Company 
Berecz, Victor G., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., Yale University 

Chief, Software Research & Technology, 

Norden Division of United Technologies Corporation 
Bertone, Carmen M., Lecturer, Psychology 

Ph.D., Los Angeles University 

Chief, Human Factors Engineering, Sikorsky Aircraft 
Bonin, John, Lecturer, ExecuHve Master of Business Administration 

Ph.D., University of Rochester 
Brown, Janice B., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Bremser, John, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., Wilkes College 

Associate Professional Staff, Schlumeerger-Doll Research Center 
Brignola, Joseph M., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Systems and Programming Manager, Producto Machine Corporation 
Bruce, William C, Lecturer, Management Science and Legal Studies 

J.D., Yale Law School 

Lynch, Traub, Keefe & Marlowe, Attorneys at Law 
Buchholz, Geraldine S., Lecturer, Public Management 

M.P.A., University of New Haven 

Executive Director, Waterford Public Health Nursing Services 
Burt, Harold V., Jr., Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.S., Polytechnic InsHtute of New York 

Assistant Vice President, United Bank & Trust Company 
Canfield, Warren, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.A., Fairfield University 

Field Representahve, Pacific International 
Cardona, Raymond A., Lecturer, Environmental Science 

Ph.D., St. John's University 

Manager of Registration and Toxicology at Uniroyal Chemical 

Company 
Carfora, John, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.Sc, Economics, London School of Economics 
Chan, Raymond, Lecturer, Economics and Quanritative Analysis 

Ph.D., Minnesota University 

Registered Professional Engineer, Uniroyal, Inc. 
Chmura, Joseph E., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S.C.I.S. & M.S.O.R., University of New Haven 

Staff Specialist, Southern New England Telephone Co. 
Ciarlone, Richard A., Lecturer, Economics and QuanHtative Analysis 

M.B.A., University of Maryland 

Manager, Decision Support Systems, Avco-Lycoming Corporation 
Cohen, Loris L., Lecturer, Legal Studies 

J.D., University of Miami Law School 

Staff Attorney, Connecticut Legal Services 
Culhane, Michael C, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitafive Analysis 

M.A., Fairfield University; J.D., University of Bridgeport 

Arbitrator 
Curtis, Carey, Lecturer, Accounfing and Finance 

M.B.A., University of Hartford; C.P.A. 

Technical Associate, Financial Accounfing Standards Board 



Dallob, David, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.B.A., Hofstra University 

Vice President, Operations Development, Division of Sperry-Rand 
Daly, Owen, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Senior Personnel Administrator, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
D'Amico-Reisner, Lynne, Lecturer, English 

M.A., University of Connecticut 
D'Amore, Robert, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., Quinnipiac College 

Cost AccounHng Manager, Emhart, Inc. 
Dary, David, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of Connecticut 

AVP-Portfolio Manager, City Bank, New York 
Davis, George H., Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 

Director of Counseling, University of New Haven 
DeMichiell, Robert, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
DeReamer, Russell, Lecturer, Occupational Safety and 

Health Management 

B.S., Purdue University 
Devaney, Earl, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.B.A., University of Massachusetts 

Gerald Rosen Company 
DiBattista, Carmine, Lecturer, Environmental Science 

M.S., Southern Connechcut State College 

Member Special Projects Team, City of New Haven 
DiNapoli, Alfred F., Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Senior Cost Accountant, Eyelet Specialty Company 
Donkin, Arthur, Lecturer, Accounhng and Finance 

M.B.A., Rutgers University 

President, Management Consulting, Essex Northeast 
Drost, Camille A., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Applicahon Speciahst, General Electric Co. 
Elliott, Douglas M., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

District Staff Manager, Southern New England Telephone Co. 
Engstrom, Albert G., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

GTE - National Account Manager, Data General Corporation 
Erickson, David L., Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of Cincinnati; C.P.A. 

Manager of Accounting, Pepperidge Farms 
Everhart, Deborah, Lecturer, Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 

Assistant Director of Counseling, University of New Haven 
Feldman, Gerald, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

EDP Consultant, Seward & Monde, C.P.A.'s 
Forbes, Raymond, Lecturer, Psychology 

Ph.D., U.S. International University 

Independent Consultant 



Special Lecturers 135 

Frascalore, Joseph C, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Staff Consultant, Hartford Insurance Group 
Fithian, Luke, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.B.A., Seton Hall University 

Marketing Manager, Uniroyal, Inc. 
Garber, Brad T., Lecturer, Occupational Safety & Health Management 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley 

Corporate Director of Safety, Olin Corporation 
Garrison, Stephen N., Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.B.A., Clemson-Furman Universities 

Executive Vice President, Flexowell Corporation 
Gerdine, Philip, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

Ph.D., Boston University 

Corporate Executive, General Electric Company 
Germaine, David, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.B.A., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Chief of Technical Support, General Dynamics 
Ghattas, Reda, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S. I.E., Rutgers University 

Manager, Industrial Engineering Department 

Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Greenberg, Richard, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

J.D., L.L.M., Boston University 

Assistant Attorney General, State of ConnecHcut 

Banking Department 
Griffin, John, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
Grodzinsky, Frances S., Lecturer, English 

Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Grozalsky, Samuel, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., Babson College 

Supervisor of Internal Audit, Uniroyal Inc. 
Haberman, Ronald A., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.A.E., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.O.R., Florida Institute 

of Technology 
Halberstam, David, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.S., Northwestern University 

Managing Consultant - Union Carbide Corporation 
Harter, Lillian G., Lecturer, Environmental Science 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Hartung, Daniel, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Manager, Employee Relations, Raymark Industries 
Hauser, Frank X., Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

B.B.A., St. John's University 

ControUer-Conh-oUership and Treasury, Boehringer Ingelheim, Ltd. 
Helie, Raymond, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., Babson College 

Supervisor of Internal Audit, Uniroyal Inc. 
Helms, Richard W., Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Director, Financial Analysis/Capital Budget, Uniroyal, Inc. 
Hertel, Eugene S., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., North Carolina State University 

Information Scientist, Uniroyal, Inc. 



Horwitz, Theodore, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.B.A., M.H.A., Cornell University 

President, MeridenAVallingford Hospital 
Jaffe, Francoise, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.S., Northwestern University 
James, William H., Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

Ph.D., Yale University 
Johnston, Robert J., Lecturer, Executive Master of 

Business Administration 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Independent Computer Consultant 
Kaletsky, Richard M., Lecturer, Occupational Safety and 

Health Management 

M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 

Supervisory Safety Specialist, Federal OSHA Office 
Kelley, David, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S. I.E., University of New Haven 

Systems Programming, Bunker-Ramo Info. Systems 
Keyes, Edward, Lecturer, Psychology 

Ph.D., University of Iowa 

Consulting Psychologist, Darien, CT 
Kramar, Marilyn, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

B.A., Clark University 
Kraus, John J., Lecturer, Management Marketing 

M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania 

Manager, Policies & Procedures, United Technologies Corp. 
Krause, Leonard, Lecturer, Occupational Safety and 

Health Management 

Sc.D., University of Cincinnati, Kettering Institute College of 

Medicine 

Director, Environmental Hygiene and Toxicology, Olin Corporation 
Kubic, Thomas A., Lecturer, Public Management 

J.D., St. John's University; M.S., C.W. Post 

Detective/Criminalist, Nassau County Police Department 
Kuchar, Charles, Lecturer, AccounHng and Finance 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Senior Portfolio Review Analyst, Barclays American Business Credit 
Landry, Roger, Lecturer 

M.B.A., University of Connecticut 

Director of Systems Development, St. Mary's Hospital 
Lanza, Gerald, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Principal Software Engineer, Bunker Ramo Corp. 
Lamberti, James T., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., Rutgers University 

Supervisor, Pratt & Whitney Aircraft 
Lavarini, Charles E., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of Arizona 
Lee, Patrick, Lecturer, Accounrtng and Finance 

L.L.M., Georgetown University 

Attorney, Corporate Tax, Wiggins & Dana 
Listro, John, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Loughlin, James C, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

Ph.D., Clark University 



Special Lecturers 137 

Luther, William, Lecturer, Executive Master of 

Business Administration 

B.B.A., University of Minnesota 

Marketing and Management Consultant 
Marchese, Michael ]., Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

Master of International Management, American Graduate School of 

International Management 

Vice President, International Management, Union Trust Company 
Markle, Arnold, Lecturer, Public Management 

L.L.B., Boston University 

State's Attorney for New Haven County 
Mathew, Philip I., Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

Ph.D., University of Maryland 
Mathur, Harish N., Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

M.S.E.E., University of Maryland 

Principal Engineer, General Data Comm Industries, Inc. 
Miles, Daniel, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

MB. A. /M.S. I.E., University of New Haven 

Supervisor of Shipbuilding, Groton Sub Base 
Miller, Richard A., Lecturer, Executtve Master of 

Business Administration 

Ph.D., Yale University 
McGough, Dennis R., Lecturer, Psychology 

M.A., University of New Haven 

Director of Staffing, Olin Corporation 
McGuigan, Austin, Lecturer, Public Management 

J.D., Boston University School of Law 

Chief State's Attorney, State of Connecticut 
McPherson, Stephen B., Lecturer, Public Management 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Controller, Hospital of St. Raphael 
Moore, Donald, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

EMBA, University of New Haven 

Plant Manager, Times Fiber Communications 
Nadimfard, Abbas, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

Ph.D., Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania 
Nann, Dorothy, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.S., University of Connecticut 

Controller, Hospital of St. Raphael 
Noonan, James, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Account ExecuHve, Merrill Lynch 
Norton, Phillip, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Systems Engineer, United Technology, Norden Division 
Oaks, Jose, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., New York University; C.P.A. 

Financial Manager, United Technologies Corporation 
O'Connor, Frank, Lecturer, Sociology 

M.S.W., University of Connecticut 

Social Worker, Yale-New Haven Hospital 
O'Mahony, Michael, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., Fordham University; M.A., Alabama University 

Project Manager, General Electric Company 



Ostrander, F. Taylor, Lecturer, Executive Master of 

Business Administration 

B.A., Williams College 

Consultant to AMAX Inc. 
Ostroske, Kenneth, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

J.D., University of Connecticut; C.P.A. 

Tax Manager, Arthur Young and Company 
Pae, Ki-Tai, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Patten, Joseph M., Lecturer, Executive Master of 

Business Administration 

M.A., University of Illinois 

Independent Consultant 
Pawlowski, Helen, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., Lehigh University 
Pinto, John D., Jr., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.A.S., Boston University 

Program Manager, Input-Output Computer Systems 
Potochney, Andrew, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of Bridgeport 
Purtill, John, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

B.S., University of Connecticut; C.P.A. 
Randall, Edward C, Lecturer, Executive Master of 

Business Administration 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Vice President of Finance, Domac Enterprises 
Reffner, John A., Lecturer, Public Management 

Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Reid, Thomas A., Lecturer, Psychology 

Psy.D., University of Illinois 

Director, Hamden Mental Health Service 
Rubin, David, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of Cincinnati; C.P.A. 
Ryack, Bernard L., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Assistant Director, Human Factors Department, Naval Submarine 

Medical Research Laboratory 
Ryba, Walter G. Jr., Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

Ph.D., Fordham University; J.D., University of Connechcut 
Salwan, Vem C, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Financial Analyst, Grolier, Inc. 
Sandel, Susan, Lecturer, Sociology 

Ph.D., Union Graduate School 

Coordinator of Psychosocial Programming, Sound View Specialized 

Care Center 
Santello, Dolph, Lecturer, Public Management 

D.P.A., Nova University 

Staff Manager, Information Systems Department 

Southern New England Telephone Company 
Scalise, Joseph, Lecturer, Public Management 

M.S.F.S., University of New Haven 

Chief Forensic Medical Investigator, Office of Medical Examiner, 

Nassau County 
Scheuing, Eberhard, Lecturer, ExecuHve Master of 

Business Administration 

Ph.D., University of Munich (Germany) 



Special Lecturers 139 

Schiffman, Leon G., Lecturer, Executive Master of 

Business Administration 

Ph.D., City University of New York 
Schwartz, Robert, Lecturer, Political Science 

J.D., Rutgers Law School 

Assistant Administrator, Yale-New Haven Hospital 
Seigle, Alfred, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

Ph.D., Columbia University 

Senior Vice President, Wayside Furniture 
Shapazian, Kenneth C, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of Connecticut 

Manager, Eastern Data Systems Center, General Dynamics 

Corporation 
Smith, Peter, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 

Investment Broker - Planned and Executed Investment Strategies 

Advest, Inc. 
Smith, W. Reed, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., Marietta College 

Manager, Operations Research/Economist, Uniroyal Chemical 

Company 
Sobolewski, Rosemary, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Director and Coordinator of the Computer Programming Training, 

Easter Seal Rehabilitation Center 
Sotir, Thomas, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.B.A., Xavier University 

Director of Industrial Relations, Electric Boat Division, 

General Dynamics Corporation 
Sullivan, Thomas, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

Ed.D., Nova University 
Sylvia, Edwin A., Lecturer, Psychology 

M.A., University of Southern Mississippi 

Chief, Management Development and Training, Electric Boat 

Division, General Dynamics Corporation 
Taranto, Armand C, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.B.A., University of Hartford 

Distinct Staff Manager, Southern New England Telephone Company 
Thornton, Richard, Associate Professor, Coordinator of Computing 

Activities 

Ph.D., Boston University 
Tolonen, Karl, Lecturer, Environmental Science 

Ph.D., Yale University 

Ecological Consultant to the New Haven Water Company 
Torello, Robert, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.B.A., University of New Haven 
Tu, Kueishiong, Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

Ph.D., Harvard University 

Member of Technical Staff, International Telephone and 

Telegraph Corp. (Ill) 
Tylaska, Theodore T., Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Houston 

Project Engineer, Naval Underwater Systems Center 
Usher, Theron, Lecturer, Electrical Engineering 

D.Eng., Yale University' 

Principal Engineer, Upholtz-Dickie Corp. 



Van Dyke, Elizabeth, Lecturer, Hotel/Restaurant, Dietetics, 

and Tourism Administration 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
Visconti, John, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.S., University of New Haven 

Staff Accountant, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells 
Walters, Gary B., Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

B.A., University of Connecticut; B.A., Eastern Connecticut 

Operations Research Analyst, Submarine Development - U.S. Navy 

Submarine Base 
Welsh, Walter, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

L.L.M. (in Taxation), New York University School of Law; 

J.D., University of Connecticut Law School 
Werblow, Suzanne, Lecturer, Economics and QuantitaHve Analysis 

Ed.M., Harvard University 
Williams, Jeffrey, Lecturer, Accounting and Finance 

M.B.A., University of Bridgeport; C.P.A. 

Charter Arms 
Williams, Richard C, Lecturer, Industrial Engineering 

M.B.A., Boston University 

Director, Product Company Coordination, The Continental Group 
Weinstein, Arnold K., Lecturer, Executive Master of 

Business Administration 

Ph.D., Columbia University 
Wilson, Ned, Lecturer, Executive Master of Business Administration 

Ph.D., Ohio State University 

President, New England Management Services, Inc. 
Winer, Leon, Lecturer, Executive Master of Business Administration 

Ph.D., Columbia Graduate School of Business 
Wolk, Stuart R., Lecturer, Executive Master of 

Business Administration 

Ph.D., St. Andrew's College 
Woodruff, Martha, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.A., Murray State University 
Zarkadis, Charles, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

M.A., Boston College 

Vice President Corporate Planning, SNETCO 
Zietlow, David, Lecturer, Management and Marketing 

M.L.I.R., Michigan State University 

Supervisor, Personnel, Sikorsky Aircraft 
Zottola, Armand, Lecturer, Economics and Quantitative Analysis 

Ph.D., Catholic University of America 



INDEX 



A 

A course prefixes 83 

Academic calendar 5 

Academic counseling 12 

Academic policies 12 

Academic programs 21 

Academic standards 13 

Accounting 

Concentration in the 

MBA. Program 25 

Course descriptions (A) 83 

M.S. degree program 21 

Senior professional certificate . . 72 
Accounting information systems 

senior professional certificate . . 72 
Accreditation of the university ... 9 

Administration 125 

Administrative studies 
concentration in the 

gerontology program 54 

Admission 

General requirements 9 

Categories 10 

International students 10 

Procedure 9 

Affirmative action 2 

Alumni association 119 

Appeals of probation 15 

Applications of psychology, 

senior professional certificate . . 73 

Athletics 119 

Auditors 10 

Awarding of degrees 13 

6 

Biology, environmental studies 
and general science course 
descriptions (SC) 114 

Board of Governors 125 

Bookstore 119 

Business administration/ 
industrial engineering dual 
degree program 33 

Business administration/public 
administrahon dual degree 
program 35 

Business administrahon, 

master's degree program 23 

Business law course descriphons 
(LA) 101 



c 

Calendar, academic 5 

Campus Store 119 

Career development 120 

C£ course prefixes 85 

CH course prefixes 86 

Chemistry course descriphons 

(CH) 86 

Civil and environmental engineering 

course descriphons (CE) 85 

CI course prefixes 86 

CO course prefixes 90 

Commencement 13 

Communicahon course 

descriphons (CO) 90 

Community psychology, 

Concentrahon in community — 

clinical 38 

Concentrahon in community 
organizahon and program 

administrahon 38 

M.A. degree program 36 

Computer and informahon science 
Concentrahon in 

the M.B.A. program 25 

M.S. degree program 39 

Computer applicahons and 
informahon systems senior 

professional cerhhcate 73 

Computer center 120 

Counseling 

Academic 12 

Personal 121 

Course descriphons 

Accounhng (A) 83 

Biology, environmental studies 
and general science (SC) ... 114 

Business law (LA) 101 

Chemistry (CH) 86 

Civil and environmental 

engineering (CE) 86 

Communicahon (CO) 90 

Criminal jushce (C/) 86 

Economics (EC) 90 

Electrical engineering (EE) .... 92 
Environmental engineering (CE) 85 
Environmental science (SC) . . 114 

Execuhve M.B.A. (EX/D) 93 

Finance (PI) 95 

General science (SC) 114 

Hotel & restaurant management 
(HM) 96 



Humanihes (HU) 97 

Intemahonal business (IB) .... 97 
Industrial engineering (IE) .... 98 

Law, business (LA) 101 

Logishcs (LG) 101 

Mathemahcs (M) 102 

Mechanical engineering (ME) . 103 
Management science (MG) . . . 104 

Markehng (MK) 106 

Occupahonal safety and 

health management (SH) ... 115 

Philosophy (PL) Ill 

Physics (PH) Ill 

Polihcal science (PS) Ill 

Psychology (P) 107 

Public Adminish-ahon (PA) . . . 109 
Quanhtahve Analysis (QA) ... 113 

Science (SC) 114 

Sociology (SO) 116 

Social Welfare (SW) 117 

Criminal jushce 

Concentrahon in correctional 

counseling 42 

Concentrahon in security 

management 42 

Professional cerhhcate in 

security management 43 

Concentrahon in criminal 

jushce management 41 

Course descriphons (CJ) 86 

M.S. degree program 40 

D 

Degree programs, 

see Programs of study 
Dietehcs adminishahon 

Concentrahon in the M.B.A. 

program 25 

Senior professional cerhhcate . . 73 

Dining 121 

Dormitory 122 

Dual degree programs 

M.B.A. /M.P.A 35 

M.B.A./M.S.I.E 33 



EC course prefixes 90 

Economic forecashng 
Concentrahon in the M.B.A. 

program 27 



142 



Senior professional certificate . . 74 
Economics course descriptions 

(EC) 90 

EE course prefixes 92 

Electrical engineering 

Course descriptions (EE) 92 

M.S. degree program 43 

ELI 11 

Eligibility for financial aid 19 

Employment placement 120 

English Language Institute (ELI) . 11 
Environmental engineering 

Course descriptions {CE) 85 

M.S. degree program 45 

Environmental sciences 

Course descriptions {CE) 114 

M.S. degree program 46 

Environmental studies course 

descriptions (SC) 114 

Ethics 14 

Execuhve Master of Business 
Administration 
Course descriptions {EXID) ... 93 

Degree program 47 

EXID course prefixes 93 

F 

Faculty 126 

Fees 17 

f / course prefixes 95 

Finance 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 27 

Course descriptions (f /) 95 

Senior professional 

certificate 74 

Financial accounting option, 

senior professional certificate . . 72 
Financial support for graduate 

study 19 

Foreign students, see 

International students 
Forensic science 

M.S. degree program 49 

Concentration in criminalistics . 50 
Concentration in advanced 

investigation 51 

Concentration in fire science . . 51 
Professional certificate in 
forensic science/advanced 

investigation 52 

Professional certificate in 
forensic science/ 

criminalistics 52 

Professional certificate in 

forensic science/fire science . 52 

Full-time study 14 

Fully matriculated student 10 



G 

General information. 

Graduate School 9 

General management seruor 

professional certificate 75 

General science course 

descriptions (SCj 114 

Gerontology 

Concentration in 

administrahve studies 54 

Concentration in psycho- 
social relations 54 

M.A. degree program 53 

Senior professional certificate . . 75 

Grade reports 14 

Grading system 14 

Graduate School ethics 14 

Graduate Student Council 121 

Graduation 13 

Grievance procedure 15 



H 

Handicapped services 122 

Health care management 
ConcentraHon in the M.B.A. 

program 28 

Concentration in the M.P.A. 

program 69 

HM Course prefixes 96 

Hotel & restaurant management 
ConcentraHon in the 

M.B.A. program 28 

Course descripHons (HM) 96 

Senior professional 

certificate 76 

Housing 122 

HU course prefixes 97 

Human resources management 
Concentration in the 

M.B.A. program 29 

Senior professional certificate . . 76 
Humanities 

Course descripHons [HU) 97 

M.A. degree program 54 

I 

IB course prefixes 97 

IE course prefixes 98 

In-process registraHon 10 

Independent study 15 

Industrial Engineering 

Course descripHons {IE) 98 

M.S. degree program 55 



Industrial/organizaHonal psychology 
M.S. degree program 57 

Industrial relaHons 

M.S. degree program 60 

InternaHonal business 
ConcentraHon in the 

M.B.A. program 30 

Course descripHons {IB) 97 

Senior professional certificate . . 77 

InternaHonal students 

Admission 10 

Office of 122 



J 



Job placement of students 120 

L 

LA course prefixes 101 

Law course descripHons {LA) . . . 101 
Legal studies 

Law and the industrial sector 

ConcentraHon 63 

Law and the public sector 

ConcentraHon 63 

M.A. degree program 62 

Library 122 

Living costs 18 

LogisHcs 

ConcentraHon in the 

M.B.A. program 30 

M 

M course prefixes 102 

M.A. degree programs, see 

Master of Arts degree programs 
Management and organizaHon 

ConcentraHon in the 

M.B.A. program 31 

Management science 

ConcentraHon in the 

M.B.A. program 31 

Course descripHons {MG) .... 104 
Mangerial accounHng opHon, 

accounHng senior 

professional cerHficate 72 

MarkeHng 

ConcentraHon in the 

M.B.A. program 32 

Course descriptions {MK) .... 106 

Senior professional cerHficate . . 77 
Master of Arts degree programs 

Community psychology 36 

Gerontology 53 



Index 143 



Humanities 54 

Industrial/organizational 

psychology 57 

Legal studies 62 

Master of Business 

Administration 23 

Master of Business Administration 
Executive degree program .... 47 

Master of Business Administration/ 
Master of Science in Industrial 
Engineering dual degree 33 

Master of Public Administration 
degree program 68 

Master of Business Administration/ 
Master of Public Administration 
dual degree program 35 

Master of Science degree programs 

Accounting 21 

Computer and information 

science 39 

Criminal justice 40 

Electrical engineering 43 

Environmental Engineering ... 43 

Environmental science 46 

Forensic science 49 

Industrial engineering 55 

Industrial relations 60 

Mechanical engineering 64 

Occupational safety and 

health management 65 

Operations research 67 

Taxation 69 

Mathematics course 
descriptions (M) 102 

MBA 23 

ME course prefixes 103 

Mechanical engineering 
Course descriphons {ME) .... 103 
M.S. degree program 64 

Media in business, senior 

professional certificate 78 

Media in business concentration 
in the M.B.A. program 32 

MG course prefixes 104 

Minority student affairs 122 

MK course prefixes 106 

M.P.A 68 

M.S. degree programs, see 
Master of Science degree programs 

o 

Occupational safety and 

health management 

M.S. degree program 65 

Operations research 

Concentration in the 

M.B.A. program 33 

M.S. degree program 67 



P 

P course prefixes 107 

PA course prefixes 109 

Payment of tuition and fees 17 

Personal counseling 121 

PH course prefixes Ill 

Philosophy course descriptions 

(PL) Ill 

Physically handicapped 

stu4ents 122 

Physics course descriptions (PH) 111 

PL course prefixes Ill 

Placement of graduates 120 

Political science course 

descriptions (PS) Ill 

Probation and appeals 15 

Programs of study 

Accounting 21 

Business administration 23 

Business administration/ 
Industrial engineering dual 

degree 33 

Business administration/public 
administration dual degree . . 35 

Community psychology 36 

Computer and information 

science 39 

Criminal justice 40 

Electrical engineering 43 

Environmental engineering ... 45 

Environmental science 46 

Executive master of business 

administration 47 

Forensic science 49 

Gerontology 53 

Humanities 54 

Industrial engineering 55 

Industrial/organizational 

psychology 57 

Industrial relations 60 

Legal studies 62 

Mechanical engineering 64 

Occupational safety and health 

management 65 

Operations research 67 

Public administration 68 

Taxation 69 

Provisional student 10 

PS course prefixes Ill 

Psycho-social relations 
concentration in the 

gerontology program 54 

Psychology course descriptions 

(P) 107 

Public administration 
Concentration in health care 

management 69 

Course descriptions (PA) 109 

Master's degree program 68 



Public management senior 

professional certificate 79 

Public personnel management 
option, public management 
senior professional certificate . . 79 

Publications 122 



Q 



QA course prefixes 113 

Quantitative analysis 
Course descriptions (QA) .... 113 
Senior professional certificate . . 80 

Quantitative techniques in 
marketing option, marketing 
senior professional certificate . . 78 



R 

Radio station WNHU 123 

Refunds of tuition 18 

Registration procedures 12 

Repetition of work 15 

Requirements for admission 9 

Research projecis, seminar projects 

and independent study 15 

Residency requirements 15 



s 

SC course prefixes 114 

Science course descriptions (SC) . 114 

Seminar projects 15 

Senior professional certificates ... 71 
Accounting 

Accounting information 

systems option 72 

Financial accounting option . 72 
Managerial accounting 

option 72 

Applications of psychology ... 73 
Computer applications and 

information systems 73 

Dietetics adrrdnistration 73 

Economic forecasting 74 

Finance 74 

General management 75 

Gerontology 75 

Hotel and restaurant 

management 76 

Human resources management 76 

International business 77 

Marketing 

Marketing option 78 

Quantitative techniques in 

marketing option 78 



144 



Media for business 78 

Public management 

Survey of the field option ... 79 
Urban and regional planning 
and management option . . 79 
Public personnel 

management option 79 

Quantitative analysis 80 

Taxation, 

Taxation of corporations 

option 80 

Taxation of individuals 

option 80 

Services for students 119 

SH course prefixes 115 

SO course prefixes 116 

Social w^elfare course descriptions 

(SW) 117 

Sociology course descriptions 

(SO) 116 



Special student 10 

Student Council, Graduate 121 

Student services 119 

Survey of the field option, public 

management senior 

professional certificate 79 

SW course prefixes 117 

T 

Taxation 

M.S. degree program 69 

Taxation senior professional 

certificates 80 

Thesis requirements 15 

Time Umit for completion of 

degree requirements 16 

Title IX 2 

Transfer credit 16 

Tuition and Fees 17 



u 



Urban and regional planning and 
management option, public 
management senior 
professional certificate 79 



V 



Veterans affairs 123 



w 



Waiver of courses 16 

Withdrawal from the university . 18 
WNHU radio 123 



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University erf NewHaven Second Class 

300 Orange Avenue Postage Paid 

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